Kumbh bathing in Prayagraj

November 2, 2022

Allahabad, now Prayagraj, was the Capital of India just for a day

Filed under: Lucknowledge — admins @ 6:17 am

As the Sangam city celebrates November 1 as the day when Prayagraj (then Allahabad) was made the nation’s capital for a day on November 1, 1858, few would know that it was in 1836 that a proposal was moved to make it the capital of the entire North-West Province the present-day Uttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand.

“After suppressing the uprising of 1857, ‘Allahabad’ became the capital for a day on November 1, 1858. The East India Company entrusted the administration of the nation in the city to the British monarchy. Meerut, Agra and Delhi were burning, so Prayagraj, which was under the British rule, was made the capital by the British to announce the transfer of power,” said former head of the department of Medieval and Modern History at Allahabad University, Prof Heramb Chaturvedi.

He added that although 22 years before this, it was in 1836 that the East India Company had planned to make Prayagraj the capital of the entire North-West Province but due to the circumstances, the move was not approved. Due to the Mughal rulers living in Delhi-Agra, the company moved to Agra with equipment.

“The British East India company wanted to have its capital in Delhi but since the place was being ruled by Mughals, the next option was to have the capital in Allahabad. This was mulled over by the company but later on they dropped the idea and chose Agra as the capital of North-West province as it was near to Delhi so it was the ideal place for the company and it remained the capital of North-West province till 1857”, explains Prof Chaturvedi.

Prof Chaturvedi said that the situation in Delhi, Agra and Meerut was very volatile because of the uprising and in such circumstances; it was not possible to read the proclamation about the transfer of power there. “At the same time, Allahabad was completely under the control of British rule. This is the reason why it was chosen as the one-day capital to read the manifesto of Queen Victoria. Viceroy Lord Canning read out the queen’s manifesto at the place where present-day Minto Park is located on the banks of the Yamuna,” he added. He further informed that with this, the rule of the Queen was established in place of the East India Company in India.

Another former HOD of the same department, Prof Yogeshwar Tiwari, said: “The Viceroy read the proclamation of Lord Canning. In its true sense, it was more an apology to the British than a transfer of power, which was done to heal the people’s anger by the company’s atrocities on Indians.”

Prayagraj / Allahabad

October 1, 2022

Indian Mutiny Casualties List (Indian Units)

Filed under: Lucknowledge — admins @ 9:49 am

Indian Mutiny 1857 – 9

OTHER INDIAN UNITS:

Gwalior Contingent :

Major Muirson Thrower Blake – 2nd Regt. Gwalior Contingent – killed 15th June 1857
Grave at the Christian Cemetery, Gwalior – “Sacred to the memory of Major Muirson Thrower Blake Comdg 2nd Regt Gwalior Contingt who was shot by the mutineers at Gwalior on entering the lines of the Regt on the night of 15th June 1857 in his … Year. His remains were interred here by some Sepoys of his Regt. This monument is raised by his afflicted widow.”

Captain William Stewart – murdered by mutineers at Moorar – 14th June 1857 – 2nd Co. Artillery.
From Ardvorlich, Perthsire. His wife, Jane and young son Robert were also murdered at the same time.

Hodson’s Horse :

Major W. S. R. Hodson – wounded at Begam Kothi, Lucknow – 11th March 1857 – died of wounds

Lieutenant Charles Theophilus Metcalfe McDowell – killed in action at Shumshabad – 27th January 1858. Aged 28. Son of Lieut-Colonel George McDowell, CB, 16th Light Dragoons. Joined the Bengal Army in 1846.

Hyderabad Contingent :

Captain John Sinclair – wounded at Jhansi – 3rd April 1858. died of wounds

Loodiana Regiment :

Lieutenant Patrick Mara – murdered by mutineers at Junapore – 5th June 1857

Malwa Contingent :

Lieutenant Charles John Hunt – murdered by mutineers at Muttragur – 7th June 1857
Aged 27. Son of Revd Thomas Hunt, of West Felton, Salop.

Lieutenant George L. Mills – murdered by mutineers at Mehidpore – 8th November 1857
(attached from the 14th Bombay Native Infantry).

Oude Irregular Cavalry :

Lieutenant Alexander – killed in action at Allahabad – 6th June 1857

Lieutenant Box – killed in action at Lucknow – 22nd December 1857

Oude Irregular Infantry :

Captain George Pratt Barlow – Major of Brigade, Oude Irregular Force – died of wounds at Lucknow – 21st August 1857

Captain E.J. Hughes – wounded at Lucknow – 28th September 1857. died of wounds

Lieutenant Joseph Cudbert Longueville Clarke – 67th Bengal Native Infantry – murdered by mutineers at Bhyram Ghaut – 13th June 1857. Aged 28. Assistant-Commissary in Oude, serving with the 3rd Oude Irregulars.
Memorial at Harrow School – “Sacred to the memory of Joseph C. Longueville Clarke Lieut in the 67th Bengal Native Infantry & 2nd in Command of the 3rd Oude Infantry who was murdered by the mutineers during the Indian Revolt of 1857 at the age of 28 yrs.”

The Corps of Guides – Infantry :

Lieutenant Alexander William Murray – killed in action at Delhi – 14th September 1857.
Aged 21. Son of Rev. David Murray, of Hereford. Joined the Bengal Army in 1853.
Grave on the Ridge, Delhi – “Sacred to the memory of Alexander William Murray, Lieutenant in the 42nd Bengal NLI and attached during the Siege of Delhi to the Corps of Guides who fell while encouraging his men to follow his own brave example on the 14th September 1857. In admiration of his unvarying gallantry, his Comrades in the Guides erect this tomb.”

Punjab Cavalry :

Major Charles Ayshford Sanford – killed in action at Lucknow – 10th March 1858.
Aged 28. Son of Edward Sanford and Henrietta, of Somerset. Joined the Bengal Army in 1850.

Captain John Peloquin Cosserat – wounded at Koorsee – 23rd March 1858. died 18th April 1858
Aged 33. 1st Punjab Cavalry. Son of Revd. George P. Cosserat, Rector of Drinkstone, Suffolk.

Lieutenant Frederick James MacDonnell – killed in action at Koorsee – 23rd March 1858.
Aged 25. Born in Dublin. Joined the Bengal Army in 1853.

Punjab Infantry :

Lieutenant Thomas Frankland – killed in action at Lucknow – 16th November 1857
Aged 29. Son of Sir Frederick Frankland and Dame Katherine Margaret Frankland. Two other sons also died in service – Midshipman Frederick Roger Frankland, HMS Winchester who died of fever at Sierre Leone, 23 Jan. 1844, aged 20 and Midshipman Harry Albert Frankland, HMS Alarm, died of fever off Vera Cruz, 9 May 1847, aged 17.
Memorial at St. Marys Church, Thirsk – “Sacred to the memory of Thomas Frankland, Lieut 48th Madras Native Infantry and 2nd in Command 2nd Punjab Regt killed in action with the sepoy rebels, leading an assault at the Relief of Lucknow 17th Nov. 1858 aged 29 years.”

Lieutenant H. T. Macqueen – wounded at Lucknow – 16th November 1857. died of wounds

Lieutenant Frederic Folliott Oldfield – wounded at Lucknow – 16th November 1857. died of wounds
Son of H.S. Oldfield, late Bengal Civil Service.

Lieutenant Eaton Joseph Travers – wounded at Delhi – 3rd August 1857. died of wounds
Aged 32. 32nd B.N.I. Served with 1st Punjab Rifles. Son of the late Major-General Sir Robert Travers, KCB.

Lieutenant E. C. P. Willoughby – killed in action at Rooya – 15th April 1858

Lieutenant George Austen Patterson Younghusband – 5th Punjab Infantry – 2nd January 1858
Memorial at Bamburgh Parish Church, Northumberland – “Lt. George Austen Patterson Younghusband 5th Punjab Infantry Born 18th November 1831 – mortally wounded at Futtehgur during the Indian Mutiny 2nd January 1858.”
Memorial at St. Peters Church, Freshford, Avon – “In memory of Lieut. George Younghusband, Commanding Squadron 5th Punjab Cavalry on the outbreak of the terrible Indian Mutiny of 1857. He was serving on the Afghan border of India then, that renowned body the Delhi Army was formed, his squadron with 2 others of the Punjab Force pressed forward and joined it as the avenging army swept through Delhi on to Agra, to Cawnpore, to Lucknow; their charging cry was heard on every battlefield and never heard but was followed by victory at last, when the campaign was nearly closed, he fell mortally wounded, near Futteghur on 2nd Jany 1858 and died on the second day aged 26 years. He was borne to his grave by grey bearded Sikh warriors who wept when they thought he had led them in his last battle.”
Memorial at St. Aidans Church, Bamburgh, Northumberland – “To the glory of God and in memory of the five sons of Major-General Charles Younghusband Royal Artillery. General Romer Younghusband CB Bombay Staff Corps. Born 10 December 1819, died 12 December 1905. Lieut.gen. Charles Younghusband, CB, FRS, Royal Artillery. Born 20 June 1821, died 28 October 1899. Major-General John William Younghusband, CSI, Bombay Staff Corps. Born 2 January 1823, died 20 July 1907. Lieutenant Edward Younghusband 9th Bombay, born 30 July 1824, killed in action at the siege of Mooltan 27 December 1848. Lieut. George Austen Patterson Younghusband 5th Punjab Cavalry, born 18 November 1831, mortally wounded at Futtehghur during the Indian Mutiny 2 January 1858.”

Seikh Irregular Cavalry :

Captain Frederick Wale – killed in action at Lucknow – 21st March 1858
(att. from 48th Bengal N.I.) Aged 23. Son of General Sir Charles Wale, KCB, 33rd Foot. Commanding Wale’s Horse.

Lieutenant R. A. Hamilton – killed in action at Tonse River, Azimghur – 15th April 1858
(att. from 10th Bengal Light Cavalry).

Lieutenant A. R. Mackenzie – killed in action at Lucknow – 2nd March 1858

Seikh Infantry :

Lieutenant R. J. Grant – killed in action at Jerwah – 30th April 1859.
(att. from 64th Bengal N.I.)

Lieutenant James Yorke – wounded at Delhi – 19th June 1857. died of wounds.
(att. from 3rd B.N.I.)

Bengal Volunteer Cavalry :

Lieutenant L. Hunt – killed in action near Saugur

Bengal Yeomanry Cavalry :

Captain A. Giffard – wounded at Doomureeagunge – 26th November 1858. died of wounds

Cornet Hugh Troup – killed in action at Tilga – 17th April 1858

THE MADRAS ARMY:

4th Madras Light Cavalry :

Captain J.S. Douglas – wounded at Kheri – 7th October 1858. died of wounds

Captain A. Tottenham – wounded at Ramkarra, near Jabalpore – 6th November 1857. died of wounds

5th Madras Light Cavalry :

Captain George Lawrence Herbert Gall – killed carrying despatches from Lucknow to Allahabad – 13th June 1857
Commanding 2nd Oude Irregular Cavalry.

8th Madras Light Cavalry :

Captain George King Newberry – killed in action at Lingasagoor, near Shorapur – 8th February 1858
Son of Thomas Raikes Newberry.

1st Madras Fusiliers :

Memorial at the Residency, Lucknow – “Sacred to the memory of Brigadier General J.G.S. Neill A.D.C. to the Queen. Col J.L. Stephenson c.o. Major S.G.C. Renaud Lieut. W.G. Groom. Lieut N.H. Arnold. Lieut A.A. Richardson. Lieut J.A. Chisholm Liuet F. Dobbs 352 non-commissioned officers, drummers and rank and file of the First Madras Fusiliers who fell during the supression of the rebellion in Bengal 1857-58.”

Lieutenant-Colonel John Stephenson, C.B.- wounded at Lucknow – 5th October 1857. died of wounds 21st October 1857
Aged 47.

Major Syndenham George C. Renaud – wounded at Aong, 15th July 1857. Left leg amputated. died of wounds

Lieutenant Nelson Henry Arnold – wounded at Charbagh Bridge, Lucknow – 25th September 1857. Left leg amputated. died of wounds

Lieutenant H. Francis – killed in action at Lucknow – 16th November 1857

Lieutenant William Tate Groom – wounded at Lucknow – 5th October 1857. died of wounds 21st October
Aged 26. Son of the late Richard Groom, Solicitor to the India Board.

Lieutenant Angelo Richardson – killed in action at Oonao – 29th July 1857

3rd Madras European Regiment :

Lieutenant Clarence Colbek – wounded at Banda – 19th April 1858. died of wounds 20th April 1858

10th Madras Native Infantry :

Captain Francis David Gordon – murdered by mutineers at Jhansi – 7th June 1857
Assistant-Superintendent, Jhansi District. Aged 35. Last surviving son of Michael Francis Gordon, of Abergeldie, Aberdeenshire. (The Times 5-8-57)

Captain W.G.P. Jenkins – killed in action at Enotah – 14th October 1857

31st Madras Native Infantry :

Lieutenant Charles Marsham Parsons – drowned near Fyzabad – 8th June 1857
Aged 25. Son of the late Lieut-Colonel Parsons, CMG. Drowned while escaping from mutineers of 17th Bengal N.I. while he was serving with the 6th Oude Irregulars.

34th Madras Native Infantry :

Lieutenant John Peloquin Cosserat – wounded at Lucknow, 23rd March 1858 – died of wounds 10th April 1858.

35th Madras Native Infantry :

Lieutenant H.P. Power – killed in action near Sircy – 19th February 1858

39th Madras Native Infantry :

Captain H.D. Hart – murdered by mutineers at Vellore – 12th November 1858

Captain John Sinclair – killed in action at Jhansi – 3rd April 1858
Memorial at Bower cemetery, Caithness – “Erected by officers 39th Madras Native Infantry in memory of Capt John Sinclair, eldest son of Sir John Sinclair, Baronet of Dunbeath, killed in action Jhansi 5.4.1858 aged 35.”

40th Madras Native Infantry :

Captain A.P. Woodbridge – killed in action near Sumbulpore – 12th February 1858
Son of E.C. Woodbridge, of Brighton.

43rd Madras Native Infantry :

Lieutenant R.C.A. Stuart – wounded at Mandwar – 20th January 1858. died of wounds

48th Madras Native Infantry :

Lieutenant Thomas Frankland – killed in action at Lucknow – 17th November 1857
Son of Sir Frederick Frankland (8th Baronet of Thikleby, Yorkshire and Dame Katharine.
Memorial in St. Simon’s Church, Portsmouth – “….. also of their three gallant sons: Fredk. Roger, Midshipman HMS Revenge who died of fever at Sierra Leone Jan 23rd 1845. Thomas, Lieut 48th M.N.I. killed in action at the Secunderbagh Nov 17th 1857. Harry Albert, Midshipman HMS Alarm who died of yellow fever at Vera Cruz May 9th 1847.”

Madras Artillery :

Lieutenant C. W. Crump – killed in action at Lucknow – 26th September 1857

Madras Engineers :

Captain C. Scott – killed in action at Rehora – 23rd November 1858

THE BOMBAY ARMY:

General Brackley Kennett – Bombay Army – wounded at Coonoor 8th October 1857, died 12th.
Ref. The Times (5-12-57). Attacked by an assassin.

1st Bombay Light Cavalry :

Colonel J. Penney – killed in action at Nusseerabad – 28th May 1858

Captain Hugh Spottiswoode – killed in action at Nusseerabad – 28th May 1858
‘Killed while charging at the head of his regiment, a 6 gun battery of the mutineers supported by 2 regiments of infantry’ (The Times 24-7-57)

Lieutenant J. M. Heath – killed in action at Gwalior – 19th June 1858

Cornet William Mills – killed in action at Gwalior – 19th June 1858

Cornet Richard Nicholas Newbury – killed in action at Nusseerabad – 28th May 1858
Aged 20. Shot while assisting to recapture guns from the mutineers. (ref. The Times)

2nd Bombay Light Cavalry :

Captain N. B. Tucker – killed in action at Jeerum – 23rd October 1857

1st Bombay Fusiliers :

Lieutenant G. J. H. Burnes – murdered by mutineers at Lucknow – 19th November 1857

Lieutenant William Marwood Mules – killed in action at Multan – 31st August 1858.
Aged 33. Son of Philip Mules, of Devon. Joined the Bombay Army in 1844. Served in the Punjab Campaign (1848).
Grave at New Cemetery, Multan – “Sacred to the memory of Lieut. William Marwood Mules late Adjt. 1st Bombay Fusiliers who was killed during the mutiny at Mooltan 31st August 1858 aged 33 years. Erected by his brother officers as a mark of esteem and affection.”

3rd Bombay European Regiment :

Lieutenant James W. Henry – murdered by mutineers at Nandoor – 4th October 1857
Superintendent of Ahmednuggur Police. Son of Arthur Henry, of Lodge Park, Co. Kildare.

1st Bombay Native Infantry :

Lieutenant Charles Bromhead Bannerman – killed in action at Delhi – 8th September 1857
Aged 22. Son of Patrick, of Aberdeen.

9th Bombay Native Infantry :

Lieutenant G. Grant – wounded at Lucknow – 26th July 1857. died of wounds 29th July 1857

Ensign E. I Stubbs – murdered by mutineers at Kolapore – 2nd August 1857

10th Bombay Native Infantry :

Lieutenant E. C. Willoughby – killed in action at Fort Roodanow – 15th April 1858

14th Bombay Native Infantry :

Lieutenant G. L. Mills – murdered by mutineers at Mehidpore – 8th November 1857

23rd Bombay Native Infantry :

Captain Robert Bainbridge – killed in action at Kotah – 1st April 1858
Aged 33. Son of Colonel Bainbridge, of Guernsey. Killed when the magazine was exploded by mutineers.
Memorial at St. Andrews Church, La Route de St. Andre, Channel Islands  – “To the memory of Captain Robert Bainbrigge, 23rd Regt Bombay Native Infantry, second son of Colonel Bainbrigge of the Rohais Manor, in this parish, killed April 1st 1858 in his 34th year in the zealous performance of an important duty, by the treacherous explosion of the enemy’s magazine, after the assault and capture of the fortress and city of Kotah. This excellent and energetic young officer, after an active service with his regiment in India, or in charge of an irregular corps, the Sawant-Warree; obtained leave of absence, joined the Allied Army in the Crimea commanded a Company during the latter part of the siege and fall of Sebastopol. On the breaking out of the mutiny in Bengal, Capt. Bainbrigge returned to his own Presidency and was appointed to the Staff of the Bombay Army as Major of Brigade in the Rajpootana Field Force. This tablet has been erected by his sorrowing parents.”

24th Bombay Native Infantry :

Lieutenant Atherton Allan Park – killed in action at Jhansi – 3rd April 1858
Aged 23. Son of Alexander Atherton Park, of Wimple Street, London.

25th Bombay Native Infantry :

Lieutenant Wellington Rose – wounded at Gwalior – 19th June 1857. died of wounds

27th Bombay Native Infantry :

Lieutenant J.T. Norris – murdered by mutineers at Kolapore – 2nd August 1857

Ensign Frederick William Heathfield – murdered by mutineers at Kolapore – 2nd August 1857
Son of Richard Heathfield, Sussex Square, Hyde Park, London.
Parents memorial at Christ Church, Harrow – “Frederick William Heathfield, third son, late of the 27th Bombay NI who fell in the Indian Mutiny near Kolhapur Aug 2nd 1857 aged 18 years.”

Scindia Contingent :

Major John Jacob – murdered by mutineers at Agra – 6th July 1857

Bombay Engineers :

Lieutenant William George Douglas Dick – killed in action at Jhansi – 8th April 1858
Aged 22. Son of the late John Campbell Dick, Bengal Civil Service.

2nd Lieutenant Charles Hancock – wounded in explosion at Kotah – 30th March 1858. died of wounds 14th April 1858 Aged 21. Son of Major-General Hancock, Bombay Army.

2nd Lieutenant Hugh R. Meiklejohn – killed in action at Jhansi – 8th April 1858

THE INDIAN MEDICAL SERVICE:

Superintending-Surgeon John Boon Hayes – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Born 19 August 1826. According to Roll of IMS he died in Calcutta 18 July 1856?

Senior-Surgeon James Graham – murdered by mutineers at Sealkote – 9th July 1857
Born 28 Jan. 1797. Aged 60. Served in the Gwalior (star) and Sutlej (medal & clasp) Campaigns.

Senior-Surgeon Kinloch Winlaw Kirk – murdered by mutineers at Moorar – 13th June 1857
Born 24 Dec. 1814. Author of ‘Topography of the Sind’ (1847).
Grave at the Christian Cemetery, Gwalior – “Sacred to the memory of Kinloch Winlaw Kirk M.D. Superintending surgeon Gwalior contingent. Shot by mutinous sepoys on the 15th June 1857 Aged 45 years.”

Surgeon William Robert Boyes – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Born October 1816. Serving with 1st Bengal Native Cavalry. Son of William Boyes, of Brixton Hill, Surrey. His wife, Kate, was also killed.

Surgeon Nathaniel Collyer – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Born 6 August 1806.

Surgeon Christopher Garbett – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Born 20 June 1806. Served Punjab campaign.

Surgeon Arthur Wellesley Robert Newenham – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Born 21 August 1812. Served Sutlej campaign.

Surgeon Thomas Smith – murdered by mutineers at Meerut – 10th May 1857
Born 15 July 1809.

Assistant-Surgeon Robert Dallas Dove Allan – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Born April 1819. Served Sutlej campaign (medal 2 clasps).

Assistant-Surgeon Robert Henry Bartrum – killed in action at Lucknow – 26th September 1857
Aged 26. Serving with the 3rd Oude Irregular Infantry.

Assistant-Surgeon Henry Thomas Cary – killed in action at Mehidpore – 8th November 1857
Born 27 July 1833.

Assistant-Surgeon Edmund Darby – died of wounds at Lucknow – 27th October 1857
Aged 24. Serving with 10th Oude Irregular Infantry. Son of Sydney Hudson Darby, of Tienga, Bandorah River, Australia. Wounded by a shell and died soon after. His wife, Mary, and child were killed at Lucknow.

Assistant-Surgeon Anthony Dopping – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857
Born 6 August 1830.

Assistant-Surgeon Hartwell Samuel Garner – murdered by mutineers at Segowlee – 9th July 1857
Born July 1821. Served Sutlej and Punjab campaigns. Serving with the 12th Irregular Cavalry when killed. His wife Susan and one of their two children were also killed.

Assistant-Surgeon John Colin Graham – killed in action at Sealkote – 9th July 1857
Born 24 Nov. 1819 at Bhagalpur. Son of Major-General John Graham, Bengal Army. Served in the Punjab campaign (medal 2 clasps)

Assistant-Surgeon George Hansbrow – murdered by mutineers at Bareilly – 31st May 1857
Born 6 Feb 1823.

Assistant-Surgeon Horatio Philip Harris – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Born 11 July 1823 at sea, near Ceylon. Son of Henry Harris (Asst-Surgeon Bengal Army).

Assistant-Surgeon John MacDowell Hay – murdered by mutineers at Bareilly – 31st May 1857
Born 2 Feb 1819, son of Surgeon John Hay (Madras Army). Served Gwalior (star).

Assistant-Surgeon Thomas Godfrey Heathcote – killed in action at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Born Feb. 1818. Co-author of ‘The Adaman Islands’

Assistant-Surgeon Marcus George Hill – murdered by mutineers at Seetapore – 2nd June 1857
Born 1829.

Assistant-Surgeon William Henry James – murdered by mutineers at Agra – 4th July 1857
Born 9 Nov. 1829.

Assistant-Surgeon Robert Lyell – killed in a riot at Patna – 3rd July 1857
Born 30 May 1825. Served Punjab campaign (medal 2 clasps). Author of ‘Notes on Patna Opium Agency’ (1857).

Assistant-Surgeon Daniel MacAuley – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Born 1 August 1830.

Assistant-Surgeon Samuel Maltby – killed in action at Cawnpore – 15th July 1857
Born Sept. 1820.

Assistant-Surgeon Thomas Moore – murdered by mutineers at Jogeermarah – 17th November 1857
Born 28 Nov. 1819 in America. Appointed to the Gwalior Contingent, served Sutlej campaign. Author of ‘Selections from my Medical Notebooks’ (1852).

Assistant-Surgeon M. Sadler – murdered by mutineers at Kotah – 15th October 1857

Assistant-Surgeon Thomas Hewlett Woodward – killed in action at Delhi – 31st August 1857
Born 5 Dec. 1832. Son of William James, of Tunbridge Wells.

ECCLESIASTICAL DEPARTMENT :

Chaplin George W. Coopland – murdered by mutineers at Moorar – 15th June 1857
Eldest son of Revd. George Coopland, Rector of St. Margaret’s, York.
Grave in the Christian Cemetery, Gwalior – “To the memory of Rev. George William Coopland M.A. Late fellow of St. Catherine’s College Cambridge and H.E.I.C.’S Chaplain. He was killed at Gwalior by the Sepoys on the morning of 15th June 1857 in the 30th year of his age. He had been chaplain of Gwalior for 6 months. This monument was erected by his widow after the retaking of Gwalior June 1858.”

Chaplin E.T.R. Moncrieff – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

September 1, 2022

Indian Mutiny Casualties List (Bengal Commissariat & Ordnance)

Filed under: Lucknowledge — admins @ 9:46 am

Indian Mutiny 1857 – 9

BENGAL COMMISSARIAT & ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT:

Assistant Commissary Nicholas Reilly – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Conductor William Berrill – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Conductor Geoffrey Coleman – wounded at Allahabad – 22nd June 1857. died of wounds

Conductor J. Nolan – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857

Conductor John Scully – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857.
Aged 42. Born in Dublin. One of the ‘Devoted Nine’.

Conductor George William Shaw – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857.
Aged 46. Born in London. One of the ‘Devoted Nine’.

Conductor W. G. Woods – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857

Sub-Conductor G. Connor – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857

Sub-Conductor William Crow – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857.
Aged 36. Born in Berwick. One of the ‘Devoted Nine’.

Sub-Conductor R. N. Settle – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857

Sub-Conductor William H. West – killed in action at Kotah – 26th March 1858

Sub-Conductor J. White – died of wounds at Lucknow – 23rd August 1857

Sub-Conductor Roger Wood – died of wounds at Lucknow – 19th August 1857

August 1, 2022

Indian Mutiny Casualties List (Bengal Artillery & Engineers)

Filed under: Lucknowledge — admins @ 9:41 am

Indian Mutiny 1857 – 9

Bengal Horse Artillery. 1st Brigade:

Lieutenant-Colonel Murray Mackenzie – wounded at Delhi – 2nd July 1857. died at Simla, 5th October 1857. Aged 43. Born in Middlesex. Son of John & Helen. Joined Bengal Artillery 1828. Husband of Emily Watson.
Grave at Simla New Cemetery – “Sacred to the memory of Lt. Colonel Murray Mackenzie, Bengal Horse Artillery, died 5th October 1857 from the effect of wounds received at Delhi, aged 44 years.”

Lieutenant D. C. Alexander – wounded at Lucknow – 16th September 1857. died of wounds

Lieutenant Henry George Perkins – killed in action at Ghazee-od-deen Nuggur – 31st May 1857. Aged 27. Memorial at Meerut – “In memory of 1st Lieutenant Henry George Perkins ….. of the 2nd Troop, 1st Brigade, Bengal Horse Artillery who fell in action with the mutineers at the Hindan river on the 31st May 1857, nobly doing their duty. This monument is erected by their Commanding Officer Colonel H. Tombs in token of esteem and regret.”

Bengal Horse Artillery. 2nd Brigade:

Lieutenant Augustus Otway Mayne – killed in action at Lucknow – 14th November 1857
Deputy-Asst-Quartermaster-General on the Staff of Brigadier Hope. Aged 28. Son of late Captain Charles Otway Mayne, of the Manor House, Great Stanmore, Middlesex.

Bengal Horse Artillery. 3rd Brigade:

Captain Edward Armstrong Currie D’Oyly – wounded at Sassiah – 5th July 1857. died of wounds 6th July at Agra. Ref The Times (4-9-57) died of a grape-shot wound at Agra 6th July.

Bengal Field Artillery :

Brigadier George Lewis Cooper – killed in action at Lucknow – 25th September 1857
Aged 45. Son of Major-General George (Bengal Army) and Jane, of London. Husband of Mary Griffin.

Colonel Francis Ruddle Bazely – killed in action at Lucknow – 25th September 1857
Aged 50. Son of Captain Henry (Royal Navy) and Mary, of Dover. Husband of Susan Denson.

Colonel Frederick Brind, CB. – wounded at Sealkote – 10th July 1857. died of wounds. Aged 56. Son of Walter Brind. Born in London. Served in the Gwalior, Sutlej and Punjab Campaigns. Husband of Henrietta Sale.

Colonel Sir Hugh Montgomery Lawrence, KCB. – wounded at Lucknow – 2nd July 1857. died of wounds 4th July 1857. Aged 50. Son of Lieut-Colonel Alexander and Catherine Lawrence. Husband of Honoria Marshall.

Lieutenant-Colonel Hubert Garbett – wounded at Delhi, 9th September 1857. died of infected wound at Simla – 14th January 1858. Aged 53. Son of Rev. James Garbett, of Hereford. Husband of Jessy Campbell.
Grave at Simla, New Cemetery – “Beneath this tomb are deposited the remains of Colonel Hubert Garbett of the Bengal Artillery who died at Simla on the 14th January 1858 from the effects of a wound received at the siege of Delhi where he served as a Brigadier commanding the artillery. Aged 53 years.”

Major George Larkins – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Aged 49. Son of John and Mary. Husband of Emma Carnaghan (she was also massacred at Cawnpore).

Major Alexander Robertson – wounded at Futteghur – 12th June 1857. died of wounds 21st July
Aged 37. Agent for Gun Carriages. Son of George Robertson, Deputy Keeper of Records for Scotland. Hi wife, Elizabeth and their infant daughter were also killed.

Captain Robert Charles Henry Baines Fagan – killed in action at Delhi – 12th September 1857
Aged 34. Son of Major-General Christopher Fagan, CB. Born at Fatehgarh. Served in the Punjab (1848). Husband of Sarah Humphrey.

Captain Alexander William Hawkins – murdered by mutineers at Moorar – 15th June 1857
Aged 44. Son of John and Ellen, of Dublin. Husband of Georgina Greene.

Captain Alfred P. Simons – wounded at Chinhut – 30th June 1857. Died at Lucknow 8th September 1857
Aged 33. Served in the Punjab Campaign (medal & 2 clasps).
Memorial at The Residency, Lucknow – “To the memory of Capt. A.P. Simons. Lt D.G. Alexander. Lt E.P. Lewin
Lt J.H. Bryce, Lt F.J. Cunliffe officers of the Bengal Artillery who died of wounds disease & exposure whilst defending the Residency Lucknow during the months of July Aug. and Sept. 1857 erected by their brother officers who survived the siege.”

Lieutenant Burnett Ashburner – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Sixth son of William Page Ashburner, formerly of Bombay.

Lieutenant St. G. Ashe – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Lieutenant Charles Dempster – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Lieutenant Dundas William Gordon – killed in action at Lucknow – 8th January 1858
Aged 24. Son of Adam Gordon, of London.

