Kite Flying in Lucknow

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JAMGHAT – a festival of kite-flying in Lucknow

Volume: 5, No: 10 ; October-2011

( Kite Flying is a favourite pass-time for Lucknowites, specially in the older part of the city. This pass-time is full-time for many in Lucknow, who spend the major part of their days on their rooftop or the banks of river Gomti fighting undeclared match of kite-flying in the Lucknow skies. One particular day in a year is dedicated to kite-flying, a day when no mother scolds her children for not studding and just flying kites from dawn to dusk. Great preparations are on for this festival that falls every year, the very next day of Diwali and binds all religions, casts and communities together in the skies. TORNOS has an exclusive product based on Kite Flying, ‘Kankave Baazi’ – We arrange exclusive event for visiting groups and FITs. Read More: >http://www.tornosindia.com/kite-flying )

Hundreds of kites resembling butterflies, dragons, fish and birds Thursday fluttered in the Lucknow sky, particularly in the old city where Hindus, Muslims and others come together to celebrate the festival of Jamghat, that falls the very next day of Diwali.

“For those of us in Old Lucknow, Jamghat is a festival that helps maintain social relationships,” Assad Ahmad, 64, a kite enthusiast and retired government employee in Aminabad locality, tells. “The festival in a true sense reflects communal harmony as Hindus and Muslims come together to fly kites and exchange sweets,” he adds.

In several localities, including Hussainganj, Batashey-wali-gali, Chaupatiya, Chowk, Daliganj and on the banks of river Gomti, kite enthusiasts form teams and challenge each other to showcase their prowess and supremacy in the battle that is fought in the skies of Lucknow. Besides the traditional kites, people have now started opting for the Chinese kites because of their attraction quotient. However, professionals still prefer the local handmade ones to their imported contemporary.

Chinese kites are mainly made of plastic sheets whereas the local ones are made of thin paper. Chinese kites require windy conditions to soar in the skies, where as the local ones can be maneuvered in almost all conditions.

According to a popular belief, Jamghat started off as a hobby when Lucknow was ruled by the Nawabs almost two centuries ago. Now It has become a tradition that has a large number of followers of different age groups and from all religions. It is also said that that Hiuen Tsang and Fa Hein brought the tradition of kite flying to India, when they came in 4th and 7th century respectively.

Nawab Asaf-ud-daulah is believed to have developed an intense interest in kites due to his uncle Ustad Aga Abu Turrab Khan. With patronage from the Nawab, the pass-time soon became popular among the masses. Amjad Ali Shah is believed to have changed the basic design of kite from two shoulders to just one.

LOCAL KITE FLYING ACCESSORIES & LINGO EXPLAINED AS UNDER :-

TADDHA: the spine of a kite.

KANG: Shoulders of a kite or the bamboo stick that runs across the kite.

KANKAWWA: Kite made from full sheet of a paper with shape like wings of a bird. This form of kite owes its origin to the Nawabs of Avadh.

PAUNTAVA: Kite made from 3/4 part of a sheet and is the most popular form of kite preferred by experts.

PAUNTAI: Kite made from paper left from a pauntava.

ADDHI: Two kites made from a single sheet.

SAVA KA TEEN: Three kites made from 3/4 parts of a sheet.

CHICHI: Small kite with a spine of about 6-8 inches.

KANNE: An arrangement of cords tied on the spine of the kite that are connected to the main cord.

SADDI: The cotton cord, usually white, used to fly a kite.

MANJHA: a sharp cord tied ahead of the saddi used to cut the kite of opponents.

CHARKI / PHIRKI: A spindle used to keep saddi or manjha.

Kite Flying


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JAMGHAT – a festival of kite-flying in Lucknow

( Kite Flying is a favourite pass-time for Lucknowites, specially in the older part of the city. This pass-time is full-time for many in Lucknow, who spend the major part of their days on their rooftop or the banks of river Gomti fighting undeclared match of kite-flying in the Lucknow skies. One particular day in a year is dedicated to kite-flying, a day when no mother scolds her children for not studding and just flying kites from dawn to dusk. Great preparations are on for this festival that falls every year, the very next day of Diwali and binds all religions, casts and communities together in the skies. TORNOS has an exclusive product based on Kite Flying, ‘Kankave Baazi’ – We arrange exclusive event for visiting groups and FITs. Read More: >http://www.tornosindia.com/kite-flying )

Hundreds of kites resembling butterflies, dragons, fish and birds Thursday fluttered in the Lucknow sky, particularly in the old city where Hindus, Muslims and others come together to celebrate the festival of Jamghat, that falls the very next day of Diwali.

“For those of us in Old Lucknow, Jamghat is a festival that helps maintain social relationships,” Assad Ahmad, 64, a kite enthusiast and retired government employee in Aminabad locality, tells. “The festival in a true sense reflects communal harmony as Hindus and Muslims come together to fly kites and exchange sweets,” he adds.

In several localities, including Hussainganj, Batashey-wali-gali, Chaupatiya, Chowk, Daliganj and on the banks of river Gomti, kite enthusiasts form teams and challenge each other to showcase their prowess and supremacy in the battle that is fought in the skies of Lucknow. Besides the traditional kites, people have now started opting for the Chinese kites because of their attraction quotient. However, professionals still prefer the local handmade ones to their imported contemporary.

Chinese kites are mainly made of plastic sheets whereas the local ones are made of thin paper. Chinese kites require windy conditions to soar in the skies, where as the local ones can be maneuvered in almost all conditions.

According to a popular belief, Jamghat started off as a hobby when Lucknow was ruled by the Nawabs almost two centuries ago. Now It has become a tradition that has a large number of followers of different age groups and from all religions. It is also said that that Hiuen Tsang and Fa Hein brought the tradition of kite flying to India, when they came in 4th and 7th century respectively.

Nawab Asaf-ud-daulah is believed to have developed an intense interest in kites due to his uncle Ustad Aga Abu Turrab Khan. With patronage from the Nawab, the pass-time soon became popular among the masses. Amjad Ali Shah is believed to have changed the basic design of kite from two shoulders to just one.

LOCAL KITE FLYING ACCESSORIES & LINGO EXPLAINED AS UNDER :-

TADDHA