Lieutenant Edward Hildebrand – killed in action at Delhi – 8th September 1857
Aged 29. Born near Leicester.

Lieutenant John Henderson Lamb – wounded at Agra 5th July – died of wounds 24th August 1857
Aged 29. Assistant-Commissioner at Oraie. Son of David Lamb, of Liverpool.

Lieutenant Edward P. Lewin – killed in action at Lucknow – 26th July 1857
Memorial at The Residency, Lucknow – “To the memory of Capt. A.P. Simons. Lt D.G. Alexander. Lt E.P. Lewin, Lt J.H. Bryce, Lt F.J. Cunliffe officers of the Bengal Artillery who died of wounds disease & exposure whilst defending the Residency Lucknow during the months of July Aug. and Sept. 1857 erected by their brother officers who survived the siege.”

Lieutenant A.O. Mayne – killed in action at Lucknow – 14th November 1857

Lieutenant William Stewart – murdered by mutineers at Gwalior – 15th June 1857
Aged 30. From Ardvorlich, Perthsire. Son of Major W.M. Stewart, Bengal Army. His wife, Lucy, and infant son, Robert, were also killed.

Lieutenant Frederick Henry Turnbull – murdered by mutineers at Jhansi – 4th June 1857
Son of Montagu Henry Turnbull, late Bengal Civil Service.

Lieutenant George Dobson Willoughby – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857
Memorial at Bath Abbey, Bath – “Sacred to the memory of George Dobson Willoughby, 1st Lieut. Bengal Artillery and Commissary of Ordnance at Delhi, aged 28 years. As a brave and zealous soldier he stood firm in defence of his post intrusted to him, and when resistance failed blew up the Delhi Magazine on 11 May 1857 to prevent its falling into the hands of the mutineers and rebels. Burnt and wounded he subsequently fell a pray to insurgents. This tablet is erected by his sorrowing relatives.”

2nd Lieutenant F.W. Burney – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

2nd Lieutenant Thomas Eden Dickens – wounded at Delhi – 20th July 1857. died of wounds 27th July.
Fourth son of William Dickens, of Cherington, Warwickshire.
Grave at Rajpura Cemetery, Delhi – “In memory of Thomas Eden Dickens. Lieutenant Bengal Artillery, who fell mortally wounded before Delhi on the 20th and died on the 27th of July 1857. Aged 25 years.”

2nd Lieutenant J.A.H. Eckford – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

2nd Lieutenant John Nickleson Martin – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – “This tablet in memory of an excellent son, is erected by his afflicted parents, Admiral and Mrs Martin, to John Nickleson Martin Liuet. Bengal Artillery Who, whilst gallanty fulfilling his duties, was treacherously killed by the mutineers in the boats at Cawnpore, on the 27th of June 1857, in his 18th year, respected and beloved by all that knew him.”

2nd Lieutenant William Thornton Somerville – wounded at Delhi – 29th August 1857. died
Third and youngest son of James, of Ross, Co. Meath. Born 7th March 1836 in Ireland. Died of a fever.
Grave at Rajpura Cemetery, Delhi – “In memory of Lieut. W.T. Somoerville of the Bengal Artillery who died in camp before Delhi at the age of 21 years and 6 months on the 5th September 1857 of a fever brought on by fatigue and exposure, This monument has been erected by his affectionate friend Major General Huthwaite, CB.”

2nd Lieutenant George M.W. Sotheby – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Aged 17. Only son of Capt. George H. Sotheby, 34th Madras L.I.
Memorial at St. Johns Church, Clifton, Lancashire – “Also to Lieutenant George M.W. Sotherby, Bengal Artillery, son of the above, who was killed in the massacre at Cawnpore June 1857 aged 17 years.”

2nd Lieutenant Somerset Edward Deane Townsend – murdered by mutineers at Nowgong – 19th June 1857
 ‘shot through the heart by a dacoit, near Mahoba. Third son of the late Bishop of Meath.

Assistant-Surgeon R.H. Bartrum – killed in action at Lucknow – 26th September 1857

BENGAL ENGINEERS:

Captain Henry A. Brownlow – wounded at Delhi – 14th September 1857. died of wounds.

Captain E. Fraser – murdered by mutineers at Meerut – 10th May 1857

Captain G.W. Fulton – killed in action at Lucknow – 14th September 1857

Lieutenant Elliott Pakenham Brownlow – killed in a powder explosion at Delhi – 17th March 1858
Aged 24. Son of Henry Brownlow, of Bath.

Lieutenant Duncan Charles Home, VC – killed in a powder explosion at Allyghur – 29th September 1857 Aged 29. Son of Major-General Richard Home (Bengal Infantry), he was born at Jubbulpore. Joined the Bengal Army in 1846. Won the VC for blowing the Kashmir Gate before the final assault on Delhi (14th Sept.)

Lieutenant C.D. Innes – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 7th June 1857

Lieutenant S.C. Jervis – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Lieutenant J.R. Monckton – killed in action at Futtehghur – 12th July 1857
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – “Futtehgurh Fugitives 10th N.I. Colonel G.A. Smith Wife Child.
Major R. Monro. Major J. Phillott. Lieut C.W. Swetenham. Lieut D. Henderson. Ensign R.S. Byrne. Surgeon T.C. & Mrs Heathcote. Musician W.M. Wrixen. Colonel A. Coldie Wife & Daughters. Lieut J.R. Monckton B. Engr. Wife & Child. Asst-Surgeon S. & Mrs Maltby. Contr. M Roban Ordnance Dept. & Family. School Master Sheils & Family. Sergt. Hammond Gun Agency Dept. & Family. Pensioner Faulknor.”

Lieutenant Philip Salkeld, VC – wounded at Cashmere Gate, Delhi – 14th September 1857. died of wounds, 10th October at Delhi. Aged 26. Born in Dorset. Son of Rev. Robert Salkeld. Joined the Bengal Army in 1848. Won the VC for blowing the Kashmir Gate before the final assault on Delhi (14th Sept.)

Lieutenant Francis Latter Tandy – killed in action at Delhi – 14th September 1857
Aged 23. Son of Edward Tandy, Taxing Master in the Court of Chancery, Ireland. Joined the Bengal Army in 1853. Educated at Addiscombe.

Lieutenant Francis Whiting – killed – 28th June 1857
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – “In memory of Francis Whiting Capt Bengal Engineers who was shot by Mutinous Sepoys on the 28th June 1857 in the 35th year of his age one of the devoted band who defended Cawnpore and who was in command of a boat which escaped about 30 miles and fell while pushing her off a sand bank on which she had grounded.”

2nd Lieutenant Edward Jones – wounded at Delhi, 18th July, died of wounds – 24th July 1857
Aged 22. Mortally wounded by a cannon-shot. Son of Edward Jones, of Liverpool.
Grave in Rajpura Cemetery, Delhi – “Sacred to the memory of Lieutenant Edward Jones, Bengal Engineers, who was mortally wounded on the Ridge before Delhi on the 18th July and died on the 24th July 1857.”

July 29, 2022

Prateek Hira appointed member of Tourism & Medical Value Travel Committee of Govt of UP

Filed under: News — admins @ 8:41 am

https://travel.economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/destination/states/government-of-uttar-pradesh-appoints-prateek-hira-as-member-of-tourism-medical-value-travel-committee/93245658

 


 

Prateek Hira appointed as member of ‘Tourism and Medical Value Travel Committee’ of Govt. of Uttar Pradesh

 

Uttar Pradesh govt. has formed a high-level committee for export promotion through tourism and medical value travel under the Department of MSME and Export’s Export Promotion Council headed by the Commissioner of Exports.

Prateek Hira President and CEO of Tornos and Director of River Rhapsody who is a renowned name in the travel industry has been appointed as a member of this committee to provide his expertise in tourism and help the state of Uttar Pradesh augment service exports through tourism and medical travel.

Prateek Hira said, “Uttar Pradesh is taking tourism very seriously and trying to make tourism one of the key drivers to make the state a $1 trillion economy.”

Hira adds, “I am delighted to contribute my bit to the development of my own state and I really hope I would be able to contribute to the vision of our Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath.”

 
 

July 7, 2022

Coach Inclusions

Filed under: Uncategorized — admins @ 5:21 am

Standard Inclusions in our coaches are thoughtfully planned and come in without any extra or add-on costs.

   
   
bottled-water-in-ice-box

Unlimited supply of bottled water (250ml / 500 ml in bottle cooler ice-box). While additionally, aerated drinks, juices and fresh uncut fruits are placed for outstation trips on request but are chargeable in case of coaches though it is free in the cars.

Additionally watch this video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBfa-HX9Hz0

Umbrellas for sun and rain in all our coaches for guests to use.  umbrella-in-cars
hand-care-products Hand Sanitizer, Hand Moisturizer, Wet & Dry Tissue  
Disposable Face Mask & Gloves sealed in paper bags and Waste Disposal bags tucked in front seat pockets.  mask-and-waste-disposal-bag
covid-safety-instructions

Our transport (cars & coaches) complies with ‘COVID-19 Safeguard Standards’ as part of Stage-2 of cleanliness & hygiene standards.- Please refer  https://www.tornosindia.com/tornos-covid-19-sanitisation-guidelines/

Tornos is committed to Safe Travel and certified by WTTC for the same bearing ‘Safe Travel Stamp’

Tornos uses certified First-Aid Kits. Please watch this video to understand the concept : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBfa-HX9Hz0 tornos-certified-first-aid-box
list-of-standard-inclusions-in-first-aid-box

List of inclusions in Certified First-Aid Box. Our First-Aid Box also includes sanitary pads for a lady guests. Understand our First Aid Kit : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBfa-HX9Hz0

 

Tornos - Safe Travel Stamp

 

July 1, 2022

Indian Mutiny Casualties List (Bengal Infantry)

Filed under: Lucknowledge — admins @ 9:37 am

Indian Mutiny 1857 – 9

THE BENGAL INFANTRY:

1st Bengal European Fusiliers

Memorial at Sadar Bazar, Delhi – “Here repose the following officer, non commissioned officers and men of the 1st Bengal Fusiliers killed in the attack on the enemys fortified position at Kissen-gunge on the morning of the successful assault and storm of Delhi. Captain G.G. McBarnett 55th N.I. (attached)” … (names of 19 men) … “Familiar with the aspect of Death whom they had confonted in so many battles from which they always emerged victorious they met His last inevitable call here with intrepidity Falling on the 14th of September 1857 in the faithful discharge of their duty. This Monument was erected by their Officers and fellow soldiers of the 1st Regiment European Bengal Fusiliers in their remembrance which is part of its glory. The rest remains with the Lord.”

Lieutenant-Colonel John Grant Gerrard – killed in action at Narnool – 17th November 1857
Son of John & Harriet Gerrard. Born in Calcutta, 1808. Joined the Bengal Army in 1825. Served Afghanistan 1842 (medal), Sutlej 1845 (medal). Husband of Mary Bunbury.
Memorial at Meerut –
 “Sacred to the memory of Lieut-Colonel John Grant Gerrard, 1st Bengal Fusiliers, who was killed in action while gallantly leading on to victory the moveable column which he commanded against the Jodhpur Legion at Narnaul, near Delhi, November 17th 1857, aged 48 years.”

Major George Ogle Jacob – mortally wounded at Delhi – 14th September 1857
Aged 38. Son of Surgeon George Jacob (Bengal Medical Service). Joined the Bengal Army in 1837. Served in Afghanistan (1838), Sutlej (1845). Wounded in the morning and died in camp at 10 pm.
Grave at Rajpura Cemetery, Delhi –
 “Sacred to the memory of Major George Ogle Jacob, 1st Bengal Fusiliers, who whilst commanding his Regiment fell mortally wounded at the storming of Delhi, on the 14th September 1857, aged 38 years. This monument is erected by his family.”

Captain William Hodson – killed in action at Begam Kothi – 11th March 1858

Captain Etienne St. George – wounded at Chakar Kothi – 9th March 1858. died of wounds

2nd Bengal European Fusiliers

Memorial in St. James’ Church, Delhi – “In defence of the honor of their beloved Queen and country in avenging their murdered countrymen and women, in crushing a mutiny unrivalled for its atrocities and in the final assault and capture of the city of Delhi, the brave soldiers of the 2nd European Bengal Fusiliers in whose memory this tablet is erected fell. Followed to the grave by the sympathies of their nation, and the undying love of their surviving comrades they lie in glorious sacrifice to their country. To perpetuate the memory of Colonel Major General N. Penny CB. Captain E.J. White. Captain R.J. Sanctuary 5th N.I. Lieutenant C.T.M. MacDowell. Lieutenant G.J. Glanville. Lieutenant S.H. Jackson. Lieutenant D.F. Sheriff. Lieutenant O.C. Walters 45th N.I. Lieutenant C.H.E. Gambier 38th N.I. Asst Surgeon W.B. Chavasse.”

Colonel Nicholas Penny, CB – killed in action – Killed in action at Kukerowlee – 30th April 1858.
Aged 69. Son of Robert & Catherine Penny, of Weymouth, Dorset. Joined Bengal Army 1806. Husband of Louisa Gerard.
Grave at Meerut –
 “Sacred to the memory of Major General N. Penny, CB. Commanding the Meerut Division. Born at Weymouth, Dorsetshire on the 12th March 1790, Killed at the head of his column in a skirmish with the enemy near the village of Kukerowlee, in Rolilcund, on the morning of the 30th April 1858 after a service of 51 years. His precious remains were brought to Meerut through the kind exertions of Captain E.J. Simpson Asst Commy Gen.”

Lieutenant Charles Henry Fitzroy Gambier – killed in action at Delhi – 14th September 1857.
Aged 22. When his regiment (38th N.I.) mutineed he was attached to the 2nd Bengal Fusiliers. Killed in the attack on the breach of the Water Bastion 14th September 1857. See 38th Native Infantry.

Lieutenant George Julius Glanville – murdered in the massacre at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857.
Aged 25. Son of Francis and Amabel, of Cornwall.

Lieutenant Stuart Hare Jackson – killed in action at Delhi – 23rd June 1857.
Aged 19. Joined the Bengal Army in 1855. Third son of the late A.R. Jackson, MD of Warley Barracks.
Buried at Rajpura Cemetery, Delhi –
 “Beneath this lies the mortal remains of Lieut. S.H. Jackson 2nd EB Fusiliers killed in action against the rebels on 23rd June 1857 during the siege of Delhi. erected by his brother officers as a mark of deep esteem.”

Lieutenant Charles T. McDowell – killed in action at Shumshabad – 27th January 1858
Aged 23. Second-in-command of Hodson’s Horse. Son of James McDowell, of London and East Bridgeford, Notts.

2nd Lieutenant David Francis Sherriff – killed in action at Delhi – 12th August 1857.
Aged 21. Son of Captain David Sherriff, 48th N.I. Born at Sitapur. Joined the Bengal Army in 1855.
Buried in Rajpura Cemetery, Delhi –
 “Sacred to the memory of Lieut. D.F. Sherriff H.M. 2nd E.B. Fusiliers killed in action against the rebels during the siege of Delhi on 12th August 1857 erected by his brother officers as a mark of their esteem and regard for him.”

Ensign Odlarne Coates Walter – killed in action at Delhi – 18th July 1857.
Aged 19. Joined the Bengal Army in 1856.

3rd Bengal European Fusiliers

Major George Powell Thomas – wounded at Agra, 5th July 1857. died of wounds 4th August 1857.
Aged 48. Son of Lewis and Maria Thomas. Born in Bairamghat, near Lucknow. Husband of Albina Andrews.

1st Bengal Native Infantry
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – 
“To the glory of God and in memory of more than a thousand Christian people, who met their deaths hard by, between 6th June & 15th July 1857. These tablets are placed in this the
Memorial Church. All Souls Cawnpore by the Government N.W.P. 1st Native Infantry. Lieut. Col. John Ewart, Wife & Child. Lieut J.H.C. Ewart, 12th N.I. Captain A. Turner, Wife and Child. Captain E.J. Elms. Lieut. H.S. Smith. Lieut. R.M. Satchwell. Lieut F. Redman. Ensign J.C. Supple. Surgeon A.W.R. Newenman, Wife & Children Sergeant Major C. Hilling, Wife & Child Quarter-Master Sergeant T. Andrews & Family 18 Musicians, 5 Women & 9 Children.”

Colonel John Ewart – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Aged 53. Son of Peter and Marianne, of Manchester. Husband of Emma Fooks. (she and their daughter were also massacred at Cawnpore). Wounded at Cawnpore and killed in the boats.

Captain Edward John Elms – murdered at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Aged 33. Son of the late Revd. Edward Elms, of Itchingfield, Sussex.

Captain Athill Turner – murdered at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Died of wounds received in the boats. His wife, Ellen, and daughter died of fever at Cawnpore.

Lieutenant Frederick Redman – murdered at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Aged 26. Son of George C. Redman, Isle of Thanet, Kent.

Lieutenant Richard Murcott Satchwell – murdered at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Aged 28. Adjutant and Quartermaster. Son of the late Major Satchwell, Asst-Comm-General, Bengal.

Lieutenant Henry Sidney Smith – murdered at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Lieutenant Godfrey Richard Wheeler – murdered at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – 
“To the glory of God and in memory of more than a thousand Christian people, who met their deaths hard by, between 6th June & 15th July 1857. These tablets are placed in this the
Memorial Church. All Souls Cawnpore by the Government N.W.P.
Staff. Major Genl. Sir H. Wheeler K.C.B. Lady Wheeler & daughters. Lieut G.R. Wheeler 1st N.I. A.D.C. Lieut Col. E. Wiggens 52nd N.I. D.J.A.G. Mrs Wiggens. Major W. Lindsay A.A.G. Mrs Lindsay & Daughters. Ensign G. and Mrs Lindsay. Brigadier General Jack C.B. Mr Jack. Capt. Sir G. Parker 74th N.I. Cant. Magistr. Capt Williamson 71st N.I. D.A.C.G. Mrs Williamson & Child.”

Ensign George Lindsay – murdered at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Only son of the late George Lindsay, Bengal Civil Service.
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – 
“To the glory of God and in memory of more than a thousand Christian people, who met their deaths hard by, between 6th June & 15th July 1857. These tablets are placed in this the
Memorial Church. All Souls Cawnpore by the Government N.W.P.
Staff. Major Genl. Sir H. Wheeler K.C.B. Lady Wheeler & daughters. Lieut G.R. Wheeler 1st N.I. A.D.C. Lieut Col. E. Wiggens 52nd N.I. D.J.A.G. Mrs Wiggens. Major W. Lindsay A.A.G. Mrs Lindsay & Daughters. Ensign G. and Mrs Lindsay. Brigadier General Jack C.B. Mr Jack. Capt. Sir G. Parker 74th N.I. Cant. Magistr. Capt Williamson 71st N.I. D.A.C.G. Mrs Williamson & Child.”

Ensign J.C. Supple – murdered at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

3rd Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant Robert Waller Alexander – killed in action at Delhi – 19th June 1857
Son of Rev. Robert Alexander.
Grave at Rajpura Cemetery, Delhi –
 “Sacred to the memory of Robert Waller Alexander 3rd NI. Son of Revd. R. Alexander of Blackheath Ireland who was killed before Delhi on the night of the 19th June 1857 whilst gallantly engaged in repelling an attack made by the mutineers on the British outposts.

Lieutenant James Yorke – wounded at Delhi, 19th June 1857. died of wounds 1st July 1857
Attached to the 4th Sikh Infantry.

6th Bengal Native Infantry

Captain John Plunkett – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 7th June 1857
Youngest son of William Plunkett, Deputy Chairman of the Board of Inland Revenue.

Lieutenant George Harry Hawes – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 7th June 1857
Aged 25. Quartermaster and Interpreter. Son of William Hawes, of Plymouth.

Lieutenant Robert Stewart – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 7th June 1857
Murdered while at mess. Son of late Robert Stewart, formerly of Calcutta.

Ensign Thomas Bailiff – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 7th June 1857

Ensign Edward E. Beamont – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 7th June 1857

Ensign Arthur M. H. Cheek – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 7th June 1857

Ensign George Lloyd Munro – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 7th June 1857
Eldest son of Lt-Col. O.A. Munro, Bengal Army.

Ensign George Stewart Pringle – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 7th June 1857
Third son of the late W.A. Pringle, Bengal Civil Service.

Ensign Edward M. Smith – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 7th June 1857

7th Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant Frederick Blackall Boyd – killed in action at Behar – 9th November 1857
Aged 27. Son of Robert Boyd, of Bromley, Kent.

Lieutenant Ralph Mitford Ingilby – murdered by mutineers at Dinapore – 30th July 1857

Lieutenant William Paul – wounded at Lucknow, 16th November 1857. died of wounds 17th Nov. 1857
Aged 29. Born in Elgin.

Lieutenant Charles Henry Lycett Warren – killed in action at Lucknow – 26th September 1857
Son of Joseph Loxdale Warren, of The Towers, Market Drayton, Shropshire. Aged 24.
Memorial at St Mary’s Church, Market Drayton, Shropshire – 
“In memory of Charles Henry Lycett Warren Lieutenant in the 8th Bengal Native Infantry and Adjutant of the 12th Bengal Irregular Cavalry son of Joseph Loxdale Warren of the Towers in this Parish Esquire who fell shot through the heart while advancing with the Army under Major General Sir H. Havelock to the Relief of his countrymen besieged in the Residency at Lucknow on the 25th of September 1857 aged 24 years. This tablet is erected by his friends and fellow townsmen in memory of the zeal and spirit and evinced throuhgout the arduous campign which led to the reconquest of Lucknow and the rescue of the besieged from a savage and merciless foe.”

8th Bengal Native Infantry

Captain Charles Frederick Simpson – accidentally killed at Delhi – 19th November 1857
Aged 32. Son of Richard Simpson, of Derby. Joined the Bengal Army in 1845.
Grave at Cashmere Gate Cemetery, Delhi –
 “Sacred to the memory of Lieutenant Charles F. Simpson 8th Regiment NI. Major of Brigade Umballa who died at Delhi the 19th November 1857 aged 32 years. Sincerely and deservedly regretted by his affectionate wife and numerous friends.”

Lieutenant Charles Henry Lycett Warreb – killed in action at Lucknow – 23rd September 1857
Memorial at St. Marys Church, Market Drayton, Shropshire – “In memory of Charles Henry Lycett Warren, Lieutenant in the 8th Bengal Native Infantry and Adjutant of the 12th Bengal Irregular Cavalry, son of Joseph Loxdale Warren of the Towers in this parish, who fell shot through the heart whilst advancing with the Army under Major General Sir H. Havelock to the relief of his countrymen beseiged in the Residency at Lucknow, on the 23rd September 1857, aged 24 years. This tablet is erected by his friends and fellow townsmen.”

9th Bengal Native Infantry

Major Lionel Percy Denham Eld – wounded on the Trunk Road – July 1857. died ‘of wounds’ at Weymouth, 11th December 1863
Aged 55. Son of John and Louisa, of Brighton. Husband of Charlotte Campbell.

Lieutenant Frederick Folliot Oldfield – died of wounds at Secundra Bagh, Lucknow – 17th November 1857. Aged 19. Son of Henry Oldfield (Bengal Civil Service). Born in Mozaffarpur. Joined the Bengal Army in 1855.

10th Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant-Colonel George Acklom Smith – missing in action at July – 26th July 1857
His wife Mary was also killed.
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – 
“Futtehgurh Fugitives 10th N.I. Colonel G.A. Smith Wife Child.
Major R. Monro. Major J. Phillott. Lieut C.W. Swetenham. Lieut D. Henderson. Ensign R.S. Byrne. Surgeon T.C. & Mrs Heathcote. Musician W.M. Wrixen. Colonel A. Coldie Wife & Daughters. Lieut J.R. Monckton B. Engr. Wife & Child. Asst-Surgeon S. & Mrs Maltby. Contr. M Roban Ordnance Dept. & Family. School Master Sheils & Family. Sergt. Hammond Gun Agency Dept. & Family. Pensioner Faulknor.”

Captain Frederick D’Oyley Bignell – missing at Futtehghur – 26th July 1858

Captain William George Law – killed in action at Delhi – 23rd July 1857 (attached to the 1st Punjab Infantry). Aged 33. Son of William Law. Joined the Bengal Army in 1841. Served with the 1st Punjab Infantry. Grave at Rajpura Cemetery, Delhi – “Amongst the brave soldiers who gave their lives for their country at the siege of Delhi in 1857, none more gallant amd true-hearted have here rest from their labours than Captain W.G. Law who was killed at the attack on the rebels’ position in the Metcalfe Garden on the 23rd July.”

Captain William Lindsay – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 18th June 1857

Captain Robert Munro – murdered by mutineers at Futtehghur – 26th July 1857

Captain William Thornton Phillimore – missing at Futtehghur – 26th July 1857
Aged 36. Son of William Phillimore, of Herts. Shot in the leg at Ferruckabad. Killed while in a boat at Konahere Bithoor.

Captain Johnson Phillott – missing at Futtehghur – 11th July 1857
Aged 47. Reported to have drowned in the Ganges while escaping mutineers. Son of Johnson Phillott, of Hereford.

Lieutenant Henry John Fitzgerald – murdered by mutineers at Futtehghur – 26th July 1857

Lieutenant John Robert Simpson – murdered by mutineers at Futtehghur – 26th July 1857
Son of the late Colonel John Simpson, HEICS.

Lieutenant Charles Worsley Swetenham – murdered by mutineers at Futtehghur – 26th July 1857

Lieutenant Edward S. Whish – murdered at Darjeeling – 16th June 1857
Second son of late Lieut-General Whish, of Clifton, Gloucestershire. (ref. The Times)

Ensign R. S. Byrne – murdered by mutineers at Futtehghur – 26th July 1857

Ensign David Henderson – murdered by mutineers at Futtehghur – 26th July 1857
Acting Adjutant, Interpreter and Quartermaster. Son of Capt. Henderson, of Semster, Caithness.

11th Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant-Colonel John Finnis – murdered by mutineers at Meerut – 10th May 1857
Aged 53. Son of Robert and Elizabeth Finnis, of Hythe. Born 28th January 1804. Served Punjab 1848 (medal). The first European officer killed in the Mutiny. Husband of Sarah Roche.
Grave at Meerut –
 “To the memory of John Finnis Colonel 11th Regt N.I. who fell while endeavouring to quell the mutiny in the 20th Regt. N.I. May 10th 1857 aged 53 years.”

12th Bengal Native Infantry

Captain John Dunlop – murdered by mutineers at Jhansi – 5th June 1857
Aged 34. Son of

Lieutenant James H. C. Ewart – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Aged 31. Eldest son of James S. Ewart, of Fortis Green, Finchley.
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – 
“To the glory of God and in memory of more than a thousand Christian people, who met their deaths hard by, between 6th June & 15th July 1857. These tablets are placed in this the
Memorial Church. All Souls Cawnpore by the Government N.W.P. 1st Native Infantry. Lieut. Col. John Ewart, Wife & Child. Lieut J.H.C. Ewart, 12th N.I. Captain A. Turner, Wife and Child. Captain E.J. Elms. Lieut. H.S. Smith. Lieut. R.M. Satchwell. Lieut F. Redman. Ensign J.C. Supple. Surgeon A.W.R. Newenman, Wife & Children Sergeant Major C. Hilling, Wife & Child Quarter-Master Sergeant T. Andrews & Family 18 Musicians, 5 Women & 9 Children.”

Lieutenant William C. L. Ryves – murdered by mutineers at Jhansi – 5th June 1857

Ensign James Henry Barber – murdered by mutineers at Jhansi – 5th June 1857
The Times 22-8-57, states: died 20th June in Bundelcund from sun-stroke while seeking refuge from the mutineers. Eldest son of Capt. Barber, of Merton Abbey, Surrey.

Ensign Stanhope B. Taylor – murdered by mutineers at Jhansi – 5th June 1857

Assistant-Surgeon William Barker McEgan – murdered by mutineers at Jhansi – 5th June 1857.
Born 30th May 1817. Served in the Crimea with the Turkish Contingent.

13th Bengal Native Infantry

Memorial in the Residency, Lucknow – “Sacred to the memory of Major C.F. Bruere. Captain R.B. Francis. Lieut G.W. Green. Ensign L. Inglis of the Honble E.I. Company’s 13th Regt N.I. who fell whilst serving with their Regiment in the defence of Lucknow 1857. Also of Capt A. Turnbull who died in the Cawnpore Entrenchment and Lieut E.W. Banwell.”

Captain Robert Bransby Francis – killed in action by round shot at Lucknow – 8th July 1857
Both his legs were blown off by a round-shot.

Lieutenant Edward William Banwell – murdered by mutineers at Hissar – 29th May 1857

Lieutenant G.A.P. Younghusband – wounded at Futteyghur 2nd January 1858. Died of wounds 4th Jan.
Aged 26. Son of Major-General Younghusband, Royal Artillery. Commanding 5th Punjab Cavalry when wounded.

14th Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant Charles Battine – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Aged 24. Son of Major-General Battine, CB, Bengal Artillery.

Lieutenant Frederick James MacDonnell – killed in action at Lucknow – 23rd March 1857

15th Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant James Archibald Campbell – murdered by mutineers at Nusseerabad – 6th May 1857
Aged 24. Killed while commanding the 14th Irregular Cavalry. Eldest son of Lt-Col. John Campbell (retired), Bengal Army.

Lieutenant Osbert D’Abitot Thackwell – killed in action at Lucknow – 20th March 1858
Aged 22. Son of Lt-General Sir Joseph Thackwell, GCB, 16th Lancers.

16th Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant Frederick Cortland Angelo – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – 
“Sacred to the memory of Frederick Cortlandt Angelo 16th Grenadiers, B.N.I., ..nt of the 4th Division Ganges Canal, who fell in the mutiny at Cawnpore, on the 27th June 1857, in the 32nd year of his age, erected by his sorrowing widow.”

Lieutenant James Fullerton – accidentally killed at Lucknow – 15th September 1857
Aged 27. Son of Lord Fullerton. Fell from a balcony of the Residency.

Ensign H. L. Marsh – killed in action at Maun Sing’s Garden – 24th August 1857

17th Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant Robert Popkin Homfray – wounded at Delhi, 15th September 1857. died of wounds 16th September 1857
Aged 22. Son of Robert, he was born in Calcutta. Joined the Bengal Army in 1852.
Grave at Rajpura Cemetery, Delhi –
 “This monument is erected to the memory of Lieut. Robt Popkin Homfary of the 17th Regt. NI and adjt. of the 4th Punjaub Infantry, by his devoted brothers and sisters. this brave young officer died at the age of 22 years on the 16th September 1857 from wounds received on the preceding day whilst gallantly leading on his men in action.”

Lieutenant Percy George Hutchinson – murdered by mutineers at Azimghur – 3rd June 1857
Quartermaster. Aged 25.

Lieutenant Edward Thomas Kemp – wounded at Sassia Ghat, 15th January 1857. died at Mela Ghat, 16th January. (attached to the Kamaon Levy). Aged 22. Joined the Bengal Army in 1853.

Lieutenant E. D. F. Lewis – wounded at Ghazeepore, 18th July 1857. died of wounds 1st September 1857

18th Bengal Native Infantry

Major Henry Edward Pearson – murdered by ‘villagers’ near Bareilly – 6th June 1857
Aged 46. Son of Rev. Thomas and Sarah, of Worcestershire. Husband of Fanny Williamson.

Captain Hugh Vans Hathorn – murdered by ‘villagers’ near Bareilly – 6th June 1857
Only son of the late Vans Hathorn, of Edinburgh.

Captain Taylor Campbell Richardson – murdered by ‘villagers’ near Bareilly – 6th June 1857

Lieutenant Henry Ross Stewart – murdered by ‘villagers’ near Bareilly – 6th June 1857
Memorial at St. Michaels Church, Melksham, Wiltshire –
 “Sacred to the memory of Lieutenant Henry Ross Stewart, 18th Regt BNI who lost his life whilst endeavouring to escape from Bareilly after the Mutiny of May 31st aged 26 years.”

Ensign Charles Keith Dashwood – wounded at Lucknow, 23rd November 1857. died of wounds
Died in hsopital at Lucknow, having had both his feet blown off by a round-shot on 4th November. Aged 19. Son of Lt-Col. A.W. Dashwood, of Shenley Grange, Herts.

Ensign John Charles Dyson – murdered by ‘villagers’ at Bareilly – 6th June 1857

19th Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant Sir Norman Leslie – murdered by mutineers at Rohnee – 12th June 1857
Murdered by men of the 5th Irregular Cavalry with whom he was serving. The murderers were caught and executed.

20th Bengal Native Infantry

Captain Donald McDonald – murdered by mutineers at Meerut – 10th May 1857
Fourth son of Capt. Archibald McDonald (RN).
Grave at Meerut –
 “To the memory of Donald MacDonald Captain 20th Regiment N.I. who was killed by his own men on the 10th May 1857. Aged 35 years. and of Louisa Sophia, his wife, aged 30 years. Who was barabarously murdered the same night while trying to make her escape with her three infants from her burning house to the European Lines.”

Captain John Henry George Taylor – murdered by mutineers at Meerut – 10th May 1857
Son of Lieutenant-Colonel John William and Emma Taylor. Born in 1820.
Grave at Meerut –
 “To the memory of John Henry George Taylor Captain Late of the 20th Regiment N.I. Killed during the Mutiny at Meerut on May 10th 1857.”

Lieutenant George Douglas Barbor – killed in action at Lucknow – 1st June 1857

Lieutenant David Henry Henderson – murdered by mutineers at Meerut – 10th May 1857
Only son of Lieut. David Henderson, R.N., of St. John’s Wood, Regents Park.
Grave at Meerut –
 “Sacred to the memory of David Henry Henderson Lieutenant Bengal Native Infantry who was killed during the mutiny at Meerut on the 10th May 1857, aged 31 years.”

Lieutenant Mervyn Archdall Humphrys – killed in action at Delhi – 19th June 1857
(attached to the 1/60th Foot). Aged 26. Son of William and Anna, of Co. Cavan. Joined the Bengal Army in 1850. Grave in Rajpura Cemetery, Delhi –
 “Sacred to the memory of Lieutenant M. A. Humphrys of the 20th N.I. who was killed in action on the 19th June 1857.”

Lieutenant William Pattle – murdered by mutineers at Meerut – 10th May 1857.
Grave at Meerut –
 “William Pattle Lieutenant. 20th Regiment Native Infantry. Born 21st June 1832 was killed in the Mutiny at Meerut on 10th May 1857.”

21st Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant Francis Walker Brodie – murdered by mutineers at Muttragur – 7th June 1857

22nd Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant J.W.H. Anderson – murdered by mutineers at Gorukpore – 8th June 1857
Son of John Anderson, of Ryall Hill, Worcester.

Lieutenant Arthur Bright – murdered by mutineers at Gorukpore – 8th June 1857
Aged 26. Son of Robert Bright, of Abbot’s Leigh, Somerset. Killed by mutineers of the 17th BNI.
Memorial at Holy Trinity Church, Abbots Leigh, Avon  –
 “In memory of Arthur, 6th son of Robert and Caroline Bright, Lieutenant and Adjutant of the 22nd Regiment of Bengal Native Infantry full of the highest promise he perished by the hands of mutineers from another regment near Fyzabad Oudh on the 9th of June 1857 in the 27th year of his age.”

Lieutenant George Lister Cautley – murdered by mutineers at Gorukpore – 8th June 1857
Aged 24. Son of Lt-Col. George Cautley, 6th Bengal Cavalry.

Lieutenant Augustus Frederic English – murdered by mutineers at Gorukpore – 8th June 1857
Son of the late Sir John English.

Lieutenant Thomas Edward Lindesay – murdered by mutineers at Gorukpore – 8th June 1857

Lieutenant Frederick W. Ripley – murdered by mutineers at Gorukpore – 8th June 1857

Lieutenant Walter Harrington Thomas – murdered by mutineers at Gorukpore – 8th June 1857
Son of Capt. G.H. Thomas, 7th Madras Cavalry.

23rd Bengal Native Infantry

Colonel John Platt – murdered by mutineers at Mhow – 1st July 1857
Aged 55. Son of Rev. Alexander and Charlotte Platt, of Langley, Herts. Husband of Charlotte Atkinson.
Memorial at St. Marys church, Watford – 
“In memory of Lt col. John Platt, Lt Col Charles Chester, Capt. James Fagan, Capt. Thom H. Hilliard all of the XXIII Regt Bengal Native Infantry who fell in the Mutiny and Rebellion in India AD MDCCCLVIII. Erected by their brother officers.”

Captain James Fagan – murdered by mutineers at Mhow – 1st July 1857

Captain Thomas Holyoake Hilliard – murdered at Chatteerea – 31st May 1857
Aged 30. Born in Middlesex. Joined the Bengal Army in 1842. Adjutant of the Hariana Light infantry. When they mutineed at Sirsa he was spared and allowed to depart, but was murdered by villagers soon after.
Grave at Sirsa Cemetery –
 “Sacred to the memory of Lieut. J.H. Hilliard, second in command, late Hurrianah battalion and Mr. J.W. Fell, Assistant Patrol, Customs Department, who were both treacherously murdered on the 30th May 1857 by the rebel inhabitants of the village of Chutrayan in the Sirsa District. this tomb was erected over the recovered remains by order of the Government.”

24th Bengal Native Infantry

Ensign Marshall Deverall Smith – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 7th June 1857
Aged 19 years and 4 months. Son of Samuel Smith, of Westbourne Terrace Road, London, late of Calcutta.

25th Bengal Native Infantry

Captain Charles George Brodie – killed in action at Mehidpore – 18th November 1857

Ensign Julian Hayter – wounded at Benares, 16th June 1857. died of wounds

26th Bengal Native Infantry

Major Robert Spencer – murdered by mutineers at Mean Meer – 30th July 1857
Aged 44. Born in London. Son of Robert and Anne. Joined the Bengal Army in 1827.
Tablet in St. Mary Magdalene’s Church, Lahore –
 “Sacred to the memory of Brigadier Isaac Handscombe, Bt. Major Robert Spencer and Sergeant Major John Potter who were barbarously murdered by the mutineers when nobly attempting to recall their men to their duty, the first fell at Lucknow on the 31st May and the two last at Meean Meer on the 30th July 1857.”

Lieutenant John Tierney Davidson – killed in action at Delhi – 14th September 1857
(attached to the 2nd Punjab Infantry). Aged 18 years & 9 weeks.
Tablet in St. Mary Magdalene’s Church, Lahore –
 “To the memory of Ensign John Tierney Davidson who was killed at Delhi on 14th Septr 1857.”

27th Bengal Native Infantry

Captain George Thomas Gowan – killed in action in Oude – 8th June 1857
Memorial at St. Pauls Cathedral, Calcutta – 
“To the beloved memory of George Thomas Gowan Captain of the 27th Regiment Bengal Native Infantry and commandant 9th regiment Oude Irregular Force, second son of Major Genl G.E. Gowan Bengal Artillery, Killed at Topore, Oude, June 1857 in the 35th year of his age He fell whilst endeavouring to recall the mutinous sepoys of his own force to order and obedience. And also to the memory of Olivia Grace daughter of Major General James Stuart Bengal Army and wife of Captain G.T. Gowan who with their infant son George Boyce Combe cruelly murdered by the rebels at Tapore June 1857 “

Captain John Nicholson – wounded at Delhi, 14th September 1857. died of wounds 23rd September.

Lieutenant George William Fraser – missing in action in Oude – 8th June 1857

28th Bengal Native Infantry

Captain Henry John Guise – killed in action at Benares – 4th June 1857
Attached to the 13th Irregular Cavalry.

Captain Marshall James – murdered by mutineers at Shahjehanpore – 31st October 1857
Killed in church. Aged 37. Only son of Lt-Col. James, HEIC, of Saltford House, Bath.

Captain Cornelius Lysaght – murdered by mutineers at Mohumdee – 23rd June 1857

Captain Mordant M. Salmon – murdered by mutineers at Mohumdee – 23rd June 1857

Captain H. W. L. Sneyd – murdered by mutineers at Shahjehanpore – 31st October 1857

Lieutenant George James Johnston – murdered by mutineers at Mohumdee – 23rd June 1857

Lieutenant Alexander Key – murdered by mutineers at Mohumdee – 23rd June 1857
Eldest son of John Key, Grosvenor Place, London. His wife Mary was also killed.

Lieutenant William W. Pitt – murdered by mutineers at Mohumdee – 23rd June 1857

Lieutenant Colin A. Robertson – murdered by mutineers at Mohumdee – 23rd June 1857

Lieutenant George W. Rutherford – murdered by mutineers at Mohumdee – 23rd June 1857

Lieutenant Edmund Cadell Scott – murdered by mutineers at Mohumdee – 23rd June 1857
Aged 18 years and 2 months. Son of Major G.D. Scott, of Winkfield, Berkshire.

Ensign Thomas John Hope Spens – murdered by mutineers at Mohumdee – 23rd June 1857
Aged 21. Only son of the late Thomas Spens, MD, HEICS.

30th Bengal Native Infantry

Captain John Tower Lumsden – killed in action at Lucknow – 16th November 1857

Lieutenant Jonathan Cape – killed in action at Lucknow – 20th March 1858

31st Bengal Native Infantry

Colonel Alexander Jack – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857.
Aged 51. Son of Rev. William and Grace Jack, of Aberdeen.
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – 
“To the glory of God and in memory of more than a thousand Christian people, who met their deaths hard by, between 6th June & 15th July 1857. These tablets are placed in this the
Memorial Church. All Souls Cawnpore by the Government N.W.P.
Staff. Major Genl. Sir H. Wheeler K.C.B. Lady Wheeler & daughters. Lieut G.R. Wheeler 1st N.I. A.D.C. Lieut Col. E. Wiggens 52nd N.I. D.J.A.G. Mrs Wiggens. Major W. Lindsay A.A.G. Mrs Lindsay & Daughters. Ensign G. and Mrs Lindsay. Brigadier General Jack C.B. Mr Jack. Capt. Sir G. Parker 74th N.I. Cant. Magistr. Capt Williamson 71st N.I. D.A.C.G. Mrs Williamson & Child.”

Captain Thomas Charles Birch – murdered by mutineers at Pophamon – 7th June 1857.
Aged 42. Son of John and Anna Birch, of Calcutta. Born in Bengal. Husband of Caroline Amesbury.

Captain Charles M. Parsons – murdered by mutineers at Oude – 8th June 1857.
Attached to the 6th Oude Irregular Infantry.

Ensign Henry George Wadham Spens – killed in an explosion at Bundlekund – 23rd June 1857

32nd Bengal Native Infantry

Captain Charles Robert George Douglas – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857
Aged 33. Husband of Louisa Robinson.

Lieutenant Henry C. A. Cooper – murdered by mutineers at Deoghur – 9th October 1857

Lieutenant John Egremont Lee – killed in action in Oude – 21st March 1858
Memorial at Kells Parish Church, Galloway – “Erected by Jane C. Maitland in loving memory of her husband, John Gordon Maitland …. Also of her brother Lieut. John Egremont Lee, 32nd Bengal Native Infantry, during the Indian Mutiny he was killed in an attack on the Fort of Tirowlee, Oude, 21st March 1858, aged 27 years.”

Lieutenant Henry Strickland Lester – wounded at Lucknow – 14th July 1857. died of wounds
Aged 30. Assistant-Commissioner of Seetapore. Son of Lt. J.Y. Lester, 7th Royal Fusiliers. Wounded during a rebel assault on Gubbin’s Post.

Lieutenant Eaton Joseph Travers – killed in action at Delhi – 3rd August 1857
Attached to the 1st Punjab Infantry. Aged 29. Son of Major-General Robert Travers, KCMG, CB (Rifle Brigade). Joined the Bengal Army in 1845. Husband of Harriet Aylmer.
Grave at Rajpura Cemetery, Delhi –
 “Lieutenant E.J. Travers killed in the advanced trenches at Hindu Rao’s house, on the 2nd August.”

Ensign George Edward Hill – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

33rd Bengal Native Infantry

Major John Sherbrooke Banks – killed at Lucknow, shot in the head – 21st July 1857
Chief Commissioner of Lucknow. Aged 46. Son of Samuel and Lucinda. Husband of Elizabeth Fearon.

Lieutenant John Hugh Browne – killed in action at Delhi – 6th August 1857
Attached to the Kemoon Battalion. Aged 28 years & 5 months. Son of John Browne, of Gray’s Inn (barrister).

35th Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant Frederick John Salmon Bagshaw – wounded at Jullundur, 7th June 1857. died of wounds 12th June. Aged 30. Fought in the Sutlej Campaign (1846) and Punjab Campaign (1848). Son of Revd. W.S. Bagshaw, rector of Thrapston.

36th Bengal Native Infantry

Brevet Major Thomas Mould Edgar Moorhouse – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 4th June 1857 Aged 49. Son of John and Eliza, of London. Husband of Fanny Fitzgerald.

Lieutenant Arthur Wellesley Craigie – wounded at Narnaul, 16th November 1857. died of wounds, 30th November at Delhi. Aged 24. Son of George, of Perth.
Grave at Cashmere Gate Cemetery, Delhi –
 “Sacred to the memory of Arthur Wellesley Craigie youngest son of George Clark Craigie Esqr. of Dumbarnie, Perthshire, Scotland Lieutenant in the 36th regiment Bengal Native Infantry and doing duty with the Guide Cavalry he was present at the siege of Delhi and was wounded at Narnoul on the 14th Novr. and died on the 30th Novr. 1857. Aged 24. this monument is erected by his brother.”

Lieutenant Octavius Greene – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
2nd-in-command of 9th Oude Irregular Force. Served in Sutlej and Punjab Campaigns.

37th Bengal Native Infantry

Ensign Henry Chapman – wounded by mutineers at Benares – 4th June 1857. died of wounds

Ensign Maurice Tweedie – wounded by mutineers at Benares – 4th June 1857. died of wounds

38th Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant-Colonel Philip Goldney – murdered by mutineers at Fyzabad – 9th June 1857
Aged 55. Son of Thomas and Charlotte, of London. Husband of Mary Holbrow.

Major George Edward Hollings – wounded by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857. died of wounds.
Aged 47. Son of William Hollings, he was born in Calcutta. Joined the Bengal Army in 1826. Husband of Harriet Boscawen. Memorial at Kasauli – “George Hollings Bt Major who died at Mussoorie 8th May.” According to the date he died 2 days before his Regiment mutinied?

Major John Waterfield – murdered by mutineers near Ferozabad – 14th May 1858
Aged 45. Son of William and Elizabeth, of London. Husband of Helen Blair.

Captain Arthur Gibbings – murdered by mutineers at Fyzabad – 9th June 1857
Aged 33. Son of Rev. Thomas Gibbings, of Co. Cork. Served in Kabul (1842) and the Punjab (1848). (attached to the 15th Irregular Cavalry).
Memorial at Kasauli –
 “Arthur Gibbings Captain, murdered at Seetapore Oude on 9th June.”

Lieutenant Alexander John Anderson – killed in action at Lucknow – 10th March 1858
Aged 31. From Montrane, Fife, Scotland. Attached 2nd Punjab Infantry.

Lieutenant Charles Henry Fitzroy Gambier – wounded at Delhi, 14th September 1857. died of wounds 18th Sept. Aged 22. Eldest son of S. James Gambier, of Ashley Lodge, Cheltenham.
Grave at Delhi –
 “The grave of Lt. C.H.F. Gambier, 38th N.I. who fell mortally wounded in the ranks of the 2nd E.B. Fusiliers at the assault of Delhi and died 18th Sept 1857, aged 22.”

Ensign E. E. Beaumont – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 6th June 1857

39th Bengal Native Infantry

Captain John Sinclair – killed in action at Jhansi – 5th April 1858

Lieutenant Archibald Procter – murdered by mutineers at Moorar – 14th June 1857
Son of Revd. Thomas Proctor.
Grave at the Christian Cemetery, Gwalior – 
“Sacred to the memory of Archibald Proctor Lieut. 39th Regt. N.I. Died at Gwalior June 15th 1857 Aged 29.”

Ensign John Chalmers – killed in action at Delhi – 14th September 1857

40th Bengal Native Infantry

Major Charles Aeneas Burton – murdered by mutineers at Kotah – 15th October 1857
Political Agent. Aged 45. Son of Charles and Mary. Born in Dinapore. His 2 sons, Arthur and Francis, were murdered with him.

Captain Andrew A. Beecher – wounded at Lucknow – 26th September 1857. died of wounds 8th October. Attached to the 90th Foot. Aged 35.

Lieutenant Edward John Wild – killed in action at Lucknow – 25th September 1857

41st Bengal Native Infantry

Colonel Hugh Sibbald, CB. – murdered by mutineers at Bareilly – 31st May 1857
Aged 66. Son of William and Katherine. Husband of Mary Tichborne. Shot in the chest while riding to the parade ground by one of his orderlies.

Major Frederick William Birch – murdered by mutineers at Seetapore – 9th June 1857
Aged 43. Son of Richard (Bengal Civil Service) and Frances. Born in Bengal. Husband of Jean Walker. The Times states 3rd June.

Captain Matthew Francis Kemble – died of wounds at Lucknow

Captain William Williamson – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Aged 33. Deputy-Asst-Commissary-General. Son of the late Major-General David Williamson, Bengal Army Served in the Sutlej and Punjab Campaigns (medals & clasps). His wife, Jesse, and infant daughter, Eleanor also killed at Cawnpore.

Lieutenant John Henry Graves – wounded in head at Seetapore – died of cholera at Lucknow – 7th July 1857
Only son of Brigadier Henry Graves.

Lieutenant Robert Thornton Smalley – murdered by mutineers at Seetapore – 9th June 1857

42nd Bengal Native Infantry

Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Dalyell – killed in action at Kukrowlie – 18th September 1857
Aged 51. Son of John and Jane, of Lingo, Fife. Husband of Margaret Andrews.

43rd Bengal Native Infantry

Ensign Robert A. Smith – wounded at Mandwar – 21st January 1858. died of wounds

44th Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant John Graydon – wounded at Lucknow – 26th October 1857. died of wounds 28th October.
Son of Colonel Graydon, Royal Engineers.

Lieutenant John Smith – murdered by mutineers at Mozuffurnuggur – 21st June 1857

45th Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant-Colonel George Biddulph – killed in action at Lucknow – 18th November 1857
Aged 46. Son of Rev. John and Sophia, of Warwickshire.

46th Bengal Native Infantry

Colonel Andrew Goldie – murdered by mutineers at Fyttehghur – 15th June 1857
(Military Auditor General). Aged 64. Son of Rev. William Goldie. Husband of Mary.
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – 
“Futtehgurh Fugitives 10th N.I. Colonel G.A. Smith Wife Child.
Major R. Monro. Major J. Phillott. Lieut C.W. Swetenham. Lieut D. Henderson. Ensign R.S. Byrne. Surgeon T.C. & Mrs Heathcote. Musician W.M. Wrixen. Colonel A. Coldie Wife & Daughters. Lieut J.R. Monckton B. Engr. Wife & Child. Asst-Surgeon S. & Mrs Maltby. Contr. M Roban Ordnance Dept. & Family. School Master Sheils & Family. Sergt. Hammond Gun Agency Dept. & Family. Pensioner Faulknor.”

Captain William Louis Mosheim Bishop – murdered by mutineers at Sialkote – 9th July 1857.
Aged 39. Served in the Punjab Campaign (1848). He was Brigade Major at Sialkote when the mutiny broke out, he was killed while helping his wife escape. In The Times (2-9-57) states ‘shot by a trooper of the 9th Cavalry.’
Grave at the Cemetery near the Fort at Sialkote –
 “In memory of Captain W.L.M. Bishop 46th regt. NI. Killed in the mutiny at Sealkote on 9th July 1857 aged 39 years. Erected by his brother officers.”
A tablet in Holy Trinity Church, Sialkote –
 “To the memory of William Louis Mosheim Bishop, Captain in the 46th regiment NI who was killed by a party of native cavalry, in the mutiny at Sealkote on the 9th July 1857 also of his infant son Florance Louis, who died near Sealkote on the 7th March 1857. A token of affection from a sorrowing wife and mother.”

47th Bengal Native Infantry

Ensign Arthur James Scott – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 6th June 1857
Aged 17 years and 4 months. Second son of James Scott, of Cadogan Place, London. Killed while on temp. duty with the 6th N.I.

48th Bengal Native Infantry

Captain Henry Garden Burmester – murdered by mutineers at Lucknow – 1st June 1857

Lieutenant Gilbert Ironside Bax – killed in action at Seetapore – 3rd June 1857
Aged 24. Killed in the sortie from Cawnpore. Third son of John Bax, of Twyford House, Herts.

Lieutenant Alexander J. Dashwood – wounded at Lucknow – 6th October 1857. died of wounds

Lieutenant Charles Martin Farquharson – murdered by mutineers at Lucknow – 1st June 1857
Aged 20. Son of R.N. Farquharson, Civil Service.

52nd Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Wiggins – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Serving as Deputy-Judge Advocate General. His 2 youngest children killed with him. His wife died during the siege.
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – 
“To the glory of God and in memory of more than a thousand Christian people, who met their deaths hard by, between 6th June & 15th July 1857. These tablets are placed in this the
Memorial Church. All Souls Cawnpore by the Government N.W.P.
Staff. Major Genl. Sir H. Wheeler K.C.B. Lady Wheeler & daughters. Lieut G.R. Wheeler 1st N.I. A.D.C. Lieut Col. E. Wiggens 52nd N.I. D.J.A.G. Mrs Wiggens. Major W. Lindsay A.A.G. Mrs Lindsay & Daughters. Ensign G. and Mrs Lindsay. Brigadier General Jack C.B. Mr Jack. Capt Sir G. Parker 74th N.I. Cant. Magistr. Capt Williamson 71st N.I. D.A.C.G. Mrs Williamson & Child.”

Lieutenant Francis A.R. MacGregor – murdered by mutineers at Kutungee – 27th September 1857
Aged 33. Detained as a hostage and then murdered. Son of the late General Sir Evar M. MacGregor.

53rd Bengal Native Infantry

Major William Reade Hillersdon – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Aged 39. Son of John Hillersdon, of Barnes, Surrey. Another son, Charles (Magistrate) was also murdered.

Captain Henry Belson – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Captain John H. Reynolds – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Captain Frederic Henry Tomkinson – murdered by mutineers at Amaen – June/July (November?) 1857
Escaped to Amaen, where he was betrayed and shot. Son of Capt. Tomkinson (RN) and Frances.
Memorial at All Saints Church, Leamington Spa, Warwickshire –
 “James Tomkinson Esq. Post Captain in the Royal Navy, eldest son of John Tomkinson, of Knightly Hall in the county of Staffordshire, who died at Leamington 18 January 1839 and is buried in the adjoining cemetery. In memory of his only sons, Hill James Tomkinson, Captain Royal Artillery who died at Fishguard Pembrokeshire on 27 July 1858 aged 28 years and is buried at Manor Owen in that county and Frederic Henry Tomkinson, Captain 53rd Regt BNI aged 25 years, who, serving with his regiment in India during the rebellion of 1857, was killed in November of that year by the mutineers of the Gwalior Contingent at Amaen in Oude, in a gallant attempt, alone and unarmed, to explode the enemy’s ammunition.”

Lieutenant (Adjutant) Herbert H. Armstrong – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Aged 27. Son of Archibald Armstrong, of Guernsey.

Lieutenant Oliver Simpson Bridges – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Aged 22. Son of John William Bridges, of 30 Tavistock Square, London.

Lieutenant Frederick G. Jellicoe – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Lieutenant Gilbert Augustus Master – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Aged 25. Son of Lt-Col. R.A. Master, 7th Light Cavalry.

Lieutenant William George Prole – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Ensign Alexander Dowson – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Ensign Thomas W. Forman – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

54th Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant-Colonel John Peter Ripley – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857
Aged 55. Born in Essex. Son of Rev. Thomas and Mary. Joined the Bengal Army in 1819. Husband of Amelia Wilson.

Major Muirson Trower Blake – murdered by mutineers at Moorar – 14th June 1857
Serving with the Gwalior Contingent. Aged 47. Born in Berkhampore. Son of William. Husband of Charlotte Ricketts.

Captain Cosby Burrowes – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857
Aged 31. Son of Liuet. Cosby Burrowes of the 45th Bengal N.I. Born at Dinapore. Served in the Sutlej Campaign. Killed ‘while gallantly defending his Colonel in a skirmish with the mutineers’ (ref. The Times 19-8-57)

Captain Claude William Russell – killed in action at Badli-ke-Serai – 8th June 1857
Aged 36. Joined the Bengal Army in 1840. Son of Charles Du Pre Russell (fomerly Bengal Civil Service)
Grave at Rajpura Cemetery, Delhi –
 “Sacred to the memory of Captain C.W. Russell 54th BNI killed in action at Badlee ka Sarai 8th June 1857.”

Captain Rowland Mainwaring Smith – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857
Aged 32. Son of Charles Smith, of Northampton.
Buried on the Ridge –
 “Sacred to the memory of Captain R.M. Smith, Captain C. Burrowes, Lieut. E.A. Edwards, Lieut. W. Waterfield. All of the 54th Regt. BNI. They were killed by the mutineers of the 3rd Bengal Light Cavalry on the 11th May 1857 opposite the church in the city of Delhi, this tribute to their memory and merits is erected by their surviving brother officers.”

Captain William Waterfield – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857
Aged 21. Joined the Bengal Army in 1853.

Lieutenant Charles John Butler – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857
Ref. The Times 25-8-57: wounded in the head by a stone from a house top and a musket ball in the face, killed on the road to Meerut. Eldest son of Charles Butler, of Stock, Essex.

Lieutenant Ernest Andrew Edwards – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857
Aged 29. Son of R.V. Edwards, of Clifton. Husband of Elizabeth Leigh.
Grave on the Ridge, Delhi –
 “This tablet is sacred to the memory of departed worth to Lieut. E.A. Edwards 54th regt. BNI eldest son of R.V. Edwards Esqr. of Clifton, Bristol, who with five of his brother officers fell at the head of his regt. in the massacre of Delhi on the 11th May 1857, aged 27 years. As a soldier, ever ready, where Duty called him a dutiful son and kind and indulgent father but most conspicuous in the endearing character of husband, his fond care and affection with the memory of his many sterling qualities will ever be sacredly cherished by her who must mourn his sad and untimely end. This tomb is erected by his bereaved and sorrowing widow, as a trifling mark of love and respect to the memory of a truly kind and most affectionate husband.”

Ensign Alfred Mansell Angelo – murdered by mutineers between Delhi and Meerut – 11th May 1857
Ref. The Times 28-8-57: murdered 13th or 14th of May by villagers after escaping from Delhi. Aged 20. Second son of Colonel Richard Angelo, 34th BNI, formerly Commandant of the Delhi Palace Guard.

Ensign Charles Edward Wheatley – killed in action by a canon ball at Delhi – 17th June 1857
Aged 19. Joined the Bengal Army in 1854.
Grave at Rajpura Cemetery, Delhi –
 “Sacred to the memory of Ensign C.E. Wheatley, 54th BNI killed before Delhi 17th June 1857.”

55th Bengal Native Infantry

Captain George Gordon McBarnett – killed in action at Delhi – 14th September 1857
(attached to the 1st Bengal European Fusiliers). Aged 34. Son of Capt. Donald McBarnett, of Ballichroan, Inverness-shire. Joined the Bengal Army in 1840.
Grave in Sadar Bazar, Dehi –
 “Here repose the following officer, non commissioned officers and men of the 1st Bengal Fusiliers killed in the attack on the enemys fortified position at Kissen-gunge on the morning of the successful assault and storm of Delhi. Captain G.G. McBarnett, 55th NI (attached)..”
Memorial at the old church, Kingussie, St. Columba’s – “Sacred to the memory of Captain George Gordon McBarnet, 55th Regiment Bengal Native Infantry, who being attached to the 1st Bengal European Regiment Fusiliers, fell at the assault of Delhi on the 14th September 1857, aged 33 years. Few among the many heroes slain on the soil of Delhi will live longer in memory; young, gallant, and gifted with the noblest qualities, mental and personal, he fell when he could least be spared. Could soldier ask a more glorious death? In token of the love they bore their comrade this tablet is erected by his Brother-Officers.”

56th Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant-Colonel Stephen Williams – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Aged 52. Son of Henry Williams (Bengal Civil Service). Husband of Mary Blanchard (she was murdered in the massacre at Cawnpore).

Major Walter Roger Prout – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Aged 36. His wife, Lucy, was also killed.

Captain John Weston Delmain – killed in action at Badli-ke-Serai – 8th June 1857
Aged 29. Son of Colonel John Delmain, CB. of the Bengal Infantry. Born at Agra. Served in the Punjab (1848). Ref. The Times (11-9-57) kille ‘while leading a party of the 75th at the taking of the 24-pdr battery on the day of his arrival at Delhi.
Grave at Delhi –
 “Captain Delamain HEICS killed in action June 8, 1857.”

Captain William L. Halliday – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Captain George Kempland – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Lieutenant Quintin Henry Battye – killed in action at Delhi – 10th June 1857.
(attached to the Guides Cavalry). Aged 25. Born at Kishnagarh, Bengal. Son of George Battye. Served in Burma Campaign (1853).
Grave at Rajpura Cemetery, Delhi –
 “Sacred to the memory of Quintin Battye, Lieutenant in the late 55th Regiment Bengal Native Infantry and 2nd in command of the Corps of Guides who fell whilst nobly performing his duty against the mutineers before Delhi on the 9th June 1857. this tomb is erected by his brother officers in the Guides as a slight token of their respect and esteem for his many soldierlike and amiable qualities.”

Lieutenant William A. Chalmers – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Lieutenant Hornby Fagan – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Lieutenant Charles R. Goad – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Lieutenant W. H. J. Gregory – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Lieutenant William Gordon Morris – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Aged 23. Son of Lt-Commander George Morris, RN.

Lieutenant Henry John Gregory Warde – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Aged 19. Son of Rear-Admiral Warde, KH, of Neath, Glamorganshire.

Ensign Robert Browne – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Ref. The Times: died of cholera at Cawnpore, 22nd August. Aged 26. Son of Robert Brown, of Portland Square, formerly of Calcutta.

Ensign John Wright Henderson – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
on of Revd. Robert Henderson, of Stirling. His brother, Robert was killed with the 72nd B.N.I.

Ensign Robert Allen Stevens – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Second son of Revd. Henry Stevens, of Wateringbury, Kent.

Assistant Surgeon John Pierce Bowling – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Youngest son of John Bowling, of Pingsworth House, Hammersmith.

57th Bengal Native Infantry

Ensign Edmund Clough – murdered by mutineers at Meerut – 10th May 1857

58th Bengal Native Infantry

Captain Lionel Gomez Da Costa – died of wounds at Lucknow – 14th March 1858
Aged 34. Wounded and died same day. 2nd-in-command of the Ferozepore Regt.

59th Bengal Native Infantry

Major James Garner Holmes – murdered by mutineers at Segowlie – 23rd July 1857
(attached to the 12th Irregular Cavalry). Son of Revd. D. Holmes. His wife, Alexandrina (daughter of Major-General Sir Robert Sale) was also killed.

Lieutenant Frederick W. Birch – killed in action at Lucknow – 2nd September 1857

61st Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant Edward Thomas Kemp – died of wounds – 16th January 1859
Aged 23. Wounded at Sassia Ghat, 15th January 1859 and died next day in camp at Mela Ghat. See memorial below.

Lieutenant John Powys – murdered by mutineers at Jhansi – 6th May 1857
Aged 29. Son of Captain Robert Powys, 12th Bengal N.I. Born in Nasirabad. Joined the Bengal Army in 1846. Husband of Caroline Holmes. (she died with their 8 month old daughter in the massacre at Jhansi).
Memorial in St. Luke’s Church, Jullundur –
 “To the memory of Lieutenants John Powys, Edward Kemp, and Ensign Herbert Durnford, of the 61st Regiment N.I. who fell in action whilst serving in the earnest performance of their duty, during the rebellion of 1857-59. This token of esteem and sorrow is placed here by their comrades, the officers of the late 61st regiment N.I.”

Ensign Herbert Durnford – wounded at Jullundur, 7th June. died at Loodianah – 8th August 1857
Son of J.C. Durnford, of Kensington, London.
Aged 19. Grave at Ludhiana Cemetery –
 “To the memory of Herbert Durnford Esqr. 61st Bengal Native Infantry who died at Loodianah on the 8th August 1857 from the effects of wounds received at Jullundur on the 7th of June in defending the bell of arms of his company from the mutineers.”

62nd Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant George Septimus Bradford – died at Allahabad – 18th September 1858
Memorial at St. Peter & Paul Church, Tonbridge, Kent – “Sacred to the memory of George Septimus Bradford, Lieut. 62nd Bengal Infantry, youngest son of Major-General Bradford, C.B. Born 27th August 1832. Died 18th September 1858 at Allahabad during the Mutiny in India.”

Captain Robert B.P. Byng – killed in action at Lucknow – 18th December 1857
Brother of Viscount Torrington.

Captain Fletcher F.C. Hayes – murdered by mutineers near Bhowgong – 1st June 1857
Aged 39. Murdered by men of 2nd Regt Oude Irregular Cavalry, whom he had taken command of a few days earlier. He was serving as Military Secretary and Political Assistant to Chief Commissioner in Oude.

Ensign Charles Way – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 7th June 1857

63rd Bengal Native Infantry

Ensign Robert Loveday Inglis – wounded at Lucknow – died of fever caused by wounds – 27th December 1857. Wounded twice. Son of the late Captain Inglis, 11th Light Cavalry.

64th Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant George Snell – murdered by mutineers at Seetapore – 3rd June 1857
Aged 36. Son of Rev. Thomas Snell, of Surrey. Joined the Bengal Army in 1844. Serving with 10th Oude Irregular Infantry. Husband of Helen Davies, of Cheltenham. (she died with their 2 year old daughter in the massacre.)
Tablet in St. Mary Magdalene’s Church, Lahore Cantonment –
 “To the memory of Helen Johnson Snell aged 24 years, youngest daughter of the late S. Davies, MD of the HEICS who, with her husband Lieut. George Snell B.A., of the late 64th Bengal NI, aged 36 years, and their only child Georgina Helen, aged 2 years, fell a victim to the sepoy mutiny at Seetapore, in Oude, on the 3rd June 1857. this monument is erected by her brothers and sisters, to record their love and sorrow.”

65th Bengal Native Infantry

Brevet Major Francis Shirreff – murdered by mutineers at Moorar – 14th June 1857
Fourth son of David Shirreff, of Inverneshire. Commanding 4th Regt. Gwalior Contingent when killed.

Lieutenant Edward Speke – wounded at Delhi 14th September – died 18th September 1857
Attached to the 1st Bengal European Fusiliers. Aged 29. Son of William Speke, of Somerset. Joined the Bengal Army in 1850.
Memorial at St. Andrews Church, Dowlish Wake, Somerset –
 “Sacred to the memory of Lieutenant Edward Speke, of the 65th Regiment of Bengal Native Infantry, aged 29 years, third son of William Speke, Edqre of Jordans, in the parish of Ashill, who died on the 18th September 1857, from the  effects of a wound received on the 14th of the same month, when gallantly fighting in the ranks of the 1st Bengal Fusiliers, at the storming of Delhi. This tablet was erected by his brother officers of the 65th N.I. as a slight token of their esteem for one whose noble character and Christian virtues, had deservedly endeared him to them all.”

66th Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant Thomas S. Gepp – wounded at Churpoorah – 10th February 1858. died of wounds.

67th Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant Philip Hawtry Comyn Burlton – murdered by mutineers at Muttra – 30th July 1857
Shot by his men while on treasure-escort. Son of Colonel William Burlton, CB, of Portland Place, formerly Commissary-General of the Bengal Army. Another son, Capt. Francis Moira Hastings Burlton, was killed with the 2nd Cavalry ? Contingent. (ref The Times 8-9-57)

Lieutenant Joseph Cudbert Longueville Clarke – 67th Bengal Native Infantry – murdered by mutineers at Bhyram Ghaut – 13th June 1857. Aged 28. Assistant-Commissary in Oude, serving with the 3rd Oude Irregulars.
Memorial at Harrow School – 
“Sacred to the memory of Joseph C. Longueville Clarke Lieut in the 67th Bengal Native Infantry & 2nd in Command of the 3rd Oude Infantry who was murdered by the mutineers during the Indian Revolt of 1857 at the age of 28 yrs.”

Lieutenant Philip H. Jackson – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

68th Bengal Native Infantry

Memorial in St. Paul’s Cathedral, Calcutta – “In memory of Captain Alexander Skene. Bt Major Robert Campbell Barclay. Captain Fiennes Sanderson Miller. Lieut James Augustus Dorin. Lieut Augustus Hay Alexander.
Lieut William Henry Lumsden. Ensign Richard Tucker of the 68th Regt Native Infantry, who died during the mutiny of the native troops and subsequent operations from 1857 to 1859; some on the field of battle; some by the hands of their own followers; others by disease; all doing their duty. This monument has been erected by their fellow officers.”

Captain Alexander Skene – murdered by mutineers at Jhansi – 8th June 1857
Serving as Superintendent of Jhansi and Jaloun. Fourth son of the late Charles Skene, of Aberdeen. His wife Beatrice and 2 infant daughters, Mary and Beatrice, were killed at the same time.

Lieutenant Augustus Hay Alexander – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 7th June 1857
Aged 30. Son of Lt-Col. Alexander, 5th Bengal Light Cavalry.

Lieutenant William Henry Lumsden – killed in action at Nujuffghur – 25th August 1857
Attached 1st Punjab Inf. Aged 26. Son of Colonel Thomas Lumsden, CB, (Bengal Artillery). Born at Muttra. Joined the Bengal Army in 1849. Served with the 1st Punjab Infantry.

Ensign Richard G. Tucker – murdered by mutineers at Bareilly – 31st May 1857

71st Bengal Native Infantry

Captain Wellwood George Maclean – killed in action at Chinut – 30th June 1857

Lieutenant Aldourie P. Grant – murdered by mutineers at Lucknow – 30th May 1857

72nd Bengal Native Infantry

Lieutenant Robert C. O’Dowda – murdered by mutineers at Augur – 4th July 1857
Attached to the Scindia Contingent.

Ensign Robert William Henderson – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Son of Revd. Robert Henderson, of Stirling. His brother, John was killed with the 56th B.N.I.

73rd Bengal Native Infantry

Ensign P. S. Codd – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 7th June 1857
Aged 18. Only son of Capt. J.M. Codd, 3rd Light Dragoons.

74th Bengal Native Infantry

Major Sir George Parker – died at Cawnpore – July 1857
Aged 44. Son of Captain Sir William Parker, Royal Navy. Joined the Bengal Army in 1831. Husband of Gertrude Elderton. Tablet in St. James’ Church, Delhi – “Sacred to the memory of the undermentioned officers of the 74th Regiment N.I. who fell victims to the mutiny in 1857. Bt Major Sir G. Parker Bart. Killed in Sir H. Wheeler’s Entrenchment Cawnpore.”
Memorial at Meerut –
 “Sacred to the memory of Sir George Parker Bart. Captain, 74th Native Infantry, who died of sun stroke in the trenches at Cawnpore in the month of July 1857.”
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – 
“To the glory of God and in memory of more than a thousand Christian people, who met their deaths hard by, between 6th June & 15th July 1857. These tablets are placed in this the
Memorial Church. All Souls Cawnpore by the Government N.W.P.
Staff. Major Genl. Sir H. Wheeler K.C.B. Lady Wheeler & daughters. Lieut G.R. Wheeler 1st N.I. A.D.C. Lieut Col. E. Wiggens 52nd N.I. D.J.A.G. Mrs Wiggens. Major W. Lindsay A.A.G. Mrs Lindsay & Daughters. Ensign G. and Mrs Lindsay. Brigadier General Jack C.B. Mr Jack. Capt Sir G. Parker 74th N.I. Cant. Magistr. Capt Williamson 71st N.I. D.A.C.G. Mrs Williamson & Child.”

Captain Francis Jacques Burgess – murdered by mutineers at Jhansi – 8th June 1857.
Tablet in St. James’ Church, Delhi –
 “Captain F.J. Burgess. Killed at Jhansi 8th June 1857.”

Captain Charles Gordon – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857.
Aged 40. Served in Scutari during the Crimean War. Killed at the Cashmere Gate.
Tablet in St. James’ Church, Delhi –
 “Captain C. Gordon. Killed at the Cashmere Gate Delhi 11th May 1857.”
Tablet in St. James’ Church, Delhi –
 “To the beloved memory of Captain Charles Gordon, of the 74th Bengal Native Infantry, who fell at the Cashmere Gate of Delhi, in the mutiny there, of 11th May 1857, aged 41 after 22 years service in the Indian army.”

Lieutenant H. R. Addington – murdered by mutineers while escaping from Delhi – 11th May 1857
Tablet in St. James’ Church, Delhi –
 “The Hon’ble H.R. Addington Killed at Delhi 11th May 1857.”

Lieutenant Henry Frith Hyslop – murdered by mutineers while escaping from Delhi – 13th May 1857
Aged 27. Son of Lieutenant-Colonel Archibald Hyslop (Madras Artillery). Joined the Bengal Army in 1849.
Tablet in St. James’ Church, Delhi – “Lieutenant H.F. Hyslop. Murdered near the Hindun while escaping from Delhi.”

Lieutenant George Henry Monck Mason – murdered by mutineers at Awah – 8th June 1857
Aged 33. Son of Captain Thomas Mason, Royal Navy, and Mary, of Co. Wicklow. Joined the Bengal Army in 1842. Killed by mutineers of the Jodhpur Legion.
Tablet in St. James’ Church, Delhi –
 “Captain G.H. Monck Mason. Political Agent Joudpore. Killed in Rajpootana.”

Lieutenant Matthew Hugh Reveley – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857
Aged 27. Son of Algernon (Bengal Civil Service). Born in France. Joined the Bengal Army in 1847.
Tablet in St. James’ Church, Delhi –
 “Lieutenant M.H. Reveley. Killed at the Cashmere Gate Delhi 11th May 1857.”

Lieutenant James Digby Smith – murdered by mutineers at Delhi – 11th May 1857
Aged 26. Son of John Smith, late a Calcutta merchant, of Lindenown Station, Gipp’s Land, Victoria. Born in Calcutta. Joined the Bengal Army in 1847.
Tablet in St. James’ Church, Delhi –
 “Lieutenant J.D. Smith. Killed at the Cashmere Gate Delhi 11th May 1857.”

Ensign Thomas Lane Bayliff – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 6th June 1857
Youngest son of Revd. Thomas T.L. Bayliff, vicar of Albury, Herts.

Ensign A. M. H. Cheek – wounded at Allahabad – 6th June 1857. died of wounds 17th June 1857

Ensign Edward Morris Smith – murdered by mutineers at Allahabad – 6th June 1857
Aged 18. Fifth son of Noel Thomas Smith, of Spiddall, Galway.

June 28, 2022

Indian Mutiny Casualties List (Bengal Light Cavalry)

Filed under: Lucknowledge — admins @ 9:22 am

Indian Mutiny 1857 – 9

1st Bengal Light Cavalry

Major Alfred Harris – murdered by mutineers at Mhow – 1st July 1857.
Aged 42. A ward of the Earl of Essex. Husband of Elizabeth Darling. Joined the Bengal Army in 1832.

2nd Bengal Light Cavalry
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – “To the glory of God and in memory of more than a thousand Christian people, who met their deaths hard by, between 6th June & 15th July 1857. These tablets are placed in this the
Memorial Church. All Souls Cawnpore by the Government N.W.P.
2nd Light Cavalry – Major E. Vibart. Capt E.J. Seppings, Wife and Children. Capt R.U. & Mrs Jenkins. Lieut R.O. Quin. Lieut C.W. Quin. Lieut J.H. Harrison. Lieut W.J. Manderson. Lieut F.S.M Wren. Lieut M.G. Daniell. Lieut M. Balfour. Cornet W.A. Stirling. Surgn. W.R. & Mrs Boyes. Vety. Surgn. E.G. Chalwin & Wife. Ridg. Mr. D. Walsh, Wife & Children. Sergt. Major H. Cladwell. Qr. Mr. Sergt. F. & Mrs Tress. Cornet C. Mainwaring 6th L.C. Lieut A.J. Boulton, 7th L.C.”

Major Edward Vibart – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857?
Aged 49. Son of James Vibart, of Taunton. Husband of Emily Coles, (she was murdered in the massacre at Cawnpore along with 4 of their children).
Grave at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – 
“In three graves within this enclosure lie the remains of Major Edward Vibart, 2nd Bengal Light Cavalry, and about seventy officers and soldiers who, after escaping from the massacre at Cawnpore on the 27th June 1857 were captured by the rebels at Sheorajpoor, and murdered on the 1st July.  These remains were originally interred within the compound of Sivada House and were removed to this place in April 1861.”

Captain Robert Urqhart Jenkins – died of wounds at Cawnpore – 29th June 1857
Son of R.C. Jenkins, of Beachley, Gloucestershire.

Captain Edward James Seppings – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
His wife, Jessie, and their 3 infant sons were also murdered.

Lieutenant Melville Balfour – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Lieutenant Murray George Daniell – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Aged 39. Third son of Capt. E.M. Daniell, HEICS, of Gloucester Square, Hyde Park, London.

Lieutenant John Hammond Harrison – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Lieutenant William J. Manderson – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Lieutenant Charles William Quinn – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

Lieutenant Richard Owen Quinn – died at Cawnpore – June 1857
Aged 28. Son of Captain Thomas Quinn (4th Light Cavalry) who died 7th Nov. 1857. Born at Meerut. Joined the Bengal Army in 1846.
Memorial on his father’s grave at Simla –
 “Also of his elder son Richard Owen Quin Lieutenant in the 2nd Bengal Cavalry who died of fever in the Entrenched Camp at Cawnpore June 1857 aged 28 years and 3 months. This tablet erected by the widow and mother of the above.”

Lieutenant Francis Stoneham Montagu Wren – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Memorial at Northam church, Devon – “To the memory of Delitia Montagu wife of Major Wren of Lenwood youngest daughter of Admiral Barton Of Burrough, Died 17th June 1836 Aged 42. Also of Henry Conway son of the above Died 12th Aug 1838 Aged 15. Also of Francis Stoneham Montagu, their youngest son Lieut. in the 2nd Regt Bengal Cavalry who fell at Cawnpore during the Indian Mutiny in June 1857 Aged 21.”

Veterinary Surgeon Edmund George Chalwin – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawpore – “Sacred to the memory of E.G. Chalwin 2nd Light Cavaly and his wife Louisa who both perished during the seige of Cawnpore in July 1857.”

Riding Master David Walsh – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857

3rd Bengal Light Cavalry

Captain Charles Ayshford Sanford – killed in action at Lucknow – 10th March 1858
Aged 28. Son of Edward Ayshford Sanford, of Ninehead Court, Somerset.

Lieutenant John Campbell Erskine McNabb – murdered by mutineers at Meerut – 10th May 1857
Aged 19. Fourth son of J.M. McNabb (fomerly Bengal Civil Service).

Veterinary-Surgeon Charles John Dawson – murdered by mutineers at Meerut – 10th May 1857
Grave at Meerut –
 “This tablet was erected by Colonel G. Carmichael Smyth, 3rd Bengal Cavalry, to the memory of his friend Charles John Dawson, Veterinary Surgeon, Bengal Cavalry, and Eliza, his wife, both murdered at Meerut on 10th May 1857.”

Veterinary-Surgeon John Phillips – murdered by mutineers at Meerut – 10th May 1857
Fourth son of the late Capt. Joseph Phillips, 12th Lancers.
Grave at Meerut –
 “Sacred to the memory of John Phillips Veterinary-Surgeon 3rd Bengal Cavalry, murdered during the Mutiny on 10th May 1857. This tomb is erected by George Carmichael Smyth Colonel of the Regiment, in token of affection and regard.”

4th Bengal Light Cavalry

Lieutenant Charles John Hunt – killed in action at Mehidpore – 8th November 1857

5th Bengal Light Cavalry

Lieutenant Frederick Campbell Gostling – killed in action at Nuggeenah – 21st April 1858
Aged 25. Son of W.F. Gostling, of Palace Gardens, London. Serving with the Multanee Horse.

6th Bengal Light Cavalry

Cornet Charles Mainwaring – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – “To the glory of God and in memory of more than a thousand Christian people, who met their deaths hard by, between 6th June & 15th July 1857. These tablets are placed in this the
Memorial Church. All Souls Cawnpore by the Government N.W.P.
2nd Light Cavalry – Major E. Vibart. Capt E.J. Seppings, Wife and Children. Capt R.U. & Mrs Jenkins. Lieut R.O. Quin. Lieut C.W. Quin. Lieut J.H. Harrison. Lieut W.J. Manderson. Lieut F.S.M Wren. Lieut M.G. Daniell. Lieut M. Balfour. Cornet W.A. Stirling. Surgn. W.R. & Mrs Boyes. Vety. Surgn. E.G. Chalwin & Wife. Ridg. Mr. D. Walsh, Wife & Children. Sergt. Major H. Cladwell. Qr. Mr. Sergt. F. & Mrs Tress. Cornet C. Mainwaring 6th L.C. Lieut A.J. Boulton, 7th L.C.”

Captain Francis Gore Willock – killed at Delhi – 21st August 1857.
Aged 28. Eldest son of Sir Henry Willock. Volunteered for service at Delhi; was attached to the Corps of Guides.
Grave at Rajpura Cemetery, Delhi –
 “Sacred to the memory of Captain Francis Gore Willock 6th Bengal Light Cavalry eldest son of Sir Henry Williock, KLS who fell a gallant volunteer at Delhi on the 21st August 1857 in the 29th year of his age.”

7th Bengal Light Cavalry

Captain Charles Wilbraham Radcliffe – wounded at Lucknow – 1st October 1857. died of wounds
Aged 36. Son of Revd. Edmund S. Radcliffe, of Walton-le-Dale, Lancashire.

Captain Charles James Salmond – killed in action near Cawnpore – 6th December 1857
Memorial at St. Andrews Church, Dacre, Cumbria – “Sacred to the memory of Charles James Salmond, Captain 7th Bengal Cavalry, eldest son of James and Emma Isabella Salmond, of Waterfoot in this parish. Born at Nottingham 11th November 1833 of conspicuous gallantry and incessantly engaged during the Indian Mutiny of 1857, present at the Battles of Agra and Cawnpore and at the relief of Lucknow under Sir Colin Campbell, by whom he was on that occasion he was honourably mentioned. Five times previously wounded he fell at Cawnpore while acting as Aide de Camp to Sir James Hope Grant KCB on the night of the victory of the 6th December 1857. His sorrowing parents erect this memorial to their beloved gallant and affectionate son.”

Captain James Stevens Shepherd – killed in action at Lucknow – 26th July 1857
Aged 24. Killed in a sortie from Lucknow. Son of John Shepherd.

Captain John Staples – murdered by mutineers at Lucknow – 10th June 1857

Lieutenant Leonard Augustus Arthur – killed in action at Lucknow – 19th July 1857
Son of the late Lieut-General Sir George Arthur, formerly Governor of Bombay.

Lieutenant Augustus Boulton – murdered by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – “To the glory of God and in memory of more than a thousand Christian people, who met their deaths hard by, between 6th June & 15th July 1857. These tablets are placed in this the
Memorial Church. All Souls Cawnpore by the Government N.W.P.
2nd Light Cavalry – Major E. Vibart. Capt E.J. Seppings, Wife and Children. Capt R.U. & Mrs Jenkins. Lieut R.O. Quin. Lieut C.W. Quin. Lieut J.H. Harrison. Lieut W.J. Manderson. Lieut F.S.M Wren. Lieut M.G. Daniell. Lieut M. Balfour. Cornet W.A. Stirling. Surgn. W.R. & Mrs Boyes. Vety. Surgn. E.G. Chalwin & Wife. Ridg. Mr. D. Walsh, Wife & Children. Sergt. Major H. Cladwell. Qr. Mr. Sergt. F. & Mrs Tress. Cornet C. Mainwaring 6th L.C. Lieut A.J. Boulton, 7th L.C.”

Lieutenant Norman Alexander Martin – murdered by mutineers at Lucknow – 10th June 1857
Aged 19. Son of J.R. Martin, of Grosvenor Street, London.

Cornet W.F.K. Raleigh – murdered by mutineers at Lucknow – 30th May 1857

Veterinary-Surgeon Forbes A. Hely – wounded at Lucknow – died of wounds

Riding Master James Eldridge – murdered by mutineers at Lucknow – 15th June 1857

8th Bengal Light Cavalry

Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Tudor Tucker – murdered by mutineers at Futtehgur – 8th July 1857
Aged 40. Son of Thomas (Rear Admiral, Royal Navy) and Anne Tucker, of Tenby. Husband of Louisa (she was murdered with her 4 children in the massacre at Cawnpore).

10th Bengal Light Cavalry

Veterinary Surgeon Vincent Nelson – murdered by mutineers at Ferozepore – 19th August 1857
Aged 43. Born in London. Joined the Bengal Army in 1851.
Grave at Ferozepore –
 “Sacred to the memory of Vincent Nelson Esq. Vetry Surgn late 10th B.L. Cavalry killed at the mutiny of that Regiment August 19th 1857. Erected by his brother.”

June 22, 2022

Car Inclusions

Filed under: Uncategorized — admins @ 11:32 am

Standard Inclusions in our cars are thoughtfully planned and come in without any extra or add-on costs.

tornos-car-driver-uniform

Our car-managers’ (drivers) are in full uniform as a part of our standard service policy (White bandhgala coat with brass buttons, black peaked-cap, black trousers, black leather shoes and white gloves.

 

(IMP: Peaked cap has been temporarily removed from the uniform due to COVID protocols, as washing caps each time is practically not possible due to its construction material) 

Goodies Basket (chips, biscuits, chocolates, moong dal, cake, candies), ORS (oral re-hydration solution) in summers, with daily replenishment is a part of standard inclusion in all cars and forms a part of our standard service policy. While additionally, aerated drinks, juices and fresh uncut fruits are placed for outstation trips. Additionally watch this video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBfa-HX9Hz0

 

(IMP: Presently all Goodies Basket are packed in a cling film due to COVID protocols and this may interfere with our Responsible Tourism – Environmental Commitment protocols but is unavoidable for the time being) 

goodies-basket
bottled-water-in-ice-box Unlimited supply of bottled water (250ml / 500 ml in bottle cooler ice-box). While additionally, aerated drinks, juices and fresh uncut fruits are placed for outstation trips. Additionally watch this video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBfa-HX9Hz0
Umbrellas for sun and rain in all our cars and as many as number of guests.  umbrella-in-cars
hand-care-products Hand Sanitizer, Hand Moisturizer, Wet & Dry Tissue  
Disposable Face Mask & Gloves sealed in paper bags and Waste Disposal bags tucked in front seat pockets.  mask-and-waste-disposal-bag
covid-safety-instructions

Our transport complies with ‘COVID-19 Safeguard Standards’ as part of Stage-2 of cleanliness & hygiene standards.- Please refer  https://www.tornosindia.com/tornos-covid-19-sanitisation-guidelines/

Tornos is committed to Safe Travel and certified by WTTC for the same bearing ‘Safe Travel Stamp’

Tornos uses certified First-Aid Kits. Please watch this video to understand the concept : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBfa-HX9Hz0 tornos-certified-first-aid-box
list-of-standard-inclusions-in-first-aid-box

List of inclusions in Certified First-Aid Box. Our First-Aid Box also includes sanitary pads for a lady guests. Understand our First Aid Kit : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBfa-HX9Hz0

 

Tornos - Safe Travel Stamp

 

May 28, 2022

Indian Mutiny Casualties List (Royal Artillery)

Filed under: Lucknowledge — admins @ 9:14 am

Indian Mutiny 1857 – 9

ROYAL ARTILLERY :

Captain Whaley Nicoll Hardy – killed in action at Lucknow – 18th November 1857
Son of the late Colonel Edmund Hardy, Bombay Artillery.

Captain Headly (?) – killed in action at Lucknow – 25th September 1857

Captain E.A. D’Oyly – wounded by grape shot at Sassiah, died 23rd July 1857

Lieutenant Richard Moresby – killed in action at Chandaree – 11th March 1858
2/13th Battery.

ROYAL ENGINEERS :

Captain Augustus Jonathan Clerke – killed in action at Lucknow – 17th March 1857
23 Company.

Captain Glastonbury Neville – killed in action at Barodia – 31st January 1858
21 Company.

MILITARY TRAIN :

Captain Henry Mason – killed in action at Kheri – 7th October 1858

Lieutenant William Henry Dawson – killed in action at Chowbeejpore – 20th May 1858
2nd Battalion, Military Train.

NAVAL BRIGADE :

Captain Sir William Peel, KCB. – wounded at the Martiniere, 9th March 1858. died of smallpox at Cawnpore, 27th April 1858. HMS Shannon.

Mate Henry Garvey – killed in action at Lucknow – 11th March 1858. HMS Shannon.

Acting 2nd Mate John Fowler – killed in action at Amorrah – 5th March 1858. HMS Pearl.

Midshipman Martin A. Daniel – killed in action at Lucknow – 16th November 1857. HMS Shannon.

Captain of Maintop Francis Cassidy – killed in action at Lucknow – 14th November 1857

April 28, 2022

Indian Mutiny Casualties List (Infantry Regiments)

Filed under: Lucknowledge — admins @ 9:09 am

Indian Mutiny 1857 – 9

BRITISH INFANTRY REGIMENTS :

1/5th Foot – Northumberland Fusiliers

Major James Egbert Simmons – Killed in action at Lucknow – 29th September 1857
Memorial at St. James Church, Churchill, Avon – “James Egbert T. Simmons, Major 5th Fusiiliers. Killed at Lucknow 5 Sept. 1857. Aged 41.”

Captain Arthur England Johnson – wounded at Lucknow 25th September 1857. died 5th October 1857

Captain Ferdinand William L’Estrange – wounded at Lucknow 26th September 1857. died of wounds 30th October. Aged 31. Son of T.F. L’Estrange, of Lynn, Co. Westmeath.

Lieutenant William Marcon Carter – wounded at Lucknow 29th September 1857. died 18th October 1857
From Northwold, Norfolk.

Lieutenant Edwin Fell Haig – Killed in action at Lucknow – 23rd September 1857

1/8th Foot – King’s Liverpool Regiment

Lieutenant William Hext Mountsteven – Killed in action at Delhi – 9th July 1857
Aged 19. Son of Lieut-Colonel William Mountsteven (late-79th Highlanders).
Memorial at St. Petrocs Church, Dartmouth, Devon – 
“To the glory of God and in memory of William Mountsteven Ensign 8th The King’s Regt killed in action before Delhi 9th July 1857.”

Lieutenant William Waldegrave Pogson – wounded at Delhi 14th September 1857 – leg amputated died 17th September 1857
Aged 30. Joined the army in 1846. Son of the late Colonel Pogson, of Risgram House, Suffolk.

Lieutenant F.M. Vincent (?) – Killed in action at Cawnpore – 7th December 1857

Lieutenant Robert Webb – wounded at Delhi – 14th September 1857. died 15th September 1857

1/10th Foot – Lincolnshire Regiment

Captain Henry Jones Erskine – wounded at Arrah – 30th July 1857. died of wounds

Captain Charles Dunbar – killed in action at Arrah – 30th July 1857

1/13th Foot – Somerset Light Infantry

Captain Wilson Henry Jones – killed in action at Azimghur – 6th April 1858
Aged 27. Son of Wilson Jones, of Hartsheath, Flintshire.

Captain William Robert Moorsom – killed in action at Lucknow – 11th March 1858
Aged 23. Quartermaster-General of Division. Son of Capt. Moorsom, of Rochester.

1/24th Foot – South Wales Borderers

Captain Thomas Maling Greensill – accidentally killed at Delhi – 20th July 1857
Aged 29. Son of John and Eliza, of Co. Waterford.

Captain Francis Spring – killed in action at Jhelum – 7th July 1857
Aged 36. Son of Lieut-Colonel William Spring (57th Foot). Joined the army in 1840. Husband of Sara Day.
Buried at Jhelum Cemetery – 
“Sacred to the memory of Capt. Francis Spring H.M.’s 24th Regt. who died of a wound recd. in action at Jhelum against the mutineers of the 14th N.I. on the 7th July 1857 in the 36th year of his age. Deeply and sincerely regretted by his afflicted widow, brother officers and others who knew him.”

32nd Foot – Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry

Memorial in All Souls Church, Cawnpore – “In memory of the following Officers of the Thirty-second Cornwall Regiment Light Infantry who with Four Hundred and Forty Eight Non Commissioned Officers and Private Soldiers were killed or died in the discharge of their duty during the …. of Lucknow and Cawnpore, and the subsequent Campaign against the Mutineers in the year of our lord 1857. Colonel C.A.F.H. Berkeley, C.B.  Lieut Colonel W. Case. Captains, C. Stevens, J. Moore, J.W. Mansfield, W. Power, B.M. Cabe, Lieuts. E. de L. Joly, J.D. Thomson, F. Wainwright, P.C. Webb, J. Brackenbury, E.C. Hill, W.H. Studdy J.W. Charlton. Also in memory of Mrs Moore, Mrs Wainwright, Miss Wainwright, Mrs Hill, 43 Soldiers Wives and 55 Children of the same Regiment Murdered at Cawnpore in June of the same fatal year. The monument is erected by friends and comrades in token of affection and sorrow.”

Memorial at the Residency, Lucknow – “To commemorate the gallant part taken by H.M. 32nd Foot in the herioc defence of The Residency in 1857 also to the memory of the Officers, Non-commissioned officers, men, women and children of the Regiment who perished here and at Cawnpore.”

Major William Case – killed in action at Chinut – 30th June 1857

Captain Edmond De le Jolly – wounded 26th September 1857. died 29th September 1857

Captain Bernard McCabe – wounded 26th September 1857. died 1st October 1857

Captain James Mansfield – wounded 13th September 1857. died same day.

Captain John Moore – murdered in the Cawnpore Massacre – 27th June 1857

Captain William Power – died of wounds 10th August 1857
Only son of George Power, of Cheltenham.

Captain Charles Steevens – killed in action at Chinut – 30th June 1857
Aged 39. Brother of Lieutenant-Colonel George Steevens, 20th Foot.
Memorial in St. Mary’s Church, Cheltenham – 
“Also of Captain Charles Steevens, HM 32nd Regiment (brother of the above) who was killed in a sortie against the mutineers at Lucknow, Bengal  June 30th 1857, aged 39.”

Lieutenant Joseph Brackenbury – killed in action at Chinut – 30th June 1857
Aged 25. Son of Revd. Joseph Brackenbury, Chaplain of the Magdelen Hospital.

Lieutenant Evelyn Charles Hill – murdered in the Cawnpore Massacre – 27th June 1857
Son of George Hill, late of Calcutta.

Lieutenant William Humphrey Studdy – died of wounds – 9th August 1857
Aged 19. Son of Major J.B. Studdy, late Bengal Cavalry.

Lieutenant James Dugald Thomson – killed in action at Chinut – 30th June 1857
Son of Lt-General Alexander Thomson, CB, of Salruck, Co. Galway.

Lieutenant Frederick Wainwright – murdered in the Cawnpore Massacre – 27th June 1857

Lieutenant Pelham Caryer Webb – killed in action – 26th September 1857
Aged 26. Son of George Webb, of Leicester.

34th Foot – 1st Border Regiment

Memorial in All Souls Church, Cawnpore – “Sacred to the memory of Lieutenant Edward Jordan killed in action. Ensign Theophilus G.B. Applegate died of wounds. Ensign Lyndon J. Grier. Cr. Sergeant Charles Feddon. Sergeant Patrick Jones. Corporal James Stock. Corporal William Clarke. One drummer and Twenty Four Privates all of Her Majesty’s XXXIV or Cumberland Regiment who were killed in action or died of wounds received at Cawnpore on the 28th November 1857. This tablet is erected by the officers of the Regiment to mark their esteem and regard for their late youthful and gallant brother officers and to record the sincere sorrow expressed by all ranks at thier early deaths also as a tribute of respect and admiration to the bravery and devotion of their late Comrades, the Non Commissioned Officers Drummers and Private soldiers who fell upon the same occasion.”

Lieutenant Edward Jordan – killed in action at Cawnpore – 28th November 1857
Aged 21. Son of Revd. Gibbes Walker Jordan, of Waterstock, Oxon.

Ensign Theodore G. Applegate – wounded at Cawnpore, 28th November 1857. died of wounds

Ensign Arthur Gilley – died of accidental wounds – 18th October 1857

Ensign Lyndon John Grier – wounded at Cawnpore 28th November 1857. Died 29th November
Aged 19. Son of Revd. John W. Grier, of Amblecote, Stourbridge.

Ensign Henry Lampden – wounded at Cawnpore, 28th November 1857. died of wounds

35th Foot – 1st Royal Sussex Regiment

Captain Arthur J. Le Grand – killed in action at Judgispore – 23rd April 1858

Lieutenant William Glynne Massey – killed in action at Judgispore – 23rd April 1858

Assistant-Surgeon William George Clarke – killed in action at Judgispore – 23rd April 1858
Born 4th February 1828 at Ballymena, Co. Antrim.

37th Foot – 1st Royal Hampshire Regiment

Captain Louis Henry Bedford – killed in action at Azimghur – 15th April 1858
Aged 38.

Lieutenant George Bagenall – killed in action at Arrah – 30th July 1857

Lieutenant Edward Birkett – killed in action at Arrah – 30th July 1857
Aged 21. Son of the late Revd. James Birkett, Ovingham, Northumberland.

Ensign Edwin Stephen Sale – killed in action at Arrah – 30th July 1857
Son of John S. Sale, of Rugby.

42nd Foot – 1st Royal Highland Regiment

Captain William Lawson – died of wounds – 19th August 1858

Lieutenant Alfred Jennings Bramly – killed in action at Rooya – 15th April 1858
Aged 22. Son of Revd. Thomas Jennings Bramly, of Tunbridge Wells, Kent.

Lieutenant Charles Douglas – wounded at Rooya, 15th April 1858. died of wounds 17th April 1858

52nd Foot – 2nd Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

Lieutenant James Hill Bradshaw – killed in action at Delhi – 14th September 1857
Aged 20.

Lieutenant Thomas Robinson Gibbons – killed in action at Cawnpore – 28th November 1857
Aged 26. Served in Burma (1852).

Captain William Robert Moorsom – killed in action at Lucknow – 11th March 1858
Aged 23. Son of Captain William Moorsom (late-52nd Foot). Joined the army in 1852.
Memorial at Harrow School, Harrow – 
“In loving memory of William Robert Moorsom, Harrow School 1847-51, 52nd Light Infantry 1852-8 on Staff of the Armies Havelock & Outram during the Indian Mutiny. He was twice wounded, 12 times mentioned in despatches, thanked by the Government of India & promoted to Capt. on 5 May 1858 six days later giving his life for his Queen at the capture of Lucknow in his 24 year.”

53rd Foot – 1st King’s Shropshire Light Infantry

Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Powell, CB – killed in action at Kujwa – 1st November 1857

Lieutenant Frederick Brockhurst – shot in abdomen at Meangunge 23rd February 1858. died of wounds 13th April 1858. Aged 25. Son of Revd. J. Sumner Brockhurst, of Sandown, Isle of Wight.

1/60th Foot – 1st King’s Royal Rifle Corps

Captain Francis Andrews – killed in action at Ghazee-od-deen Nuggur – 30th May 1857
Memorial at Meerut – “Erected by the 60th Rifles in memory of Captain F. Andrews ….  who were killed near this spot in action with the mutineers of the Bengal Army on the 30th and 31st May 1857.”

Ensign William Henry Napier – wounded at Ghazee-od-deen Nuggur, 30th May 1857. died of wounds at Meerut, 4th June
Aged 21. Son of Major-General Johnstone Napier (Madras Army). Born in Paris. Joined the army in 1855.
Memorial at Meerut – “Erected by the 60th Rifles in memory of …. also of Ensign W.H. Napier, who was wounded on the 31st May and died at Meerut on the 4th June 1857.”

Ensign Everard Aloysius Lisle Phillips, VC – killed in action at Bank House, Delhi – 16th September 1857 Aged 22. Son of Ambrose Phillips, of Leicestershire. Joined the Bengal Army in 1854. Won the VC for actions during the siege of Delhi.
Buried at Rajpura Cemetery, Delhi – 
“E.A.L. Phillips Esqr. Ens. H.M. 60th Rifles killed at the siege of Delhi. 17th Sept. 1857, aged 21 yrs. R.I.P. erected by his brother officer H. Le C.M.”

61st Foot – South Gloucestershire Regiment

Lieutenant Thomas Gabett – killed in action at Nujuffghur – 25th August 1857
Aged 27. Son of John, of Co. Clare. Served in the Punjab (1848).
Memorial at Delhi – 
“Sacred to the memory of Captain W. A. Dely H.M. 61st regt. died of cholera Oct. 1st 1857 aged 47 years. Lt. T. Gabbett H.M. 61st regt. killed in action at Nujuffgurh August 26th 1857 aged 27 years Lt. G. S. Tyler H.M. 61st regt. died of cholera in camp before Delhi Sept. 5th 1857 aged 31 years Lt. S.B. Elkington H.M. 61st regt mortally wounded in action at Nujuffgurh and died Sept. 1857 aged 21 years, sincerely regretted by their brother officers by whom this tablet is erected.”

Ensign Samuel Bucknall Elkington – wounded at Nujuffghur, 25th August 1857. died 7th September 1857 Aged 20. Memorial above. Son of Dr. Elkington, of Birmingham.

64th Foot – 1st North Staffordshire Regiment

Lieutenant-Colonel Nicholas Wilson – killed in action at Cawnpore – 28th November 1857
Aged 62. Born 31 March 1795, at Sledagh, Co. Wexford, Ireland. Husband of Anne Holcombe. Served as a Brigadier General.

Major Thomas Stirling – killed in action at Cawnpore – 28th November 1857

Captain Richard Charles McCrae – killed in action at Cawnpore – 28th November 1857

Captain William Fletcher Morphy – killed in action at Cawnpore – 28th November 1857
Aged 32. Son of late Captain James Morphy, 70th Foot.

Lieutenant Rowland Bateman – killed in action at Lucknow – 25th September 1857

Lieutenant A. McKinnon – killed in action at Cawnpore – 28th November 1857

71st Foot – 1st Highland Light Infantry

Lieutenant Wyndham Neave – killed in action at Morar – 16th June 1858
Grave at the Christian Cemetery, Gwalior – “Sacred to the memory of Lieutenant Wyndham Neave 71st Highland Light Infantry who was killed in action at Moror Gwalior on 16th June 1858 Aged 23 years and 7 months. This monument is erected by his brother officers.”

75th Foot – 1st Gordon Highlanders

Captain Alexander Chancellor – wounded Delhi, 13th September 1857. Died Kasauli – 4th October 1857
Aged 30. Son of Alexander, of Lanark.
Buried at No.4 Cemetery, Kasauli – 
“Sacred to the memory of Alexander Chancellor Esqr. late Captain in Her Majesty’s 75th Regiment, fourth son of the late Alexr. Chancellor Esqr. of Shuldhill Lanarkshire. Born 29th March 1857. This brave and devoted soldier departed this life at Kussowlee on the fourth day of October 1857. He died from wounds received in action before Delhi, against the Mutineers of India on the 13th Sept. 1857, the night previous to the successful assault by the victorious British Forces. His life was exposed to danger and hardship trial and privation cheerfully endured in a good cause from the 8th June 1857 when the memorable battle of Budle-ki-serai was fought and won to the day of his death.”

Captain Edward William Knox – killed in action at Delhi – 12th June 1857
Aged 37. Son of John and Maria, of Co. Mayo. Joined the Army in 1839. Husband of Charlotte Gardiner. Ref. The Times 28-8-57: ‘before Delhi, while gallantly leading his picket to repel the assault of the rebel army on The Tower Battery, he was shot through the head.’

Captain McDonald – killed in action – 11th March 1858

Lieutenant Edward Villiers Briscoe – killed in action at Delhi – 18th September 1857
Third son of the late Capt. Henry Briscoe, RE.

Lieutenant William Crozier – killed in action at Delhi – 18th July 1857

Lieutenant George Charles Norris Faithfull – wounded at Delhi 14th July 1857. died of wounds at Ambala – 31st October 1857
Buried at Ambala Cemetery – “Sacred to the memory of Lieut. G.C.N. Faithfull H.M.s 75th Regiment. A soldier zealous and true counting his life as nothing so he but discharged his duty to his Country. He died at Umballa Oct. 31st 1857. Aged 26.”

Lieutenant John Richard Sherlock Fitzgerald – killed in action at Delhi – 14th September 1857
Aged 29.

Lieutenant Alfred Harrison – killed in action at Badli-ke-Serai – 8th June 1857
Aged 27.

78th Foot – 2nd Seaforth Highlanders

Captain Robert Bogle – wounded at Lucknow, 26th September 1857. died 19th November 1857

Captain John Fowden Haliburton – wounded at Lucknow, 4th October 1857. died 5th October 1857

Lieutenant Montagu Alexander Kirby – died of wounds – 25th September 1857

Lieutenant John Swanson – wounded at Lucknow, 25th September 1857. died 2nd October 1857
Aged 22. Son of Colonel Swanson, Bombay Army.

Lieutenant Joseph Webster – killed in action at Lucknow – 25th September 1857

81st Foot – 2nd The Loyal Regiment

Lieutenant Rothes Hastings Neville – murdered at Pak-Pulton, on the Sutlej – 5th October 1857
Aged 25. He was on his way to Bombay to be married when he was killed by mutineers.

82nd Foot – 2nd South Lancashire Regiment

Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – “Sacred to the memory of Captain John Gordon. Lieut. Arthur Platt Hensley H.M. 82nd Regt. who fell in the defence of Cawnpore in November 1857 also of Ensign William Temple Thompson H.M. 82nd Regt. who was killed at the second relief of Lucknow on the 18th November 1857. This tablet is erected by their brother officers.”

Captain John Gordon – died of wounds at Cawnpore – 8th January 1858
Aged 27. Son of Capt. Robert Gordon, late 45th Foot.
Memorial in Farnham Parish Church – 
“Capt. John Gordon 82nd Regiment wounded 28 Nov. 1857 at Cawnpore died of his wound 08 Jan. 58 born at Ashridge House, Aldershot, on 14th March 1830.”

Lieutenant Cecil J. East – killed in action at Cawnpore – 26th November 1857

Lieutenant Arthur Platt Hensley – killed in action at Cawnpore – 29th November 1857

Ensign William Temple Thompson – killed in action at Lucknow – 18th November 1857
Aged 21. Son of J. Thompson, Sherwood Hall, Notts.

83rd Foot – 1st Royal Ulster Rifles

Captain Samuel Read – killed in action at Jeerum – 23rd October 1857

84th Foot – 2nd York & Lancaster Regiment

Memorial at the Residency, Lucknow – “To the memory of Lieut. Col. C. Seymour. Capt. E. Currie. Capt. R. Pakenham. Lieut. B. Sandwith. Lieut. F. Saunders. Lieut. H. Ayton. Lieut. P. Chute. Lieut. A. Gibaut. Lieut. W. Poole. Lieut. R. Maybury. Ensign H. Kenny. Paymaster G. Eddy. Qr.Master H. Donelan of the 84th York and Lancaster Regiment who were killed, died of their wounds, or of disease during the Indian Mutiny campaign nobly performing their duty. To behold the devotion, gallantry and true discipline displayed by the above at all times and on all occasions this monument is erected by the officers of the Regt.”

Captain Eugene Currie – died of wounds at Cawnpore –
Son of Claude Currie, Physician-General, Madras. His brother, Lt. Richard Currie, Bengal Artillery also died in the Mutiny.

Captain Robert Maxwell Packenham – killed in action at Lucknow – 25th September 1857
Aged 22. Fourth son the late Lieut-General Sir Hercules Packenham. His older brother, Lt-Col. Edward, Coldstream Guards, was killed at Inkermann in the Crimean War.

Lieutenant H.A.W. Ayton – wounded at Lucknow, 16th November 1857. died of wounds 29th November 1857. Son of Surgeon Robert Ayton, late 34th Foot. Lost his arm when wounded.

Lieutenant J.J. Nunn (?) – killed in action at Lucknow – 29th September 1857

Lieutenant William Poole – wounded at Lucknow, 25th September 1857. died of wounds

Lieutenant Benjamin Sandwith – killed in action – 22nd November 1857

Lieutenant Frederick John Saunders – murdered in the Cawnpore Massacre – 27th June 1857
Aged 31. Son of Lt-Col. R. Saunders. Ref. The Times (11-11-57) ‘when brought before that miscreant the Raja Nana Sahib, he pulled out his revolver, shot dead 5 of the guard and missed the Raja with the 6th round.’

86th Foot – 2nd Royal Irish Regiment

Surgeon Thomas Stack – killed in action at Jhansi – 3rd April 1858
Born 19th September 1818. MD at Glasgow, 1843. (Obituary Fermanagh Times 28 August 1902) – “Dr. Stack of the 86th Regiment referred to above as having been killed, was the brother of the present day Bishop of Clogher. He was the surgeon of the regiment, a man of great height, powerful physique and a brave soldier.”

87th Foot – 1st Royal Irish Fusiliers

Lieutenant John Wall – killed in action at Lucknow – 14th March 1858

88th Foot – 1st Connaught Rangers

Captain Henry Hooper Day – killed in action at Cawnpore – 26th November 1857
Ref. The Times: ‘He was previously wounded in the arm, but refused to retire and continued gallantly leading his men, when he fell shot through the head.’ Son of D.J. Day, of Rochester.
Memorial at Memorial Church at Cawnpore – 
“In memory of the Undermentioned officers of the Connaught Rangers. Capt. H.H. Day, killed in action at Pandoo Nuddee, 26 Novr, 1857, aged 20 years.”

Captain John Evans – wounded at Cawnpore – 27th November 1857. died of wounds 5th October 1861
Memorial at Chagford church, Devonshire – “Dedicated to the memory of Captain John Evans late 88th Regiment Connaught Rangers, in which regiment he served in the Crimea during the war with Russia, and was present at the seige of Sebastopol attack on the quarries 7th June and Redan 18th June, 1855 and although badly wounded in the trenches 8th August, he continued with his regiment to India as adjutant, and was severely wounded in action with the mutineers of the Indian Army at Cawnople on the 27th November, 1857, from the effect of which he died at Babbicombe on the 5th October, 1861 at the early age of 23 years and was buried in the churchyard of the parish of St. Mary church in this county. This monument is erected as a tribute of affectionate regret to his memory by his maternal grand uncle E.S. Baily, Esq. of Whiddon Park, in this parish.”

Ensign Fitzgerald Massy Mitchell – wounded at Cawnpore, 26th November 1857. died of wounds 7th December 1857
Memorial at Memorial Church at Cawnpore – “In memory of the Undermentioned officers of the Connaught Rangers… Ensign F.M. Mitchell, died at Cawapore, 7 Decr, 1857, of wounds received in action at Pandoo Nuddee, 26 Novr, aged 36 yrs.”

90th Foot – 2nd Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)

Memorial at the Residency, Lucknow – “Erected by the officers of H.M. 90 Light Infantry in memory of their comrades who fell during the Indian Rebellion of 1857 & 1858 and as a tribute to their gallantry. Colonel Robert P. Campbell C.B. died of his wounds at Lucknow 12th November 1857. Major Roger Barnston died of his wounds at Cawnpore 23rd December 1857. Brevet Major James Perrin died of his wounds at Alumbagh 30th September 1857.
Captain Harry Denison died of his wounds at Lucknow 29th October 1857. Lieutenant Nicol Graham killed in action at Alumbagh 23rd Sept 1857. Lieutenant John Joshua Nunn killed in action at Alumbagh 24th Sept 1857. Lieutenant Arthur Moultrie killed in action at Lucknow 26th September 1857. Lieutenant W H L Carleton died of small pox at Lucknow 10th April 1858. Lieutenant R G Synce died of consumption at Lucknow 8th September 1858. Lieutenant N Preston died of his wounds at Alumbagh 27th September 1857. Ensign Arthur Chute died of dyssentry at Calcutta 23rd February 1858. Ensign Hugh Gordon died of coup de soleil at Lucknow 28th May 1858. Assistant Surgeon R Nelson died of fever 18th August 1857. Also to the memory of 271 non-commissioned officers and privates of the Regiment who fell in the gallant performance of their duty at the Relief the Defence and the Capture of Lucknow and during the subsequent campaign in Oudh.”

Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Parker Campbell – wounded at Lucknow, 26 August 1857. died of wounds

Major Roger Barnston, CB – wounded at Shah Najaf, 16 November 1857. died of wounds 23 December
Aged 31. Son of the late Roger Harry Barnston, of Crewe Hall, Chester.
Memorial on Chester Road, north of Farndon, Cheshire – 
“Erected in memory of Roger Barnston Esq’re of Crew Hill, Major and Brevet Lieu’t Colonel of Her Majesty’s 90th Light Infantry, CB and Knight of the Legion of Honor and of the Order of the Madjidie; By his tenants and friends. He served in the Crimean War from the 5th December 1854; and was present at the siege and fall of Sebastopol; and also in the Indian Mutiny Campaign in 1857 in which he received a severe wound whilst gallantly leading an assault at the relief of Lucknow on the 16th November 1857, from the effects of which he died at Cawnpore on the 23rd December 1857, aged 31 years, and was interred in the Military Cemetery at that station.”

Captain Harry Dension – wounded at Lucknow, 6th October 1857. right arm amputated. died 29th October 1857.

Captain James Perrin – wounded at Lucknow, 27th September 1857. died of wounds

Lieutenant Nicol Grahame – killed in action at Lucknow – 23rd September 1857
Son of Major Duncan Grahame (6th Foot) and Mary Love, from Ardrossan, Ayrshire. Letters

Lieutenant Arthur Austen Moultrie – wounded at Lucknow – 25th September 1857. died 26th September.
Son of George A. Moultrie, of Aston Hall, Shrosphire.

Lieutenant John Joshua Nunn – killed in action at Lucknow – 24th September 1857

Lieutenant Moyes Preston – wounded at Lucknow, 25th September 1857. died of wounds
Aged 20. Son of Revd. W.M.S. Preston, of Warcop Hall, Westmorland. His brother, Capt. Henry Preston, 90th Foot was killed in the Crimean War.

93rd Foot – 2nd Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders

Lieutenant-Colonel Adrian Hope – killed in action at Rooya – 15th April 1858
(with Staff) Aged 37. Son of General John Hope, Earl of Hopetoun.

Captain James Dalzell – killed in action at Secundra Bagh – 16th November 1857

Captain J. Lumsden – killed in action at Lucknow – 17th November 1857

Captain Charles William McDonald – killed in the assault on Begum’s Palace – 11th March 1858
Aged 22. Son of Lt-General Sir John McDonald, KCB, of Dalchosnie, Pertshire.

Lieutenant Charles Warden Sergison – killed in the assault on Begum’s Palace – 11th March 1858
Aged 23. Son of Revd. W. Sergison, rector of Slaugham, Sussex.

Lieutenant H.C. Sterling – died of wounds – 12th December 1857

95th Foot – 2nd Sherwood Foresters

Captain Evelyn Bazalgette – killed in action at Kotah – 1st April 1858
Aged 22. Son of Colonel Bazalgette, of Regents Park, London. Served in the Crimea, wounded carrying the Colour at the Battle of the Alma. Killed when a magazine was exploded by mutineers. Ref. The Times 26-5-58: ‘His remains were borne to the grave by his companions in arms, covered by the regimental colour with which he had son nobly distinguished himself, and which still bears the marks of his blood, shed in his country’s cause.’

Lieutenant Alexander Fawcett – killed in action at Beejapore – 5th September 1858

97th Foot – 2nd Royal West Kent Regiment

Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Onslow Winnington Ingram – killed in action at Lucknow – 14th March 1858
Aged 41. Son of the late Revd. Edward Winnington Ingram, of Ribbesford, Worcestershire and canon of Worcester Cathedral.

Lieutenant Percy Charles Smyth – died of wounds – 4th March 1858
Aged 21. Son of the late Henry Mitchell Smyth, of Castle Widenham, Cork.

2nd Bn. Rifle Brigade

Major Charles John Woodford – killed in action at Cawnpore – 28th November 1857
Aged 34, son of General Sir Alexander Woodford.
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawpore – 
“Sacred to the memory of Major C.J. Woodford 2nd Batt Rifle Brigade
killed in action before Cawnpore Nov. 28th 1857. This stone was erected to his memory by his brother officers.”

Captain William Frederick Thynne – killed in action at Lucknow – 11th March 1858

Lieutenant Henry Alexander Scriven – killed in the storming of Nonadee – 20th October 1858

Ensign Lovick Emelius Cooper – wounded at Lucknow, 11th March 1858. died at Dilkoosha 19th March 1858 Aged 20. Son of Revd. Lovick Cooper, vicar of Epingham, Rutland.

March 28, 2022

Indian Mutiny Casualties List (Cavalry Regiments)

Filed under: Lucknowledge — admins @ 9:04 am

Indian Mutiny 1857 – 9

BRITISH CAVALRY REGIMENTS :

2nd DRAGOON GUARDS
 (The Queen’s)

Major John Percy Smith – Killed in action at Nusseraspoie – 6th March 1858


6th DRAGOON GUARDS
 (Carabineers)

Captain George Wardlaw – Killed in action at Gungeree – 14th December 1857

Aged 28. Son of the late Lieut-General Wardlaw, 55th Foot.

Captain German Wheatcroft – Killed in action at Lucknow – 15th November 1857

(att. to the Military Train) Son of David Wheatcroft, of Wingfield Park, Derbyshire.
Memorial at Sedbergh School, Sedbergh, Cumbria – “To the memory of Captain German Wheatcroft of the Inniskilling Dragoons and the 6th Dragoon Guards who charged with the Heavy Brigade at Balaclava and, having offered his services during the Indian Mutiny, was killed at Lucknow on the 14th November 1857 while gallantly leading a squadron of the 9th Lancers.”

Lieutenant John Hudson – Killed in action at Gungeree – 14th December 1857
Aged 25. Son of George Hudson, M.P.

Lieutenant Sydney Vyse – Killed in action at Gungeree – 14th December 1857
Aged 23. Son of Richard Vyse, of Holly Lodge, Luton.

Assistant-Surgeon Stewart Moore – wounded at Hindun River – 31st May 1857. died 2nd June.
Aged 29. Born 11th November 1828 at Tyrone, Ireland. Served in the Crimea 1854 (medal and 3 bars) .
Grave at Meerut – “Sacred to the memory of Stewart Moore, Esq. Assistant-Surgeon H.M’s 6th Dragoon Guards (Carabineers), who died at Meerut. on the 2nd June 1857, of wounds received in action with the mutineers at Ghazi-ud-din Nagar, on the 31st May 1857, aged 26 year. This tomb was erected by his brother officers.”

7th HUSSARS (Queen’s Own)

Cornet William George Hawtrey Bankes – wounded at Musa Bagh, 19th March 1858. Right arm and leg amputated. Died 6th April 1858. Aged 21. Son of George Bankes.

8th HUSSARS (King’s Royal Irish)

Lieutenant John Reilly – Killed in action at Gwalior – 17th June 1858

9th LANCERS (The Queen’s Royal)

Captain Robert Abercromby Yule – Killed in action at Delhi – 19th June 1857.
Served Ghuzni 1839 (16th Light Dragoons – medal), Sutlej 1845 (medal and bar), 9th Lancers in 1847, Punjab 1848 (medal and 2 bars). Married Margaret Rodgers at Edinburgh, 9th November 1841.

Captain Lucius John French – Killed in action at Agra – 10th October 1857

Captain Thomas Hutchinson – wounded at Lucknow, 19th March 1858. Died 21st March.

14th LIGHT DRAGOONS (The King’s)

Lieutenant Leonard Redmayne – Killed in action at Mundisore – 23rd November 1857

February 28, 2022

Indian Mutiny Casualties List (Staff Officers)

Filed under: Lucknowledge — admins @ 9:00 am

Indian Mutiny 1857 – 9

STAFF OFFICERS

Major-General Nicholas Penny, CB – Killed in action at Kukerowlee – 30th April 1858. Aged 69. Son of Robert and Catherine Penny, of Weymouth, Dorset. Joined the Bengal Army in 1806. Husband of Louisa Gerard. Grave at Meerut – “Sacred to the memory of Major General N. Penny, CB. Commanding the Meerut Division. Born at Weymouth, Dorsetshire on the 12th March 1790, Killed at the head of his column in a skirmish with the enemy near the village of Kukerowlee, in Rolilcund, on the morning of the 30th April 1858 after a service of 51 years. His precious remains were brought to Meerut through the kind exertions of Captain E.J. Simpson Asst Commy Gen.”

Major-General Sir Hugh Wheeler – Killed by mutineers at Cawnpore – 27th June 1857
Memorial at All Souls Church, Cawnpore – “To the glory of God and in memory of more than a thousand Christian people, who met their deaths hard by, between 6th June & 15th July 1857. These tablets are placed in this the
Memorial Church. All Souls Cawnpore by the Government N.W.P.
Staff. Major Genl. Sir H. Wheeler K.C.B. Lady Wheeler & daughters. Lieut G.R. Wheeler 1st N.I. A.D.C. Lieut Col. E. Wiggens 52nd N.I. D.J.A.G. Mrs Wiggens. Major W. Lindsay A.A.G. Mrs Lindsay & Daughters. Ensign C. and Mrs Lindsay. Brigadier General Jack C.B. Mr Jack. Capt. Sir G. Parker 74th N.I. Cant. Magistr. Capt Williamson 71st N.I. D.A.C.G. Mrs Williamson & Child.”

Brigadier General Sir Henry Montgomery Lawrence, KCB. – wounded at Lucknow – 2nd July 1857. Died 4th July. Aged 51. Son of Lieutenant-Colonel Alexander Lawrence (77th Foot) and Catherine. Born in Matura, Ceylon, 28th June 1805. Joined the Bengal Artillery in 1821. Husband of Honoria Marshall.
Grave at the Residency, Lucknow – “Here lies Henry Lawrence who tried to do his duty. May the Lord have mercy on his soul. Born 28th June 1806 Died 4th July 1857.”
Tablet in Holy Trinity Church, Lawrence Military Assylum – “Sacred to the memory of Sir Henry Montgomery Lawrence, KCB. Brigadier General, Chief Commissioner in Oudh. He commanded the Garrison of Lucknow at the outbreak of the Sepoy Mutiny of 1857; was wounded by a shell on the 2nd and died on the 4th day of July 1857. Aged 52 years. This Institution which he originated, and to which he contributed 87,000 Rupees is his best monument.”
Memorial in St. Paul’s Cathedral, Calcutta – “In memory of the great and good Sir Henry Montgomery Lawrence K.C.B. Christian statesman, philanthropist and soldier who in the Punjab, Rajputana and Oudh taught how kindly subject races should be ruled who first in India, founded hill asylums for British soldiers children and who fell in the memorable defence of Lucknow 4th July 1857 beloved and mourned by natives and Europeans.”

Brigadier-General James George Smith Neil – Killed in action at Lucknow – 25th September 1857. Shot in the head at Khas Bazaar. 1st Madras Fusiliers.
Memorial at the Residency, Lucknow – “Sacred to the memory of Brigadier General J.G.S. Neill A.D.C. to the Queen. Col J.L. Stephenson c.o. Major S.G.C. Renaud Lieut. W.G. Groom. Lieut N.H. Arnold. Lieut A.A. Richardson. Lieut J.A. Chisholm Liuet F. Dobbs 352 non-commissioned officers, drummers and rank and file of the First Madras Fusiliers who fell during the supression of the rebellion in Bengal 1857-58.”

Brigadier-General John Nicholson – wounded at Delhi -14th September 1857. Died 23rd September. Aged 34. Son of Dr. Alexander Nicholson and Clara, of Dublin. Joined the Bengal Army in 1839. Served in the Punjab (1848). He was buried at the Cashmere Gate Cemetery, Delhi – “The grave of Brigadier General John Nicholson, who led the assault on Delhi; but fell in the hour of victory, mortally wounded, and died 23rd September 1857; aged 35.’

Brigadier Isaac Henley Handscombe – murdered by mutineers at Lucknow – 30th May 1857. Aged 52. Born in Buckingham. Son of Isaac and Anne Handscombe. Served in Burma War (1825), Ghuzni (1839), Kabul (1842), Sutlej War, Burma (1853). Tablet in St. Mary Magdalenes Church, Lahore Cantonment – ‘Sacred to the memory of Brigadier Isaac Handscombe, Bt. Major Robert Spencer and Sergeant Major John Potter who were barbarously murdered by the mutineers when nobly attempting to recall their men to their duty, the first fell at Lucknow on the 31st May and the two last at Meean Meer on the 30th July 1857.’

Brigadier-General Nicholas Wilson – Killed in action at Cawnpore – 28th November 1857. Aged 62. Born 31 March 1795, at Sledagh, Co. Wexford, Ireland. Husband of Anne Holcombe. Lieutenant-Colonel 64th Foot.

Colonel Charles Chester – Killed in action at Badli-ke-Serai – 8th June 1857. Aged 53. Son of Sir Robert Chester and Eliza. Born in Suffolk. Served in Burma (1825), Punjab (1848). Husband of Margaret Mundy. He was buried at Rajpura Cemetery, Delhi – ‘To the memory of Colonel Chester Adjutant General of the army, who fell mortally wounded at the battle of Badlee Suraie. This monument is erected by his brother officers of the General Staff in token of their affectionate regard and esteem. his remains were here interred on the 8th June 1857.’

Lieutenant-Colonel George Biddulph – Killed in action at Lucknow – 16th November 1857. Aged 46. Son of Rev. John and Sophia Biddulph, of Frankton, Warwickshire.

Brevet-Major W.P. Jenkins – Killed in action at Kuttunge – 14th November 1857

Captain Neville – Killed in action at Barodia – 31st January 1858

Lieutenant John Wall – Killed in action at Lucknow – 14th March 1858

February 3, 2022

Tourism Industry Sidelined in Union Budget – Prateek Hira speaks to The Pioneer

Filed under: News — admins @ 9:11 am

Uttar Pradesh Chairman of IATO and FICCI’s Tourism Committee, Prateek Hira, said the tourism industry was once again sidelined in the Union budget as no direct benefit was passed on to it, in spite of the fact that this was the most ailing of all sectors due to the pandemic.
Hira added, “The extension of ECLGS through 2023 is a welcome step and allocation of additional Rs 50,000 crore dedicated to tourism would bring in some relief for the industry.”Prateek Hira is quite upbeat about the announcements regarding multi modal transport for convenient travel, introduction of new Vande Bharat trains and detailed projects of five river systems.

In addition to that, the eight ropeways and integrated connectivity between train stations and expansion of 25,000 kilometres of highways in the country is a thrust on creating a tourism ecosystem for the long term growth of tourism in India, he feels. E-passport by 2023 would
be a step that would place India among the developed nations and create a seamless foreign travel for Indians, Hira said, adding that this
would also enhance the credibility of the Indian passports. “The renewed thrust on the development of infrastructure in the North-East given in this budget will also boost tourism in this highly potential region that has been neglected for quite some time,” he said.

Hira added: “As a business person we have to be greedy and always wanting more from the budget so it is justified to say that we were expecting much more, at least in direct benefits which we did not get”.

 

February 1, 2022

Defining luxurious tourism (TravTalk 1st Feb Issue)- Prateek Hira at Dubi Expo

Filed under: News — admins @ 11:18 am

TravTalk 1st February 2022 issue carries a report on Prateek Hira’s address on ‘Luxury Tourism in India’  at Dubai Expo….


Defining luxurious tourism

India has a lot to offer as tourism destination with its rich heritage, culture and tradition. The country has also evolved into a luxury travel destination that is globally recognised.

TravTalk-1st Feb IssueIn the past decade, India has evolved as a tourism destination and the transformation continues in the form of luxury travel. Historical palaces, forts and boutique hotels in the country are full of stories and offer unique experience for guests, and adding to this is the luxury travel.

Speaking at the India Pavilion at Expo2020 Dubai about luxury tourism in India, Prateek Hira, President and CEO – Tornos, and Director, River Rhapsody, said, “In the past, luxury travel was understood to mean opulence, ultra-comfort and high-end services, but the definition has evolved. Authenticity and meaningful journeys are now at the heart of luxury travel.”

He added, “There was a time when there was a scarcity in India and in many other places, but not so now. Getting a deeper understanding of and immersion into local cultures are the main benefits of luxury travel. People like to travel, participate and learn, and that’s what luxury travel has become. Due to the increase in purchasing power and evolving lifestyles of consumers, what was considered a luxury yesterday has become a necessity today for most of us, a necessity for travel, and is available in abundance in this market.”

India has some of the best luxury properties for experiencing opulence and luxury stays.Homegrown brands such as Taj, Oberoi and Lalit have established themselves in the luxury conscious market. Globally, the market has fairly realised the potential India has in luxury. “India is a country where every 50 miles the history, the language, the culture, the cuisine and the crafts change, and each of them offers something unique. Today, luxury travel is about understanding the destination and being able to access places that are not as touristy or not readily available to mass tourists,” Hira said.


Full magazine available to download as PDF on : http://travtalkindia.com/pdf/2022/TTFeb1st22.pdf

 

 

 

January 28, 2022

Indian Mutiny Event Dateline

Filed under: Lucknowledge — admins @ 8:39 am

Important Events 1857 – 1858 – 1859 – 1860

1857

22 January
The sepoys at Dumdum become uneasy about the new cartridges.
January- March
Unrest among the sepoys on the greased cartridge question; outbreaks at Berhampore and Barrackpore, the chapaties pass from village to village.
24 April
Meerut 3rd Light Cavalry; rebellious conduct followed by court-martial.
10 May
Meerut 3rd Light Cavalry, 11th N.I. revolt. Rebels kill officers and other Europeans and burn bungalows, set off for Delhi.
11 May
Rebels arrive Delhi; proclaim Bahadur Shah Zafar as Emperor, murder Europeans, Delhi troops, 5th Light Fd Battery Foot Artillery, 3rd Bn 2nd company,38th N.I. and 54th N.I. all Revolt. Magazine blown up by Lt. Willought by and handful of British, European survivors retreat first to Flagstaff Tower, and then Karnal. Delhi and surrounding area in the control of the rebels.
20 May
At Aligarh a portion of the 9th N.I revolt, followed at Mainpuri and Bulandshahr on the 22nd and Etawa on 23rd, by the remainder of the regiment.
30 May
Revolt at Lucknow, 7th Light Cavalry, and (portion of ) the 13th N.I., 48th N.I. amd 71st N.I. Outbreak at Mathura; rebels march to Delhi. Battle of the Hindun River.
31 May
Bareilly, 18th N.I. , 68th N.I. , 15th Light Fd Battery, and 8th lrreg,Cavalry revolt. Khan Bahadur Khan , a government pensioner takes the lead, and is proclaimed ruler under the King of Delhi. At Shahjahanpur the 28 th N.I. revolts and attacks the Christians. At Agra the native regiments are disarmed; Moradabad in open revolt.
1 June
At Morababad the 29th N.I. revolts. Sepoys at Mathura shoot officers and march for Delhi Outbreak at Budaon.
2 June
5th N.I. revolts at Saharanpur.
3 June
At Neemuch the entire force revolt viz. 1st Light Cavalry, 4th Troop 1st Brigade horse artillery,15th Light Fd Battery,72nd N.I. N.I. At Azamgarh the 17th N.I. revolts. At Sitapur the 41st N.I. revolts with particular ferocity against the European officers civilians Abbas Ali proclaim himself the ruler in Moradabad.
4 June
Partial revolt at Benares by 37th N.I. General Neill arrives and disarms some troops. Revolt at Kanpur by 2nd light cavalary, 1st N.I. ,74th N.I. , and 56th N.I. First Group of Europeans leaves Fatehgarh.
5 June
53rd N.I. Joins the revolt at Kanpur, General Wheeler calls all Europeans and Christians into his entrenchments
6 June
Siege of Wheeler’s entrenchment at Kanpur begins. Nana Sahib joins the rebels and is proclaimed Peshwa,12th N.I. at Jhansi revolt, and massacre of the European follows; 4th company 9th Bn Artillery at Azamgarh revolt. Nawab of Rampur visits Moradabad take charge.
8 June
The Battle of Badle ki serai in Delhi; British troops occupy the Ridge, and the ‘siege’ of the Delhi begins. At Phillour the 3rd N.I. revolt. At Faizabad the 22nd N.I., and the 13th Lt. Fd Battery 5th Bn 2nd company revolt.
11 June
Brigadier General James Neill arrives at Allahabad. Jhansi rebels leave for Delhi.
12 June
Massacre by Nana Sahib of 130 Europeans fugitives from Fatehgarh at Bithur.
15 June
Wajid Ali Shah, ex-king of Awadh and chief councillors imprisoned in Fort William in Calcutta. Bareilly Brigade reaches Moradabad en route for Delhi.
16 June
Maulvi Liaqat Ali files from Allahabad. Nawab’s rule proclaimed at Fatehgarh.
18 June
At Fatehgarh the 10th N.I. (previously loyal) eventually break into revolt. Mewati and pathan
villages in Allahabad district attacked and destroyed by the British.
25 June
At Kanpur The Nana Shahib offers terms to Wheeler in the entrenchment. Revolt at Malthone.
Sack of Delhi.
27 June
Massacre at Satichaura Ghat, Kanpur.
28 June

Fatehgarh Fort besieged by rebels. Nagode gaol. Broken into.
30 June
British defeated at Chinhat ; Lucknow Residency surrounded and besieged. Bulandshahr captured by Walidad Khan.
2 July
Bakht Khan arrives in Delhi with the Bareilly brigade. Pearson’s Battery and Cavalry revolt at Agra.
4 July
Massacre at Rampore on Ganges of European fugitives from Fatehgah / Farrukhabad. Sir Henry Lawrence, dies in the Lucknow Residency.
7 July
General Havelock leaves Allahabad en route for Kanpur.
12 July
Fatehpur occupied by Havelock.
15 July
Action at Anog ( Renaud killed), And at Pandu Nadi. Massacre of the Ladies i.e. Bibighur massacre at Kanpur.
16 July
Nana Sahib defeated by Havelock at Fatehpur, and First Battle of Kanpur. Nana Sahib orders all Bengali Babus to be apprehended.
17 July
Havelock enters Kanpur and Nana Sahib retreats to Bithur.
25 July
The Danapur Brigade revolts, i.e. The 7th N.I., 8th N.I. & 40th N.I.
27 July
Siege of Arrah House Begins.
28 July
Parade Ground Massacre at Farruckhabad (Fatehpur). Azimgarh evacuated by the British.
29 July
Havelock defeats rebels at Unnao.
31 July
The large rebel force from Mhow and Indore arrives at Gwalior, leaving Scindia helpless to prevent their onwards march towards Agra.
3 August
Arrah house relived by Major Eyre.

5 August
Havelock defeats the rebels at Bashiratganj. Kunwar Singh reported to have proclaimed himself King of Shahbad.
8 August
Khan Bahadur Khan’s forces from Bareilly reported as advacing to attack Nainital. Rebels’ gunpowder factory in Delhi blown up.
11 August
Eyre burns Kunwar Singh’s palace at Jagdishpur.
12 August
Havelock defeats Awadh rebels in the third battle of Bashiratganj
13 August
Havelock defeats Awadh rebels in the third battle of Bashiratganj
14 August
Havelock Column under John Nicholson arrives at Delhi. Kunwar Singh arrives at Sassaram.
16 August
Havelock defeats the forces of Nana Sahib at Bithur.
17 August
Sir Colin Campbell takes over duties as British Commander-in- Chief.
19 August
At Ferozepur the 10th Light Cavalry revolt Kunwar Singh at Akbarpur. Amar Singh threatens to
burn Dehri.
20 August
Kunwar Singh at Rohtasgarh.
25 August
Firoz Shah, Shahzada, placed on the musund at Mandsaur.
26 August
Outbreak at Mandsaur.
29 August
At Peshawar the disarmed 51st N.I. revolts. Many are slaughtered. Kunwar Singh arrives in
Ramgarh and plunders Ghorawal.
7 September
Kunwar Sngh closes road to Rewa.
8 September
Kuwar Singh marches through Mirzapur and reported to have arrived in Rewa. Jung Bahadur’s Gurkhas arrive at Jaunpur.

14 September
British begin the assault on Delhi.
19 September
Havelock and Outram set out for Lucknow from Kanpur.
20 September
After a fierce fighting, Delhi finally conquered by the British.
21 September
Captain Hodson claims to have captured the King of Delhi, Bahadur Shah Zafar at Humayun’s Tomb.
22 September
Hodson murders the Mughal Princes.
25 September
Lucknow Residency relieved by Havelock, Neill and Tytler Killed, together with 600 other British casualties.
29 September
Kunwar Singh reaches Banda. Said to be accompanied by 1800 of Danapore rebels.
5 October
Walidad Khan reaches Bareilly with 500 followers. Greathed’s Column meets opposition at Aligarh.
8 October
Nawab of Banda attacks fortress of Ajaigarh.
13 October>
Mirza Bakhtwar Shah and Mirza Mendu, sons of the king of Delhi, tried by the British and shot beside the Jumna.
15 October
Gwailor Contingent join the rebels. Outbreak at Kotah.
19 October
Kunwar Singh with the 40th BNI reaches Kalpi via Banda.
29 October
Tatya Tope with Gwalior Contigent arrives at Jalaun.
7 November
Gwalior Contingent and 40th BNI (with Kunwar Singh) join in and begin advancing to Kanpur.
17 November
Sir Colin Campbell relieves and evacuates the Lucknow Residency, leaving Outram at the Alambagh; rebels see his withdrawal from Awadh as a great victory.

24 November
Havelock dies of dysentery; buried in the Alambagh.
27 November
Gwalior Contingent attacks Nawabganj (Unnao) and forces the British to retire into entrenchments.
3 December
Campbell dispatches all the ladies and sick, ex Lucknow Residency, to Allahabad.
6 December
Campbell defeats Tatya Tope in the third battle of Kanpur.

1858

6 Janurary
Campbell re-occupies Fatehgarh. Sir Hugh Rose begins Central India Campaign.
7 Janurary
Trial of Bahadur Shah Zafar begins in The Red Fort,Delhi. (ends on March 9th)
14 Janurary
Rani of Jhansi issues a proclamation against the British “Victory of religion”
23 January
Rebels mustering again at Kalpi.
28 Janurary
Fortress of Rahatgarh taken by Rose.
3 February
Sir Hugh Rose relieves Sagar.
5 February
Action at Ayodhya between rebels Jung Bahadur’s Gurkhas.
7 February
General Whitlock with Madras troops arrives in Jabalpur.
10 February
Nana Sahib at Naubatganj.
12 February
Kunwar Singh reported to be arriving at Ayodhya.
18 February
Proclamation issued by Firoz Shah at Bareilly.
25 February

Nana Sahib reported to be at Kalpi.
1 March
Tehri troops beaten by Rani’s forces. Charkhari captured.
2-21 March
Campbell retakes Lucknow ; drives out the rebels led by the Maulvi of Faizabad and the begum of Awadh. Lucknow stormed on 14th.
16 March
Nana Sahib reported to be at Shahjahanpur.
17 March
Brigadier Stuart takes Chanderi by storm. Battle of Atraulia, Victory for Kunwar Singh.
18 March
Nawab of Farrukhabad and Banda, Raja Tej Singh of Mainpuri, Khan Bahadur Khan of Bareilly, Walidad Khan specifically excluded from the benefit. (i.e. Free pardon etc.) of British Proclamation offering a reward of rupees one lakh to rebel betraying Nana Sahib.
21 March
Rose arrives at Jhansi.
22 March
Millman besieged in Azimgarh by Kunwar Singh.
23 March
Investment of Jhansi begins.
24 March
Explosion in Khan Bahadur Khan’s gunpowder factory at Bareilly. Nana Sahib arrives at Bareilly.
26 March
Kunwar Singh occupies Azamgarh.
1 April
Battle of Betwa River. Rose defeats Tatya Tope.
3 April
Jhansi captured and sacked.
5 April
Jhansi fort taken by the British. Rani, with her step-son, reaches Kunch.
6 April
Lord Mark Kerr relieves Azamgarh.
15 April

General Walpole defeated at Royah; Brigadier Adrian hope killed.
16 April
Kunwar Singh driven Azamgarh by General Lugarh.
17 April
Rao Sahib issues proclamation to Chiefs of Bundelkund. Kunwar Singh attacked by Brigadier
Douglas near Azamgarh.
18 April
Battle of Banda.
21 April
Kunwar Singh crosses the Ganges at Sheopur Ghat and is mortally wounded while doing so.
22 April
Princes Firoz Shah reaches Moradabad.
23 April
Kunwar Singh defeats the British under Le Grand at Jagdishpur. Rose captures Kalpi.
24 April
Forces of Nawab of Rampur drive Firoz Shah from Moradabad.
26 April
Death of Kunwar Singh.
28 April
Rao Sahib encamped at Jalalpur to oppose Whitlock Gukha army reaches Faizabad and Ayodhya.
3 May
Maulvi Ahmadullah Shah, with large force comes from Mohammadi to Shahjahanpur.
6 May
Battle of Bareilly, included the famous change of the Ghazis of whom 133 were bayoneted.
Bareilly taken but rebel leaders escaped.
8 May
Battle of Kunch, Rose defeats Tatya Tope.
10 May
General Lugard occupied Jagdishpur.
11 May
Amar Singh defeated by Corfield near Piru but manages to escape. Battle of Shahjahpur.
13 May
Rebels Menace British position and camp at Jagdishpur.

15 May
Rebel leaders including Nana Sahib, Khan Bahadur Khan and Maulvi Ahmadullah Shah all in vicinity of Shahjahanpur.
22 May
Battle of Kalpi, Rose captures the arsenal of Kalpi.
24 May
Second Battle of Shahjahanpur rebels defeated by Campbell and driven back to Mohammadi but followed up; British occupy Mohammadi.
25 May
Hamirpur occupied by the British.
1 June
Rani of Jhansi, Rao Sahib and Tatya Tope capture Gwalior. Nawab of Banda also present. Lushkar and Gwalior fort occupied. Madho Singh captured by Rose.
12 June
Battle of Nawabganj; Sir Hope Grant defeats 16000 rebels in final decisive battle In Awadh. Amar Singh returns to Buxar. Khan Bahadur Khan attacks Shahjanpur.
15 June
Maulvi Ahmadullah Shah attacks Pawayan, and is killed.
16 June
Battle of Morar. Raja of Maulvi Ahmadullah Shah to the British at Shahjahanpur to claim the rewards.
17 June
Battle of Kota-Ki- Serai; death of Rani of Jhansi.
19 June
Battle of Gwalior. City is occupied.
20 June
Gwalior fort captured by Rose. Battle of Jaora. Alipur Scindia returns to Gwlior.
5 July
Banpur Raja surrenders to the British.
9 July
Tonk occupied by rebels, Firoz Shah reported to be with them.
10 July
Shahgarh raja surrenders. Rebel force reaches Rampur.
11 July
Ramnagar occupied by the rebels.

26 July
Pawayan and Shahjahanpur reported as ‘seriously threatened’ by Awadh rebels.
27 July
Force besieging Shahganj breaks up.
31 July
Sir Hope Grant relieves Raja Man Singh besieged by rebels.
1 November
Queen Victoria’s proclamation abolishing the rule of the East India Company in India and instituting her own.
12 November
Battle of Shankarpur Beni Madho driven northwards, reported as joining up with Bala Rao.
25 November
Raja of Gonda defeated by Sir Patrick Grant, Gonda occupied.
5 December
Nana Sahib was reported was reported as crossing the Ganga between Fatehgarh and Kanpur.
6 December
Firoz Shah and Walidad Khan reported at Aroul.
17 December
Firoz Shah’s brief encounter with British force under Napier.
23 December
Bala Rao driven from Tulsipur and retreats into Nepal.
December
Bihar rebels finally dispersed.

1859

7 January
The rebellion in Awadh officially declared at an end.
9 January
Prince Firoz Shah cuts his way across Awadh and the Ganges; joins Tatya Tope temporarily.
29 January
Nawab of Farrukhabad arrives at Fatehgarh, under arrest.
28 March
Nana Sahib, Begum of Awadh reported to be at Butwal.
7 April

Khan Bahadur Khan, Begum of Awadh, Nana Sahib and Birjis Qadr reported to be in the fort of
Niacote in Nepal.
8 April
Tatya Tope betrayed and captured.
18 April
Tatya Tope hanged.
20 April
Nana Sahib sends Ishtiharnama to Queen Victoria. Petition to the English from Bala Rao.
8 July
State of peace officially declared throughout India.
24 September
The death of the Nana Sahib reported.
December
Amar Singh captured in the Terai by Jung Bahadur’s troops and handed over to the British.
9 December
Capture of Khan Bahadur Khan by Jung Bahadur reported.
7 December
Khan Bahadur Khan and Mammu Khan lodged in Lucknow Gaol.

1860

24 March
Khan Bahadur Khan of Bareilly hanged on the spot where he had raised the flag of revolt.
3 May
Jwala Prasad hanged at the Satichaura Ghat.

January 22, 2022

Ayodhya-Deepotsav

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — admins @ 6:58 am

Deepotsav (also spelt as ‘Deepotsava’) in Ayodhya – An event that was planned and conceptualized by Tornos in 2016 is now a landmark event of Government of Uttar Pradesh since 2017. Ceremonial lighting of record number of earthen lamps is the highlight and then there is laser show and projection mapping detailing the return of Lord Rama along with his wife Mata Sita and younger brother Lord Laxmana mark the celebrations. 

Deepotsav celebration falls a day earlier than the actual Diwali (also called Deepavali) celebration and is a must visit. Tornos as a part of this package organises two days of tour to Ayodhya. The first day is about the visit to the temples of Ayodhya, curated lunch and stay at Ayodhya at a semi luxury home-stay and next day is for a morning visit of the Ghat, boating on the sacred river Saryu and finally privileged participation in the celebration Deepotsava. This includes VVIP access to our cars and guests and seating in an exclusive “Tornos Guests’ Enclosure” for best view and photography.             

Cost :

On request (info@tornosindia.com)

Starting Time :

2 days before Diwali or a day before if not opting for tour of Ayodhya and stay there. Pickup is from Lucknow at 9 am (a bit of flexibility in leaving time from Lucknow)

2022 – 22 October

2023 – 10 November

2024 – 30 October

2025 – 19 October

Expected Duration :

2 Days (44 hours) / 1 Day (12 hours)

Remarks :

This tour can also be taken only for Deepotsav participation eliminating the night stay and tour of Ayodhya. Deepotsav dates are :- 2022 – 23 October; 2023 – 11 November; 2024 – 31 October ; 2025 – 20 October.

Driving time from Lucknow to Ayodhya is 2 hours. 

January 21, 2022

Ayodhya Tour (Excursion Ex Lucknow)

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — admins @ 10:46 am

(same day return trip from Lucknow to Ayodhya. 11-12 hours, including driving time, visits and activities)

Post early breakfast we will leave Lucknow for Ayodhya (150 km / 2 hrs). En route a bio-break at an identified facility. (ideal time to leave is by 0730 hrs but we can shift it to another option with a bit of changes in the programme if we intend to leave at 1000 hrs) 

Upon arrival we will be met by our Ayodhya Tour Manager who will now lead the tour and get us a privileged access into the temples.

We will visit Hanuman Gari – the seat of Lord Hanuman who sits on a hilltop to guard the holy city of Ayodhya. We will later visit Kanak Bhawan where we will attend the forenoon temple closure aarti. 

We will then reach a 150 year old temple where we will lunch with the head priest. A special prayer will be performed at this temple and after the offering of Bhog (lunch to the deity), we will be served lunch in the temple on a floor level setting and on a dry-leaf plate (pattal) and earthen-pottery. This lunch has been prepared hygienically under supervision our expert team and is a very privileged and a blessed meal. Later spend some time with the priest to understand the ethos of Ayodhya, its people, lifestyle and connect spiritually with the city where Lord Rama was born.  

Post lunch we will visit Ram Janam Bhoomi, the place of birth of Lord Rama. Later we drive to the temple workshop where stones are being carved to be placed in the under-construction Rama Temple. 

Also visit Saryu Ghat and enjoy a short joy-ride on the sacred river Saryu. Tea will be served on the boat while you get to see Ayodhya’s temple facade and listen to the stories connected to River Saryu.

As an option visit a few temples at the Ghat and then if you wish you may attend the evening Saryu Aarti (this takes place at the sunset and time is subject to change based on the season which effects the sunset). This Aarti too is a privileged experience as not only it will give you a chance to perform Aarti but also that it will be for your well-being.   

ADD-On OPTION: Kanchan Bhawan the starting point of our Mokshdayani Walk. Walking through the stretch by the side of Saryu river we will finally reach Nageshwarnath temple, from here we reach the river-ghat to board our boat. – For an ADD-ON SPECIAL Cost INR 1000 per person (if along with this package)

We will now board our car and return to Lucknow, to reach by late dinner time.

Highlights : In Ayodhya visit of Ram Janam Bhoomi, A short motor boat ride on Saryu river and diya-offering (earthen lamps); Lunch at the temple with the priest.

Cost :

INR 9,000 per person (operates on minimum 2 guests) – SPECIAL PRICE (Limited Offer)

Starting Time : 

7:30 – 8:30 am (Flexible)

Expected Duration : 

11-12 hours

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive tour.

*Pickup time from city hotels.  Timings are flexible and may be altered after prior discussion.

Expect to return by dinner to Lucknow.

 

January 18, 2022

Expectations from budget-2022 – Prateek Hira tells TravTalk for its January Issue

Filed under: News — admins @ 7:07 am

“This financial year will pave the way for better times ahead. I hope for a three-pronged budget, focused on the revival of inbound tourism by way of free or low-cost tourist visas, short-term tourist visas on arrival (not e-visas) for select countries, and a temporary exemption of GST for inbound travellers. On another front, I wish to get a window of income tax exemption on businesses for three years to rebuild working capital and restart the businesses. At the policy level, I wish for a larger budgetary allocation for the MOT for a well-planned, researched, and structured marketing plan to revive the tourist traffic. The tourism industry, for the third time, is pinning its hope on the annual budget.” – Prateek Hira (President & CEO – Tornos).Prateek Hira talks on budget

January 17, 2022

Travel Trends – 2022 by Prateek Hira published in TravTalk

Filed under: News — admins @ 7:30 am

(TravTalk – 2nd Fortnight Issue – Jan’22. Prateek Hira’s inputs )

Watch out for travel trends in 2022 – “The exploration of lesser known places will be a dominant trend, with the kind of knowledge today’s travellers have gained” – Prateek Hira


TravTalk Interview of Prateek HiraPeople have learnt to spend on holidays much more and make it a part of their annual budget, which is encouraging for the industry. Prateek Hira, IATO Chapter Chairman, Uttar Pradesh; President & CEO, Tornos and Director, River Rhapsody said, “Indian travellers who were till now spending large amounts only on their foreign travel (outbound) have learnt to spend similarly large amounts within India too, thus domestic travel is no more a budget travel business. I foresee this trend growing further in 2022. This will make our travel economy more stable, self-reliant and also attract a lot of high-end travel businesses in the domestic travel segment”.

He further added, “Small and personalised travel companies will gain ground as travellers will have many more questions than they ever had and this new

class of travellers may not be so happy dealing with large tour companies that, in spite of their best efforts, may not be able to cater to this demand so well.” And the same will apply to B2B dealings in terms of dealings with large DMCs. This trend will bring regional players and small operators more prominently into the mainstream market.

The travel industry saw a change in 2021 when people went to places that were less crowded and less popular. This will continue in 2022 as people explore new destinations, which is one of the most expected trends. “Travel till now has been quite unevenly distributed in India. With the kind of knowledge that travellers of today have gained, the exploration of lesser-known places will be a dominant trend, and thereby, lesser known destinations will see an upsurge of tourists, “said Hira.

He continued, “The distinction between travel businesses such as inbound, domestic, outbound, and so on will become diluted, and the new-age tour operator will mean the ‘one who offers tours to travellers’ rather than in the area of descriptive geographical boundaries. “Operators will reinvent themselves and get into new travel verticals that otherwise they were resisting to ramp up their revenue sources.”

January 8, 2022

Prateek Hira, President & CEO of Tornos speaks at India Expo – Economic Times reports

Filed under: News — admins @ 6:00 am

India is a luxury destination by virtue: Prateek Hira at Tourism Fortnight in Expo 2020 Dubai

Sharing his thoughts on luxury tourism in India during a session at India Pavilion : https://travel.economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/events/international/india-is-a-luxury-destination-by-virtue-prateek-hira-at-tourism-fortnight-in-expo-2020-dubai/88756088

January 1, 2022

The Week – “Fascinating facts about some of the most iconic buildings in Lucknow”

Filed under: News — admins @ 7:40 am

(The Week – https://www.theweek.in/theweek/statescan/2021/12/19/fascinating-facts-about-some-of-the-most-iconic-buildings-in-lucknow.html) – By Puja Awasthi/ Photographs By Salil Bera Issue Date: December 26, 2021 

Monument, memorial, mausoleum or landmark -no building is ever just that. From the depth of their foundations to the sweep of their canopies, buildings are dialogues embracing geographical and human spaces. They tell tales; some forgotten, some readily remembered.

The restoration [of the Constantia] required “a sense of affection” apart from the more practical money and planning, said Carlyle McFarland, principal, La Martiniere College, Lucknow.

And many, like Lucknow’s Husainabad Clock Tower – India’s tallest mechanical clock tower – add to the script of some of the most important stories of the present. In January 2020, this tower became the backdrop to protests against the Citizenship (Amendment) Act. Standing at a height of around 220ft, it is referred to as the country’s Big Ben—a tenuous connect at best. It has a mix of various styles that influenced its architect Richard Roskell Bayne during his travels through Cordoba, Spain, and Marrakech, Morocco. (The Big Ben is in the Gothic Revival style).
In 2010, two Lucknow residents – Capt Paritosh Chauhan, who is serving in the merchant navy, and Akhilesh Agarwal, a mechanical engineer – volunteered to get the long-dead clock running again. They discovered that the original movement was gone; the bronze and gunmetal used in its six foot long and three foot wide clockwork was stolen. There were no original drawings and manuals to help. The best guide was the bench on which the clock rested, with holes for where the shafts of the movement had gone in.

Chauhan and Agarwal describe it as the “DNA of the clock”, from which they had to piece together a dinosaur-like being.

Since 2012, when it started ticking again, the machine has been patchily managed. It works only intermittently. The duo says that the upkeep requires “the right attitude, commitment and skilled craftsmen”—which they cannot ensure, as they are not part of the Husainabad Trust that manages the tower and other properties.

Somewhat better preserved is the Rumi Darwaza, a public gateway, which is the symbol most often used to depict Lucknow in travel literature. There is speculation that it is similar to a portal in Constantinople (now Istanbul)—in recognition of which the Darwaza was called Kustuntunia in the 19th century. Others have seen in it a resemblance to the Sublime Porte of the Ottomans. Regardless of its foreign references, behind the Darwaza’s construction by Nawab Asaf-ud-Daula lay a humane story. In 1784, as a great famine swept through the land, the Darwaza was conceived to give employment to some 20,000 people.

Some monuments have a better chance of speaking for themselves. The Constantia, one of the homes of Lucknow’s most popular European resident Claude Martin, is one such landmark. A Frenchman, Martin became a major general in the British East India Company’s Bengal Army. The French Baroque building today houses La Martiniere College, one of India’s best-known schools for boys, and is a popular destination for movie shoots and magazine spreads.

The centrepiece of this two-century-old structure is a tower crowned by a dome. Under this dome is a chapel, adorned with figures and frescoes in the Wedgwood style. In 2013, the school’s current principal, Carlyle McFarland, initiated a restoration, driven more by urgent concerns such as crumbling walls. On a property that was originally around 400 acres, repairs were not new. However, the triumph of this restoration lay most visibly in its ornamental aspects and staggering attention to detail.

McFarland said the stucco work was as close to the original as available information revealed. Gone, for instance, were the mango leaves that had replaced the original acanthus leaves of the decoration, simply because artisans who made the interim repairs had no ready references for original Greek ornamentation.

The restoration required “a sense of affection” apart from the more practical money and planning, said McFarland, who is an alumnus. In 2016, these efforts were recognised by the French government, which conferred a medal of honour for distinguished service on Ansaruddin, the painter who led the repairs.

The Château de Lyon, another home owned by Martin, has been put recently on the tourist map after the larger building it is part of was thrown open to the public. This Lucknow mansion is named after Martin’s birthplace in France.

Prateek Hira, the president of Tornos, a company that describes itself as an ‘experiential travel company’, said that the residence offered a “fuller experience” of the evolution of Martin’s architectural style, which was perfected over several structures in and around Lucknow. It is thus a template from which Lucknow can be better understood.
The wonders of the structure, better known as Kothi Farhat Baksh, are still being unravelled. Its unique feature was rooms that were submerged in the waters of the Gomti River; these rooms functioned as an automatic cooling system for the floors above.

Meanwhile, conversations about the schoolboys who walked Constantia’s hallways are carried on in one of Lucknow’s most visited landmarks—the Residency. The building was the official home of the British resident general at Awadh, and was besieged for more than five months during the revolt of 1857. It was here that the British suffered their worst losses, before recapturing the city on November 17, 1857.

This siege, the stuff of military folklore, also saw schoolboys being called upon to serve the British army—for the first time ever. The original Residency was a complex of 28 buildings, of which only six remain intact.
Its importance however remains unchanged.

“It is as significant to the besieged and the besiegers,” said Vipul B. Varshney, the convenor of the Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage, Lucknow.

Varshney, who has organised heritage walks around the complex, said that if there was just one monument in Lucknow that the British tourists had on their must-visit list, it was the Residency—especially its cemetery.
A different connection to the world is found at the Rauza-e-Kazmain, a replica of the mausoleums of the seventh and ninth Imams in Iraq. Unlike the city’s other, perhaps better known Imambaras, this one has two large minarets and four domes covered in brass—as opposed to the more commonly found stone. The ones in the original shrine are covered in gold.

Completed during the reign of Nawab Wajid Ali Shah in 1852, its building was initiated by one Jagganath Agarwal, a Hindu who upon conversion had taken the name Sharaf-ud-daullah. It is thus a fitting tribute to the city’s past of rich communal amity.

Athar Abbas, a maulana who serves at the mausoleum, said that the replica in Lucknow, too, had wish-granting powers like the originals in Baghdad. “It is faith which makes it so beautiful,” he said. Faith being just one element of the rich dialogues that these buildings symbolise and sustain.

(The Week – https://www.theweek.in/theweek/statescan/2021/12/19/fascinating-facts-about-some-of-the-most-iconic-buildings-in-lucknow.html) – By Puja Awasthi/ Photographs By Salil Bera Issue Date: December 26, 2021 

Tornos sees potential in Kushinagar – Prateek Hira’s interview in Rashtriya Sahara

Filed under: News — admins @ 6:29 am

Kushinagar is being seen as a tourist destination with a huge potential. A place where Lord Buddha attained ‘Mahaparinirvana’ has much more than just the main excavation site and the main temple. A lot of work has been done by the District Administration under its District Magistrate Mr. Rajalingham and the Joint Magistrate Mr. Purna Borah. President & CEO of  Tornos recently visited Kushinagar for the second time and took stock of all the development work along with Mr. Tarit Roy and Mr. Himanshu Shekhar who are assisting Tornos to understand Kushinagar as an immersive destination and work around it to develop it as a minimum two to three nights destination. Prateek also gave an interview to Rashtriya Sahara on this visit….

  

December 31, 2021

Immense work done for Tourism in Uttar Pradesh – Prateek Hira addresses Times Conclave

Filed under: News — admins @ 10:14 am

“The kind of work that has been done to develop Uttar Pradesh as a tourist destination is commendable. The biggest example is Kashi Vishwanath Dham. Earlier, excuses were made that not much can be done for the uplift of Kashi Vishwanath temple as there were hygiene issues in the narrow lanes leading to the temple. The construction of Kashi Vishwanath Dham has proved that nothing is impossible,” said chairman, tourism committee, FICCI UP state council, Prateek Hira.

“Kashi Vishwanath Dham has broken all previous records of tourist footfall. Ayodhya and Vindhyachal corridors will also be developed on similar lines,” he said.

December 24, 2021

Responsible Tourism

Filed under: Uncategorized — admins @ 9:29 am

RTSOI

SUSTAINABLE TOURISM CRITERIA FOR INDIA (STCI) – FOR THE TOUR OPERATORS FOLLOWED BY TORNOS

A.1

STCI PRINCIPLES

 

Implement a Sustainability Management System

POTENTIAL INDICATORS

1. A Sustainability Management Plan exists that is appropriate to the business’ size and scale

2. Sustainability Management Plan considers:

• Environmental

• Socio-cultural

• Quality

• Health and Safety Issues

3. Scales with point systems:

i) System is implemented

ii) Sustainability Management Plan is communicated internally and externally

iii) Plan is integrated at decision-making level, includes monitoring, analysis and evaluation and adaptive management

iv) Stakeholder input and progress reported

v) System is comprehensive

vi) Plan includes environmental,

socio-cultural, quality, health and safety issues

A.2

Legal Compliance

• Compliance with all relevant legislation and regulations

• Procedure exists for maintaining and implementation of up-to-date list of legal requirements, according to market  practices, specially where the country is a signatory to international treaties

A.3

Employee Training

• Scale: Literature on all critical issues is available and provided to management staff.

STCI PRINCIPLES POTENTIAL INDICATORS SUSTAINABLE TOURISM CRITERIA FOR INDIA (STCI)- FOR THE TOUR OPERATORS SECTOR B1

A.4

Customer Satisfication

• Average Customer Satisfaction rating

• Corrective action plan exists

• Number or type of complaints received as percentage of total guests

• Percentage of complaints received that have been resolved

A.5

Promotional materials are accurate and complete and do not promise more than can be delivered by the business.

1. Scale:

i) Materials are accurate in description of services

ii) Materials are complete

2. Customer and/or Tour operators survey questions

(i) Marketing materials complete and accurate and not exaggerated

(ii) Marketing materials set realistic

 

STCI PRINCIPLES

POTENTIAL INDICATORS

A.6

Design and construction of buildings and infrastructure

 

A.6.1

Comply with local zoning and protected or heritage area requirements

Land use is in compliance with local zoning and protected or heritage area laws and regulations

 

A.6.2

Design and construction of  buildings and infrastructure

i) Design and construction reduce heating, cooling, lighting and water consumption through passive design appropriate to local conditions, and technology

iii) Buildings with emphasis on visual compatibility with the natural environment

iv) Transportation and circulation with emphasis on minimizing fossil-fuel consumption

v) Utility systems with an emphasis on energy-efficient heating, cooling and lighting, water conservation, waste water treatment; and solid waste management.

vi) Reduction of on-site and off-site development impacts on air, water and sound quality.

A.6.2.1

Sitting respects natural and cultural heritage surroundings

i) Archaeological, cultural heritage, and sacred sites have not been disturbed

ii) Endangered wildlife has not been displaced or habitat destroyed

iii) Buildings do not destroy scenic beauty

 

STCI PRINCIPLES

POTENTIAL INDICATORS

 

 

iv) Earth movements have been minimized

v) Water courses including aquifers and subterranean links have not been altered

vi) Runoff from buildings, parking lots, and grounds is channeled and filtered and harvested and reused.

vii) Location of buildings not over water bodies and wetlands, whether seasonal or permanent

viii) Location of buildings and roads not in designated no-building zones

ix) Vegetation disturbance has been minimized and restored with endemic and not exotic species

x) Gardens, green areas, golf courses and sporting fields use local and endemic vegetation where ever possible or grasses that are adapted to local climate

A.6.2.2

Design respects natural and cultural heritage surroundings

i) Existing historic and cultural buildings and landscapes have been restored, in vernacular idiom

ii) Buildings use regional construction materials, as long as these are obtained sustainably

iii) New buildings reflect regional vernacular architecture, and include regional art and crafts

iv) Existing structures have been restored on set heritage norms

A.6.2.3

Natural and cultural impact has been assessed

i) Environmental and social impact assessment has been completed

ii) Plans are in compliance with recommendations and are checked for continued compliance Land acquisition is legal

 

STCI PRINCIPLES

POTENTIAL INDICATORS

A.6.2.4

Land rights and acquisition respect natural and cultural heritage

i) Land acquisition is in accordance with all protected area or cultural heritage regulations; action should take into account fencing and animal corridor blocking issues.

ii) Local Community have not been involuntarily removed from the land.

iii) Where local communities or indigenous peoples have legal, traditional, collective, or customary rights over the possession and use of the land, the Stakeholders affected have had the opportunity to accept or reject the proposed use

iv) Use for tourism has been authorized with the prior informed consent of stakeholders affected including Panchayats and NGOs with a redressal mechanism in place

v) Number of unresolved complaints by local communities

A.6.3

Design and construction of buildings and infrastructure use locally appropriate principles of sustainable construction

A6.3.1 takes due cognizance of the vernacular idiom namely, oral, natural and built heritage

A6.3.2 Cost of environment safeguards to be part of project cost

i) Construction plan follows sustainable site design, and the plan incorporates use of architects and designers specialized in the vernacular idiom, conservation architects, landscape designers etc.

ii) Construction plan documents meet all STCI, with specific emphasis on risk areas of impact associated with construction

iii) Minimize within acceptable norms areas of vegetation disturbance, earth grading, and water channel alternation.

iv) Reduce wastes and emissions

v) Incorporate local materials and crafts into structures, native plants into landscaping, and local community consultations for programs and operations.

vi) Safe and clean workplace provided

 

STCI PRINCIPLES

POTENTIAL INDICATORS

A.6.4

Provide access for persons with Special Needs

i) Facilities and services are accessible to persons with special needs

ii) Level of accessibility is clearly communicated to the customer

A.7

Information about and interpretation of the natural surroundings, local culture and cultural heritage is provided to customers, as well as explaining appropriate behavior while visiting natural areas, living cultures, and cultural heritage sites

i) Company has interpretation program

ii) Company has delivery mechanism for interpretations (i.e., collateral, tour guide, podcast)

iii) Staff training programs in interpretation for tourism

iv) Interpretive materials are accurate

B

Maximize social and economic benefits to the local community and minimize negative impacts

 

B.1

The company actively supports initiatives for the communities social and infrastructure development including, among others, education, health, gender equity and environment care and sanitation

i) Annual gross income contributed to local* community for public benefit through commercial, in kind, or pro bono engagement

ii) Plan developed in collaboration with community

B.2

Local residents are employed, including in management positions. Training is offered as necessary.

 

 

STCI PRINCIPLES

POTENTIAL INDICATORS

B.3

Local and fair-trade services and goods provided by Micro, Small and  Medium Enterprises are purchased by the business, where available.

i) Purchases of services and goods from local providers

ii) Purchases that are fair trade purchases

iii) Facilities built using local material

iv) Purchasing policy gives priority to local and fair trade suppliers that meet quality and environmentally friendly criteria

v) Checklist of available local, sustainable goods, services, and contract services

vi) Local, sustainable goods, services and contract services utilized

vii) Local owned restaurants, services, and shops utilized on tours

B.4

The company provides the first option to Micro, Small and Medium Service Providers to develop and sell sustainable products that are based on the area’s nature, history, and culture, including food and drink, crafts, performing arts, agricultural products etc.

i) Company provides access to enterprises, including handicrafts, food and beverage, cultural performances, or other goods and services, to sell directly to guests

ii) Promotion of local products in marketing activities and services

iii) Number of local enterprises promoted

iv) Number of local jobs created as a result of company’s intervention

v) Number of new local enterprises incubated

 

STCI PRINCIPLES

POTENTIAL INDICATORS

B.5

A code of conduct for activities in indigenous and local communities has been developed, with the  consent of and in collaboration  with the community.

i) Appropriate code of behaviour or any other scaling mechanism is integrated into the operations Consultation and dialogue with the community and other stakeholders

B.6

The company has implemented a policy against commercial and sexual exploitation, particularly of women, children,  adolescents and tribal communities. 

Number of incidents reported with host destination authorities

B.7

The company is  equitable in hiring women and local minorities, including in management positions, while restraining child labor

i) Women and local minorities employees on staff is reflective of local demographics, both in management and non-management categories

ii) Internal promotions, by gender and by local and non-local aspects reflects local demographics

iii) Incidents of child labor as defined by the ILO

iv) Wage equality between men and women

B.8

International or national legal protection of employees is respected, and employees are paid a mandated wage nationally.

Salaries and benefits meet or exceed local, national and international regulations, whichever are higher. Payment is made into national social security system for qualified employees. Overtime is paid for hours worked beyond the established work week hours

 

STCI PRINCIPLES

POTENTIAL INDICATORS

 

 

and working hours do not exceed the legal maximums or those established by the ILO. All employees have the right to annual paid vacation. Health insurance or the equivalent is provided to all employees. Employees receive training and capacity building. Training and capacity building is provided for local community non-employee residents to develop qualified local labor force.

B.9

The activities of the company do not jeopardize the provision of basic services, such as water, energy, or sanitation, to local and neighboring communities.

 

C

Cultural Heritage Maximize benefits to cultural heritage and minimize negative impacts.

 

 

STCI PRINCIPLES

POTENTIAL INDICATORS

C.1

The company follows established guidelines and a code of behaviour for visits to culturally or  historically sensitive sites, in order to minimize visitor impact and  harmonize with visitor satisfaction

i) Company policy includes established guidelines or code of behavior

ii) Changes in site management plan based on annual easement

C.2

Historical and archeological artifacts are not sold, traded, or displayed, except as permitted by law.

i) Incidents and reports regarding inappropriate use of artifacts

ii) Company policy exists

iii) Company policy is implemented and executed effectively

C.3

The business contributes to the protection of local historical, archaeological, culturally, and spiritually important properties and sites, and does not impede access to them by local residents

i) Monetary and in-kind contribution to the protection of important properties and sites per unit sector activity, for instance per guest-night

ii) Local population accesses properties and sites

C.4

The business uses elements of local art, architecture, or cultural heritage in its operations, sustainable design, decoration, food, or shops, while respecting the intellectual property rights of local communities

i) Incidents and reports of exploitation of local intellectual property

ii) B.3 Indicators are also applicable

 

STCI PRINCIPLES

POTENTIAL INDICATORS

D

Maximize benefits to the environment and minimize negative impacts

 

D.1

Conserving Resources

 

D.1.1

Purchasing policy favors environmentally sustainable products for building materials, capital goods, food and consumables.

i) Percentage of purchases of goods and services from green or sustainable sources for building materials, capital goods, food and consumables

D1.2

Purchase of disposable and consumable goods is measured, and the business actively seeks ways to reduce their use. 

i) Purchasing policy requires re-usable, returnable and recycled goods, where available

ii) Waste management plan exists

iii) Packaging minimization programme

iv) Number of types and quantity of products in disposable containers.

D.1.3

Energy consumption should be measured sources indicated, and measures to decrease overall consumption should be adopted, while encouraging the use of renewable energy.

i) Total energy consumed per tourist specific activity such as guest-night, tourists, etc. per source or renewable versus non-renewable fuel

ii) Percentage of total energy from renewable sources

iii) Monetary investment in energy saving devices, technologies and renewable energy as a percentage of total energy costs and investments or total turnover

D.1.4

Water consumption should be measured, sources indicated, and measures to decrease overall consumption should be adopted.

i) Water management programme exists

ii) Change to availability and access to potable water as a result of company activities

iii) Total volume of water in kilolitres consumed per source per specific tourist activity such as guest-nights, visitors, etc

iv) Percentage of water-using equipment

 

STCI PRINCIPLES

POTENTIAL INDICATORS

 

 

and activities that employ a water conservation technique and rain harvesting techniques

D.2

Reducing Pollution

 

D.2.1

Greenhouse gas emissions from all sources controlled by the business are measured, and procedures are implemented to reduce and offset them as a way to achieve climate neutrality and go beyond to mitigate climate change impacts

i) Reduced direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight

ii) Initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions

iii) Carbon footprint, namely emissions less offsets, per tourist activity or guest-night

iv) Change in greenhouse gas emissions year on year

D.2.2

Wastewater, including grey water, is treated effectively and reused

i) Waste water plan, including treatment, exists

ii) Monitored water discharge by quality and destination

iii) Volume in liters waste water reused

D.2.3

A solid waste management plan is implemented, with quantitative goals to minimize waste that is not reused or recycled.

i) Total waste generated, in tones, by type and disposal method

ii) Kilograms of waste to landfill per sector specific activity, namely, guest-nights, visitors, revenue, etc.

iii) Amount of waste incinerated

iv) Number of incidents of hazardous spills

v) Percentage of total waste that is reused and recycled

D.2.4

The use of harmful substances, including pesticides, paints, swimming pool disinfectants, and cleaning materials, is

i) Hazardous materials not used

ii) Minimum Percentage of bio-degradable and low phosphate chemicals used to total chemicals

iii) low Pesticides in use per unit area

iv) Decreased usage of harmful substances

 

STCI PRINCIPLES

POTENTIAL INDICATORS

 

Minimized; substituted, when available, by non-harmful products; and all chemical use is optimally managed.

 

D.2.5

The business implements practices to reduce pollution from noise, light, run-off, erosion, ozone-depleting compounds, and air and soil contaminants.

i) See D.1.2- D.2.4 for indicators on air, water and soil contaminants

ii) Number and types of incidents and complaints

iii) Pollution management plan exists for emissions, effluents and waste

D.3

Conserving biodiversity, ecosystems and landscapes

 

D.3.1

Wildlife species are NOT harvested from the wild, consumed, displayed, sold, or internationally traded, as part of a regulated activity which ensures that these species remain  sustainably protected.

i) Company policy exists

ii) Company policy is communicated to staff

iii) Company policy is communicated to guests

iv) Sustainable management plan (see Criteria A.1)developed with scientific experts which includes strategies, current and future plans

D.3.2

No captive wildlife is held, except for properly regulated scientific activities, and living specimens of protected wildlife species are only kept by those authorized and suitably equipped

i) Sustainable management plan developed with scientific experts which includes strategies, current and future plans

ii) Conservation policies are included in employee training

iii) Existence of captive wildlife for uses other than breeding or rehabilitation

 

STCI PRINCIPLES

POTENTIAL INDICATORS

 

to house and care for them, where this is deemed scientifically necessary.

 

D.3.3

The business uses endemic species for landscaping and restoration, and takes measures to avoid the introduction of invasive alien or exotic species.

i) Company policy prohibits use of invasive alien species in gardens, landscapes and other areas of operation

ii) Plan exists for removal and restoration, where required

D.3.4

The business contributes to the support of biodiversity conservation, including supporting natural protected areas and areas of any biodiversity value.

i) Annual budget allocated to support natural protected areas and biodiversity conservation

ii) Land restoration area

iii) Habitats protected or restored area

iv) Whether assessment plan exists

D.3.5

Interactions with wildlife must not produce adverse effects on the viability of populations in the wild. Any disturbance of natural ecosystems is prevented, and the company contributes appropriately to provision of requisite safeguards and conservation management.

i) IUCN Red List and national conservation list species and habitats affected by the company’s operations with levels of extinction risk

ii) Habitats protected or restored by the company, including as part of participation in partnership projects by area

iii) Protected and high value land use owned or managed by the company in area and percentage

iv) Annual budget allocated by the company to restore or rehabilitate natural protected areas or  biodiversity  conservation

December 21, 2021

‘Incredible India’ has become passé (Prateek Hira’s comments to TTJ)

Filed under: News — admins @ 7:48 am

Prateek Hira, Chairman, IATO Uttar Pradesh Chapter, shares his thoughts: “This is the most apt topic in the present times. Two years have been really bad and so bad that the brand India has almost diluted. I personally feel that the term ‘Incredible India’ has become passé in the travel world in the past two years even more. Not only that India as a brand has to rebuild and reaffirm its image, but also each one of us in the tour business has to rebuild from scratch. I have always advocated to my industry brethren, to think like a startup, taking baby steps, realigning and re-engineering businesses to re-establish them in the changed environment.” “If there has been a setback because of COVID-19, the positive side is that every country has to restart from zero. Whichever countries are able to market first and maintain all Covid protocols and safety measures successfully will get the benefit, and be able to capture good tourism business. Under the same endeavor and to build up the campaign, ‘BRAND INDIA – The Road to Recovery’ theme was chosen as the theme for IATO Convention,”

TTJ carries Prateek's interview

https://traveltradejournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/TTJ-December-2021.pdf

UP devising new avatar for Ayodhya?

Filed under: News — admins @ 7:27 am

TravTalk (December-2021 issue) interviews President & CEO of Tornos Mr. Prateek Hira on the subject:

Prateek Hira, Chairman, IATO Uttar Pradesh Chapter and President & CEO, Tornos, Director,River Rhapsody, stated that Uttar Pradesh, being a big state, has many lesser known destinations that till now have not been brought forth or valued by the industry. COVID-19 gave a lot of time to tour operators to rediscover the state and replan tours with new flavours, so coming up with new itineraries will be an evolution and a welcome one. Speaking of changes in the travel itinerary of Uttar Pradesh, he said, “‘Changed’ in my opinion is a wrong word; a better word would be ‘evolved’. Just as products get redundant after a time when they reach their optimum sales, so does an itinerary. Law of diminishing returns very much applies here too,” said Hira.

He added, “Ayodhya is the newest, so it obviously requires much more focus and investment, which the government is doing in order to bring it at par with other developed tourist destinations in the state. Agra is one of the inbound feeder destinations, not only for the state of Uttar Pradesh but also for many other states in India, so it has been and will always be at the top of the chart.”

He further added, “Agra is one such destination that in itself is the crown of India’s tourist destinations, what with a robust and well-developed tourist infrastructure that is constantly growing. The Agra metro is one example of it. The introduction of multiple flights to Agra is another. The smart city project in Agra is yet another example of the ongoing development of Agra, which will benefit Agra’s tourism industry. The Government of Uttar Pradesh has also taken up the mammoth task of training guides in Agra and Fatehpur Sikri, which is a welcome step as it wants to revive Fatehpur Sikri as a must-do excursion from Agra. similarly, Bateshwar is being taken up with all seriousness and so is Chambal Sanctuary and the Lion Safari, which are now a part of the eco–tourism circuit of Uttar Pradesh where the state forest department is doing a lot of work. All these places fall in close proximity to Agra and will surely help Agra to increase the average length of stay and offer much more than just the Taj Mahal.”

Prateek Hira's interview on Ayodhya in TravTalk - December'21

http://travtalkindia.com/pdf/2021/TTDec2nd21.pdf

 

 

TravTalk carries Prateek Hira’s opinion about 2021

Filed under: News — admins @ 7:16 am

The year 2021 is not a business year, but a better way to call it would be to call it a year of “rebuilding business”. We have been through rebuilding, realigning, and re-engineering in a bid to create a strong foundation that was on a sabbatical during the pandemic. The objective is to lower our accumulated losses as soon as possible, re-breakeven, and grow again. Practically speaking, not only our business but other businesses in the sector, I hope, will take as many as three years in order to come to the pre-pandemic level. To reduce our pain and suffering, we have started to think and behave like a start-up, analysing the changed business environment. The re-gestation period will be based on new benchmarks rather than the pre-pandemic (2019-20) benchmarks. It has been a year of hope, optimism, rediscovery and learning for us!

TravTalk carries Prateek Hira's interview

http://travtalkindia.com/pdf/2021/TTDec2nd21.pdf

December 11, 2021

Ayodhya an example of Hindu Muslim Unity

Filed under: Lucknowledge — admins @ 7:09 am

Long before the bitter Babri Masjid-Ram temple issue began to cause social fissures and trigger sectarian violence in India, Muslim rulers of Avadh region built, patronised and protected Hindu temples, a powerful Hindu priest and historians told Gulf News.

One of the 12 provinces under the Mughal empire, the Avadh region included Ayodhya and was ruled by Nawabs from 1722 onward from capital Faizabad. During the rule of Shuja-ud-Daula, the third ruler of Avadh, relations between Hindus and Muslims were harmonious and official gazettes and history books have recorded examples of rich bonding between the two communities. At a time when the dominant narrative seeks to widen fissures in the society, researchers and writers told Gulf News that the glorious history of Avadh Nawabs must be retold to fight attempts to divide people.


Credits (Originally published in Gulf News) : ‘Ayodhya flashback: When Muslim Nawabs built Hindu temples’ – by : Bobby Naqvi, Gulf News UAE. 


Mahant Gyan Das, the head of priest of Hanumangarhi, Ayodhya’s most important temple, is a strong proponent of Hindu-Muslim harmony. As the head of the temple since 1962, Das is widely respected by residents and his opinion and guidance is sought by politicians and high ranking officials on several issues. “This temple was built in 1774 on the 52 bigha [over 20 acres] land gifted by Shuja-ud-Daula,” he told Gulf News in an interview at his house on Monday evening.

“The nawab had once fallen ill and his representative Tikait Rai requested him to take blessings of Hindu saint Baba Abhay Ram Das. The Nawab recovered from his illness after the saint visited him for eight days. Shuja-ud-Daula then gifted the land and built a fortress-type temple that you see here today,” says Das. Later, his son Mansoor Ali also visited the temple on many occasions and donated generously, he says.

This donation was recorded in royal documents to avoid any disputes in future. Das presses a buzzer to summon an aid: “Bring the Taamra Patra.” “The documents were being damaged by termites so we have made copies to preserve them,” he says while fondly posing for photographs holding the copies of royal decrees written in Persian language.

Harmonious tradition

Since then, the temple has continued a tradition of promoting harmony between the two communities. “There is an old mosque built over the land owned by Hanumangarhi temple. Since a Muslim ruler had built the temple, a piece of land was given to Muslims to build a mosque. Two years ago, I received a notice from Ayodhya municipality asking us to demolish the mosque as the structure had become weak. I refused to demolish the mosque and offered to have it renovated. At that time, I faced resistance from some Muslim hardliners who said the mosque would become impure if Hindus’ money is spent for renovation. I asked them whether the mosque had become impure when we built it,” says Das recalling the events.

“Then I asked my friend Sadiq Ali to take charge of the renovation and I offered to pay for it. Still, when some Muslims continued to object, Sadiq Ali told me that he would get the mosque renovated by collecting funds from the community. Today, a grand mosque exists at the site,” he adds. The temple management remains the legal owner of the mosque.

“A few years ago during Ramadan, I organised an iftar for Muslims at my house. I invited 100-150 people but more than 1,000 Muslims showed up at iftar.”

The Muslims broke fast and prayed at the house located inside the temple compound. “Soon after, some Hindu politicians and hardliners accused me of violating the sanctity of the temple by inviting Muslims. I said you had no objections from accepting a temple from a Muslim Nawab,” adds Das. Not satisfied with his logic, some hardliners then dared Muslims to organise a Hanuman Chalisaa at the mosque. Sadiq accepted the challenge and organised a prayer chanted by hundreds of Sadhus at the mosque.

“I am a Sadhu who left his home, loved ones and I have remained a staunch opponent of hardliners and strongly believe in humanity,” he says, adding, “You call Him Khuda, I call Him Ishwar.”


Credits (Originally published in Gulf News) : ‘Ayodhya flashback: When Muslim Nawabs built Hindu temples’ – by : Bobby Naqvi, Gulf News UAE. 


I cried when Saddam died

Mahant Das is well traveled and visited Dubai, New York, Washington and other cities. But he has a lot to say about his visit to Saudi Arabia and Iraq. He fondly remembers a meeting with Saddam Hussain in 1992. “He warmly hugged me and when I presented him a copy of Ramayana, he kissed it,” says Das. “I was very upset when Americans caught Saddam Hussain and cried when he was hanged.” Das also recalled his visit to Saudi Arabia and Brunei.

What historians say

Gulf News spoke to Lucknow based historian Roshan Taqui who said the Avadh Gazette is replete with instances of Muslim Nawabs building and donating money for upkeep and repairs of Hindu temples. “The Hanumangarhi still has a Persian plaque proclaiming that the temple was built by Shuja-ud-Daula who ruled Avadh region from 1754 to 1774,” says Taqui. “The history of Avadh is replete with examples of Ganga-Jamuni tehzeeb and all the Nawabs had Hindu administrators for smooth governance,” he says.

“During my research on conservation of old buildings, I had seen the royal decrees kept in Uttar Pradesh state archives. The royal decree recorded gifting of the land and construction of Hanumangarhi temple,” he says. “Moreover, during the rule of Nawab Wajid Ali Shah, an attempt to take over Hanumangarhi and Sita Rasoi by some Muslim hardliners was crushed by the Avadh ruler’s soldiers. The hardliners led by a Muslim cleric Amir Ali were killed by the Nawab’s Muslim soldiers during an assault in Bhelsar, near Rudauli. Over 300 Muslim soldiers of the Nawab also died in the assault,” he says, emphasising that Avadh rulers provided protection to Hindu temples.

Author and researcher Yogesh Pravin says Shuja-ud-Daula’s father Saadat Ali Khan also patronised Hindu temples. “All these examples are well recorded in government archives and libraries and available for reference,” says Pravin. “The rulers of Avadh worked for harmonious relations between the communities and their work is well recorded in history,” he adds.

November 28, 2021

Nihari in Lucknow

Filed under: Lucknowledge — admins @ 8:52 am

When Umrao Jaan was being shot in the early 1980s, the cast and crew of the Rekha-starrer film would visit Raheem’s regularly. “I was too young then, so I don’t have any memory, but my father told me that the entire cast ate at our restaurant on more than one occasion and Farooq Shaikh had loved the nihari,” says Bilal Raheem Ahmad, one of five brothers who run the restaurant now.

At 8 pm in old Lucknow’s Chowk area, Raheem’s hotel is one of the busiest spots in the area. Most customers thronging the restaurant, in a basement near the Tehseen mosque, are there for the nihari kulcha — meat stew with baked flatbread. The nihari, which is traditionally a breakfast dish, is available all day at Raheem’s. In the alley leading to the restaurant, one can smell the kulchas being baked on the tandoor from a distance. After entering the basement, the aroma changes to that of slow-cooked meat.

Bilal says the delicacy has always been the bestselling item at his restaurant, which was started by his great grandfather Haji Abdul Ghani in around 1920. The family belongs to old Lucknow’s Chowk area. The restaurant started selling the nihari kulcha in the 1940s under Haji Abdul Ghani’s son and Bilal’s grandfather Haji Abdul Raheem, after whom the restaurant is named. “It was Raheem sahab who invented the ghilaf kulcha which is served with the nihari,” says Bilal, 48, who generally sits at the restaurant’s counter every day from 5.30 pm to 11 pm.

After Haji Abdul Raheem, who ran the restaurant till 1983, the restaurant was taken over by Raheem’s father Fakruddin, who managed it till 2000, after which Bilal and his four brothers — Manzoor Ahmad (60), Mohammed Usama (47), Mohammed Shuaib (40) and Zaid Ahmad (37) — run it.

“The word ghilaf means a cover. The ghilaf kulcha has two layers which makes it so special. The upper layer has flour, ghee and creamy milk, while the lower layer has flour and yeast which makes the kulcha rise. The nihari is cooked overnight, for 6-7 hours, on very low heat over wood,” says Bilal.

He says, one of the most important aspects of his restaurant is the tehzeeb (etiquette). “We never return a customer without serving them. There are several madrasas for the poor near our restaurant. My grandfather Haji Abdul Raheem had written two points in his will — one was that we must always serve the poor and, second, that we will never ever compromise on the quality of the food. We are doing everything to follow his orders and hence, did not open a single branch,” says Bilal with a smile, while he returns change to 14-year-old Owais, who studies at the Furqania madrasa next to the Tehseen mosque.

The madrasa student says he comes to the restaurant almost every second day. “I get my own tiffin box and get one kulcha and some nihari for Rs 20,” says Owais, who belongs to neighbouring Barabanki district and stays at the residential madrasa.

The mutton nihari and two kulchas are priced at Rs 148, while the buffalo nihari and two kulchas for Rs 83. The paaya nihari, both mutton and buffalo, comes for an additional Rs 20. In between serving the evening crowd karara (crispy) kulchas, Habib Ahmad (62), who has been working at Raheem’s for the last 45 years, says, “The paaya nihari is mostly made with meat from the calf area.” The restaurant also sells mutton biryani for Rs 300 with four “big” pieces of mutton. Another bestseller is pasanda. A plate of nihari and two kulchas used to be sold at Rs 1.40 in the early 1980s when Habib started working there.

Bilal says, till date, the restaurant buys raw spices and uses them only after getting them cleaned and ground. “Our nihari has around 95 types of spices. We put them in a potli (bundle) and drop them into the nihari when the cooking starts. The recipe was given to us by our father, who got it from his grandfather Haji Raheem sahab,” says the co-owner. The meat used to make the nihari is bought daily. No artificial ingredients are used, and “it is only cooked in a copper deg (cauldron) with kalai (a layer of tin) on the outside. The kalai is a must for slow cooking. It doesn’t let the food burn,” he says, with a wry smile, before adding, “I can’t tell you what our spices are.”

Waiting for their “wholesome meal” at the restaurant are childhood friends — Umar Raza (44) and Azam Hussain (42) — both tailors. but Raza is getting annoyed by the delay, their order — two plates of steaming hot paaya nihari with a sprinkling of green coriander and chilli on top and one kulcha each — finally arrives and they start guzzling the food. They say they have been coming together to the restaurant for the past 15 years. “It is a filling meal which is the secret to our great health,” says Hussain, pointing to Raza’s bulging tummy.

Bilal says, people from “far-off” places come during Ramzan, when the restaurant remains open from iftar (meal eaten to break the fast) to sehri (pre-dawn meal before the fast). “Ramzan is when Lucknow and Chowk has the highest number of visitors. All the tables are occupied through the evening and nights,” says Bilal, adding that the next generation will continue to serve the food the way it has been served for almost a hundred years.

November 25, 2021

Prateek Hira hosts Thai Delegation

Filed under: News — admins @ 11:22 am

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/lucknow/ficci-discusses-indo-thai-biz-ties/articleshow/87877036.cms

The UP State Council of FICCI organised a programme to host minister counsellor (commercial affairs), royal Thai embassy, and hold an extensive discussion on bilateral trade, export-import and Indo-Thailand business opportunity.

Saithong Soiphet, director of Thai Trade Centre, New Delhi, an overseas office of the Department of International Trade Promotion (DITP) under the Ministry of Commerce of Thailand, spoke about the cultural connect between India and Thailand and how the two countries go back in age of Buddhism and the Ramayana.

Chairman, tourism-sub committee, FICCI, Prateek Hira spoke about the tourism potential of Thailand and UP. “To encourage Thai companies to invest in UP, FICCI must host a virtual webinar initially and invite progressive exporters and sector-specific entrepreneurs to meet with the industry base in Thailand and discuss opportunity areas,” he said.

Sarvesh Goyal, representing the construction sector, enquired about best practices and environment-friendly construction practices from the Thai representatives.

Assistant director, FICCI UP State Council, Divjot Singh Anand spoke about UP’s strengths and business-friendly policies in various sectors. He also spoke about various statistics that make UP the best investment destination.

Hassan Yakoob, who represented e-commerce sector, said like ODOP in UP, there was the concept of OTOP in Thailand.


Report in Hindustan Times….

Mr. Prateek Hira being honoured by Thai Embassy Delegation

November 17, 2021

Ayodhya Tour for Govt of Uttar Pradesh Curated by Tornos on Deepotsav

Filed under: News — admins @ 5:42 am

Travel Trade Journal (November 2021 issue) covers Ayodhya Deepotsav Familiarization tour hosted by Government of Uttar Pradesh in travelogue style :  https://online.fliphtml5.com/opbnh/qnro/

Quote by Prateek Hira (President & CEO – Tornos)

“Tornos was delighted to curate this familiarisation tour of Ayodhya for the Government of Uttar Pradesh on the occasion of Deepotsav and run it quite closely on the lines of what it offers to its guests in Ayodhya including the welcome chants by children of gurukul and privileged access to the temples. Having our industry colleagues over and being able to serve them on this tour was a blessing of sorts in itself and what better way to send out a message that we are in Ayodhya too and in a big way,” 

 

Tornos Curates Ayodhya Familiarization Tour on Deepotsav

Filed under: News — admins @ 5:35 am

Travel Newsy Reports : https://travelnewsy.com/2021/11/10/with-mega-development-projects-underway-ayodhya-preparing-to-evolve-as-a-major-tourism-destination/

With the construction of Ram Temple and UP governments mega-development plans, Ayodhya is well on its track to be developed as a Vedic and cultural heritage city.

Also known as Ram Janam Bhoomi, the city has been hosting pilgrims for centuries, however, with the state government’s renewed efforts to bring it to the world map for tourism, it is seeing increased interest not just within India, but from all around the world.

The recently organised Deepotsav was attended by Ambassadors of Kenya, Vietnam and Trinidad and Tobago.

On this occasion, the Tourism department of Uttar Pradesh invited 50 prominent tour operators, travel writers and bloggers from all over India on a familiarisation tour of the city. The group visited Kanak BhavanHanumangarhiRam Janam Bhoomi, and Saryu Ghaat to experience the city first hand.

In his interaction with media, Mr Mukesh Kumar Meshram (I.A.S.), Principal Secretary, Department of Tourism, said that in addition to the infrastructure development projects such as luxury hotels, well-connected roads, river cruise and caravans etc.. the state government is also working on projects like setting up of “Ayodhya Research Institute”, developing “Cultural Centres” to promote and generate employment for regional folk artists, “Development of Riverfront” and “Planting of Trees” that find a mention in Ramayan.

Elaborating on the programme, “Discover Your Roots” he mentioned that under this programme, we welcome people from all over the world who have their roots in India. They can visit the state, and authorities will track their records and assist them in locating their villages or homes where their forefathers had once lived before migrating to different parts of the world. 

He also shared that there are plans to develop a world-class theme park inspired by Ramayana and its characters.

Prateek Hira, CEO Tornos, said that although there is a lot of hype created with the building of Ram Temple, Ayodhya has always been a  tourists destination. People visit the city with a lot of devotion. The city has great potential, with places like  Maharishi Patanjali’s Birthplace Gonda which is not far from the city, and the presence of  Swaminath Temple in Chhapaiya, Birthplace of Swaminarayan, Guru Nanak also is believed to have visited Ayodhya. The city also has a famous Mazaar.

Ravi GosainVice president of the Indian Association of Tour Operators said “We have been promoting Ayodhya for a long time now, Once the quality infrastructure is ready, the city will start getting more tourists from all over the world.  It is important that the charm of the old city is maintained. Any old shops, houses & structures must be retained in their original form, that’s what tourists would love to experience”.

November 16, 2021

Prateek Hira’s Comments on Ayodhya in Times of India

Filed under: News — admins @ 5:46 am

Times of India News Ayodhya

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/lucknow/hotels-better-connectivity-will-propel-ayodhya-tourism/articleshow/87496360.cms

Neha Lalchandani reports / TNN / Nov 3, 2021 Lucknow:

The construction of the Ram Temple has generated immense interest in the ancient city of Ayodhya but it may take a few years before it joins the league of heritage and spiritual destinations like Varanasi, Prayagraj and Mathura. Tour operators visiting the city at the behest of the state government ahead of the Deepotsav have pointed out that the development of hotels, better connectivity, regulated temple visits and sanitation are crucial in propelling Ayodhya as a city of repute on the tourism map.

On Tuesday, a team of 40 tour operators and travel bloggers visited Hanumangarhi, Ramjanmabhoomi, Kanak Bhawan and Saryu Ghat to get a sense of what Ayodhya has to offer to tourists. The state government has elaborate plans of developing the city as a major tourist attraction.

“We have already been promoting the sector among tourists for a while now. Till now it was a city for pilgrims and devotees but now tourists also want to visit. However, it is important to retain the old world charm of the city. Old structures should not be demolished to modernise the city. People don’t want to just visit the temple but also experience the old world charm, the local culture, its people,” said Ravi Gosain, the vice-president of the Indian Association of Tour Operators.
RK Arora of Sona Travels in Delhi said that several more hotels were needed in the area, since people had to otherwise stay in Lucknow and travel 2.5 hours to visit Ayodhya. Proposing that Ayodhya should be made into a two-night destination, Arora said that a sector incorporating Lucknow, Ayodhya, Varanasi and Prayagraj should be developed, especially as Varanasi and Prayagraj are also linked to Khajuraho.

Relating how a lot of queries regarding Ayodhya had started pouring in from south India, from where a massive number of donations have also come for the construction of the temple, Ramananda of Hammock Leisure Holidays from Bengaluru said that it did not matter to people that the Ram Temple was still under construction as they believe in the sanctity of the city. Manoj Matta of Oriental Vacations and Journeys Pvt Ltd said that stepping foot in the Ramjanmabhoomi was more important than actually seeing the temple since there were several temples already present in the city.

Prateek Hira, CEO of Tornos, said that Ayodhya has always been a tourist destination and not dependent on the Ram Temple. A festival is celebrated in the city, he said, 365 days of the year. “Now because of the hype around the temple, even normal tourists and not just devotees are getting attracted to it. There is massive scope around here like the presence of Chhaapia, the birthplace of Swami Narayanan of the Swaminath Temple, which is 40km away. Patanjali was born in neighbouring Gonda. There is a famous mazaar here and Guru Nanak is believed to have visited Ayodhya. Swami Vivekanand has also stayed here,” he said.

October 17, 2021

Baghs of Lucknow

Filed under: Lucknowledge — admins @ 7:47 am

Ever wondered how there seem to be no end to the baghs in Lucknow? We bring to you the untold stories behind some of the city’s landmarks.

Wander through the streets of Lucknow and you are bound to find a number of areas with a suffix bagh meaning garden, attached to its name. Though the suffix may have no relevance today but there was a time when the city of nawabs was known to be home to no less than 400 such royal gardens.

Says city based historian Anwer Abbas, “In those days huge gardens and orchards dotted the city’s landscape. It was customary to name areas by flora that grew there.

For example Martinpurva used to be known as Lakhpeda as it had more than a lakh trees of guava and mango. Similarly, Hussainabad area was formerly called Jamuniya Bagh as this area was covered with jamun trees.”

Avers Yogesh Praveen, another historian, “Lucknow was called the city of palaces and gardens. A number of these localities were erstwhile residential colonies for the royalty, with kothis and huge gardens.

Once stripped of their titles it became difficult for the nawabs to maintain such huge gardens, so most sold them off. But the names remained.”

SECUNDER BAGH: Nawab Wajid Ali Shah fell in love with a lady named Secunder Begum but married her only when she was on her death bed, suffering from an incurable disease. He constructed a palace, a masjid and garden pavilion for the begum in the area which is now with the National Botanical Research Institute. The garden extended till the Gomti banks and was called Secunder Bagh.

MUSA BAGH: Huge gardens laid by Nawab Asaf-ud-Daulah existed in this area located near Hardoi road. Legend says that the nawab killed a rat (mushik) here hence the name. Some also believe it took its name from a French word Monsieur during Lord Martin’s period.

ALAM BAGH: This garden was named after Alam Ara, the first wife of Nawab Wajid Ali Shah. The young couple harboured a love for ghazals, and used to compose couplets sitting in these gardens.

CHAR BAGH: The area got its name from the four huge Mughal style gardens here during the time of Nawab Asaf-ud-Daulah. A garden called Bagh Sher Jung named after his uncle Sher Jung, Governor of Kashmir, existed where the city station stands now, built along with Buland Bagh laid near Rakabgunj.

KAISER BAGH: Set up by Nawab Wajid Ali Shah, it was a huge complex with small gardens dotting the area. It got its name from Urdu word qaiser meaning king, hence Qaiser’s Bagh.” Another story goes that the nawab was besotted with a beautiful lady, who was referred to as qaiser pasand (the king’s choice). He laid the garden for her and called it Kaiserbagh.

BADSHAH BAGH: Laid by Nawab Naseer-ud-Din Haider for his wife Kudsia Begum, it was a ladies garden, where even the gardeners were all women. The nawab visited this garden on a steamer which cruised from Chatr Manzil (CDRI) to Badshahbagh (Near Kailash Hostel). It was the badshah’s garden hence its name.

VILAYATI BAGH: Historians believe this garden, situated near Dilkusha gardens in present day cantonement area, got its name because of the two foreign wives, one of whom was a Christian and another, an Armenian (vilayati begums) of Nawab Ghazi-Ud-Din Haider. According to another story, the varieties of flower planted here were of foreign origin, hence the moniker Vilayati Bagh.

October 6, 2021

Cancellation & Alteration Policy

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It is very unfortunate that a tour has to be cancelled, of course there are reasons beyond your control that force you to do it. At Tornos we have a very cooperative cancellation policy. If you wish to alter your programme after the booking has been accepted, it must be communicated to us in writing and it will be subject to additional costs or service alteration fee as decided based on the change in the  programme. The cost will be informed in advance by Tornos, when requested.

While we cannot guarantee it, we will endeavour to do our best to assist with any such requests. Where it is possible to assist, the original arrangements may attract cancellation which will need to be settled by you. The new arrangements may additionally attract a recalculation of the price.

Any requests for alteration, once the tour has begun, will be treated sympathetically but we cannot guarantee their implementation. Any costs incurred in making such alterations, by us or our agents/service providers, will be passed on to you and the un-utilised portion of the holiday will attract 100% cancellation charges.

Should you wish to cancel your tour, you must notify Tornos in writing stating the reasons for cancellation. In such cases you may be covered by your insurance policy (we recommend you cover yourself with a comprehensive travel insurance well in advance). Such cancellation will deem to take place only on the date of receipt of your written request and will attract the following cancellation charges:                         

Date of receipt of cancellation  Cancellation Charge
71 days or more before departure The deposit amount and any advances paid are refunded in full, except for cancellation fee that are levied on any air-ticket and rail tickets that may have been booked before this date (and we will give you a proof of the same). Otherwise no cancellation charges are applied at this stage except for foreign exchange devaluation and bank charges that are deducted by credit card payment collection company – This is usually not more than 3.5% of the amount collected online or through inter-bank transfers. Difference in rate of exchange in foreign currency conversion is calculated as on date of refund initiation and is  passed on to the customer.    
42-70 days before departure 40% of Tour Cost. 60% is Refunded.
28 – 41 days before departure 60% of Tour Cost. 40% is Refunded.
15 – 27 days before departure 90% of Tour Cost. 10% is Refunded.
14 days or less before departure 100% of Tour Cost – Treated As No Show.

If you curtail your holiday for any reason whatsoever, we will not be able to refund the unused portion of your arrangements. Depending on the circumstances of your early return, your travel insurance may offer cover and we suggest that you seek redress with them directly. 

September 17, 2021

Things you hear when you tell someone you are from Lucknow.

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I belong to Lucknow. Thats where I have spent most of my childhood. I did my school and college from Lucknow. I stepped out of Lucknow to persue my career in technology. When I joined work there were people from all over India. After a badinage you often end up asking the other person “Where are you from ?” I have faced this question too and I have had a variety of responses to my answer which is “Lucknow”.

Things you hear when you tell someone you are from Lucknow:

  • Lucknow mein “MAIN” nahi “HUM” kehte hai, hai na ? : This is most common thing that you would hear the moment you tell that you are from Lucknow. Till the time I was in Lucknow I never realised this but this is true, we do say “HUM”instead of “MAIN”. Coming from the city of tameez and tehzeeb it came from within we never really worked towards speaking “HUM” in place of “MAIN”.
  • Lucknow ka chicken toh bahut famous hai : After empahasizing on your choice of words they would straight jump to the craftsmanship of Lucknow. When I say chicken I meant Lucknow’s famous embriodery not the edible chicken. Initiallly I used to think what is this fuzz all about. I have grown up seeing chicken all aruond me so it wasn’t a big deal for me but now I realise the beauty of it. If you are from Lucknow you must have definitely bought chicken clothings for your friends atleast once in your lifetime. If you haven’t yet, you will soon.
  • Tum toh Tunde mein roz khati hogi: Lucknow is the undisputed king of kebabs and Tunde has a reputation worth bragging. Being a vegetrian I have never had a kabab from Tunde. Yes go ahead Judge me. But I still know it must be sumptuous and mouthwatering courtsey all my non vegetarian friends and their love for Tunde. It has happened time and again that I have been asked to get Kebabas from Tunde but so far nobody has been that privileged.
  • Mayawati has made a Marine Drive in Lucknow, is it true ?: There is huge transformation done by Mayawati near the Gomti Nagar area. It has been very artistically desgined and it’s beauty is worth watching for hours. You would happily visit this place almost everyday. Nowadays it has become a popular destination for photography. So the answer is “Yes” we do have a Marine Drive in Lucknow.

If you are from Lucknow I am sure you must have heard at least one of the above from your friends or colleagues. Say yay if you have. I am sure you must have smiled reading this post. Do comment if I have missed anything which is worth mentioning here. Would love to hear your views on this, so drop your comments below.

January 21, 2020

‘Prasad’ – Ayodhya Dining Experience

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– by appointment

A meal often narrates a lot about the society, its beliefs and the people. In Ayodhya temple culture is most prominent and life revolves around it. Lunch in Ayodhya every afternoon begins with a ‘Bhog’ – offering to the deity with prayers being recited for health and wellbeing and then the distribution of ‘Prasad’, where guests are seated on the floor and a hearty meal which consists of a vegetarian fare without onion and garlic is served on dry leaf (pattal).

Tornos guests can experience this Temple Lunch at a 150 year old temple with the head priest, ‘Mahant’ and his family in Ayodhya. After this blessed lunch the Mahant will engage in conversation with the guest sharing not only some intricate facts about Ayodhya’s ethos but also his interpretation of an episode from the holy Ramayana.

 

Cost :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Starting Time :

Winters / Summers – 1 pm (Lunch) – time flexible 

Expected Duration :

1 – 2 hours

Remarks :

This is an exclusive and privileged temple dining experience at a temple that operates every day by appointment and pre-booking.

Live dance / Bhajan (devotional songs) performance is at a supplement and not a part of general product (Add half an hour extra if this activity has to be included)

This activity is in a temple thus maintaining decorum and basic religious etiquette is of utmost importance.   

January 20, 2020

Delhi Mutiny Tour

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Revisiting Delhi of 1857

Delhi the capital of the Mughal Empire, was reduced to insignificance over the preceding century. The 82-year old Mughal Monarch Bahadur Shah II (Bahadur Shah Zafar) became the frail figurehead under which Indian rebel forces rallied.

Delhi was taken by Indian rebel troops in May 1857. From June to September 1857, British troops (with reinforcements from the Sikh, Gorkha, Pathan and other regiments) laid siege to Delhi and in a series of attacks, finally won back the city. On September 20th, Bahadur Shah surrendered. The very next day, Bahadur Shah’s sons and grandson were shot by Major Hodson, and the city was declared to be recaptured by the British East India Company. Brigadier John Nicholson, who played a leading role in the siege of Delhi, died of his wounds on September 22nd, one day after taking over of Delhi. Rudyard Kipling has immortalised his death in his famous work, ‘Kim’.

After the fall of Delhi, the Mutiny lost its leadership and broke up into disparate uprisings. It took the British nearly a year of fighting to subdue the uprisings and establish control. This was followed by a horrific programme of purges that became known as the “Devil’s Wind”. Thousands were executed without trial, including an entire village population, to ensure that the Mutiny would not be repeated. Finally in 1858, the East India Company was formally dissolved and its power over India was transferred to the Crown – the beginning of the Raj.

We take you on a very well-researched structural tour of Delhi visiting the places that were under siege and the ones that saw the horrific incidents finally leading to the recapture of the walled city of Delhi. On this exhaustive tour we visit : St James Church,  Nicholson’s Cemetery,  The Telegraph Memorial, Kashmere Gate,  The Mutiny Memorial,  Flagstaff Tower, The Magazine, The Khooni Darwaza (Bloody Gate). This tour is led by a Mutiny Specialist Guide and is a special interest subject based tour. 

Cost :

INR 8500 per person (min 2 guests required)

Starting Time : 

Winters / Summers – 8 am – 9 am

Expected Duration : 

5 hours (Extensive tour)

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive special interest tour that operates every day, except Monday . Ideal time of starting would be 0800 hrs, though may be altered as per individual requirements, while expect to return to the hotel by 1400 / 1500 hrs.

Does not operate on Monday and national holidays.

January 15, 2020

Payments

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This is a highly secured payment page to accept payments online powered by Razorpay. You may pay here by entering your card details and a bit of reference, enabling us to track this payment at our end.

After clicking on “Pay TORNOS Now” button below you will be redirected to highly secured third-party payment page to complete your payment process (This is for cards issued in India).

Apart from the Credit/Debit Cards, we have quite a few other options to receive payments as well. We can be paid for our Tours and Travel Related Services through Inter-Bank Transfers, International SWIFT Transfers (details on request: info@tornosindia.com) and even through Mobile Payment Apps such as Paytm, AmazonPay, GooglePay, PhonePe etc. Mobile Payment details on request (Our third party mobile payment app carrier apart from RazorPay is Paytm).

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http://www.tornosindia.com/cancellation-alteration-policy/
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January 11, 2020

Death & Beyond (Varanasi Walk)

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Varanasi or Banaras is the oldest living city world over. This is a city where Lord Shiva dwelled and made it his abode. There may be many cities where people migrate to live, but this is the only city where people are known to migrate to die. In Hinduism it is strongly believed that death or cremation in Varanasi surely opens the doors to heaven, no wonder this is a city that celebrates death and truly understands that death is yet another journey into another world and only a cycle of rebirth.

On this walking tour we take you to understand death and all the rituals that follow it from the time of cremation, through the mourning and finally ending the 13 day period of mourning and even thereafter the annual ritual performed in the memory of the dead. Mind you each ritual is with a purpose and has a scientific backing to it. Once you have understood the ‘Death in Varanasi’ the life becomes so easy and meaningful.

An expert walk leader accompanies you detailing each step and answering many of your existential questions. You also get an opportunity to interact with a ‘Dome’ (A community that is entrusted with organizing and helping the family to light the funeral pyre).

This may sound a scary walking tour but if we consider this as a truth of life and understand the rituals it surely is a learning experience.

 

Cost :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Starting Time :

11 am (Flexible)

Expected Duration :

2 – 2.5 hours 

Remarks :

This is a ritual understanding walking tour and a learning experience. Some times the visuals of burning funeral pyres may not be pleasant and surely not for children below the age of 16. 

Does not operate on a few festivals such as Holi &  Diwali. 

Threads of Banaras (Silk Weaving Walk)

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Varanasi previously known as Banaras (also spelt as Benaras), has been a centre of production of hand-loom silk since centuries. Varanasi silk fabrics have been eulogised in scriptures and ancient texts and India’s traditional wedding trousseau is incomplete without a Banarasi Saree. The artistic ingenuity of the artisans and the changing market trends have resulted in a great variety of the Banaras silk fabrics. No two sarees are the similar in quality, colour, design or pattern. Further reading https://edition.cnn.com/style/article/silk-weavers-varanasi-banarasi-sari-intl-hnk/index.html

Varanasi one of the most ancient cities, abode of Lord Shiva – known for its ghats and temples produces the most exquisite silk sarees called ‘Banarasi’ with intricate motifs and gold and silver metal threads. An Indian woman’s wardrobe is said to be incomplete without having at least one of these and these are considered an Indian wedding essential for the bride.  

On this three hours tour led by an expert we give you an interactive experience, walking through the weavers’ loom village that was got a new lease of life after it was patronized by the leading luxury hotel chain – The Taj Group of Hotels’ which adopted it and since, the looms at this weavers village were back in action, producing hand-crafted silk sarees as uniforms for their lady executives, all through their properties in India and abroad.

This walk gives an opportunity to understand and appreciate the craft, meet the weavers’ families to get the first hand information about their socio-economic condition and the evolution of trade from the olden times to the modern ones. This tour is an opportunity to see the hand-looms and understand the dynamics of weaving, sourcing and types of silk being used. On this tour you also visit a weaver’s family and enjoy a cup of tea with him over an interactive session and possibly try your hands on one of the silk piece on the loom.  

 

Cost :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Starting Time :

11 am (Flexible)

Expected Duration :

3 – 3.5 hours 

Remarks :

This is a craft appreciation walking tour and often a learning experience (hands-on) of silk weaving looms in Varanasi for special interest groups.

The workshop is held at a weavers studio/home. 

Does not operate on a few festivals such as Holi, Diwali, Eid & Mohorram. After Ramzan this walking tour remains suspended for 15 days.  

Bells, Beats & Ballet – Kathak Workshop

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Kathak is one of the eight classical dance forms of India. Its famous three ‘gharanas’ or the schools are Lucknow, Jaipur and Banaras, where Lucknow is considered to be the most superior of these all, due to its distinctive style that includes intricate hand, foot and eye movement and above all, intense facial expressions that make the story come alive. From love stories of Lord Krishna, to description of Lord Shiva’s personality, from entertainment evenings at the royal courts of Mughals and the Nawabs of Awadh or for that matter a devotee’s love for God as part of Sufi belief, Kathak is about visually narrating a story through a dance. Kathak dance form is in fact the most secular of all dance forms in India, living up to Hindu-Muslim unity, in line with secular principles of Awadh, particularly that of Lucknow, which is a part of its social fabric.

Under our product, ‘Bells, Beats and Ballet’ – (Kathak Workshop), we at Tornos bring to you 3 exciting options to choose from:-

Cost :

I – Watch Kathak Students Learn : INR 2500 Per Guest

(Includes : A visit to a Kathak school to watch students learn and perform, also  a 15 min lecture by a Kathak teacher for better connect. Also includes soft-drinks and light refreshments. Duration is about one and a half  hour) 

IA – Learning and Appreciation Kathak Session : INR 4700 Per Guest

(Includes : A visit to a Kathak school to learn and appreciate the dance form in a two and a half hour session under expert teachers along with other students. A bit of hands-on fun-class too. Also includes soft-drinks and light refreshments)

IB – Intensive Understanding of Kathak : INR 12000 Per Guest

(Includes : Two days of five hours each a day rigorous Kathak learning sessions along with tea/soft-drinks and light refreshments)

Starting Time & Duration : 

This experience is available every day except on Sunday, National and Festive holidays. First two options:‘I’ and ‘IA’ are available at 1800 hrs, while option ‘IB’ is available to be opted as a post-breakfast or as a post-lunch session.

Remarks : 

Venue in the above mentioned package is a ‘Kathak Training School’ and visits are with special arrangements and prior permissions. Should there be a requirement of any other venue, such as a hotel banquet etc., there would be an additional charge for that. Venue cost, other than a Kathak School on request.

 

Ayodhya Darshan (Ex Lucknow)

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(Same day shared, no-frills group tour from Lucknow to Ayodhya. 09-10 hours, including driving time & temple visits)

Post breakfast at 0900 hrs you will be picked up from city hotels (except from Ramada. Pre-booking is important Call 24X7 : + 91-9935538105) and we will leave Lucknow for Ayodhya (150 km / 2 hrs). En route a bio-break at an identified facility. 

Upon arrival we will be met by our Ayodhya Tour Manager who will now lead the tour and get us a privileged access into the temples.

We will visit Ram Janam Bhoomi, the place of birth of Lord Rama. 

Later we will break for lunch at a temple eatery (Optional Lunch/Refreshments on your own – it is not covered in the cost)

Thereafter we will visit Hanuman Gari – the seat of Lord Hanuman who sits on a hilltop to guard the holy city of Ayodhya.

We will now visit Kanak Bhawan and then visit of Kaale Ram Temple and Nageshwar Nath Temple and the Saryu Ghat. (Optional boating on the river – it is not covered in the cost)

Later we drive to the temple workshop where stones are being carved to be placed in the under-construction Rama Temple. 

We will now board our vehicle and return to Lucknow, to reach Lucknow by late dinner time. (Drop-off at hotels from where guests were picked up).

Cost :

INR 3,000 per person  – SPECIAL PRICE (Limited Offer)

Starting Time : 

*09:00 – 10:00 am (will change depending on hotel. It will collect guests from different hotels)

Expected Duration : 

09-10 hours

Remarks : 

This is a shared group tour.

*Pickup time from city hotels.  Exact time will be communicated to you a day (12 hrs) prior 

Expect to return by dinner to Lucknow.

 

Experiences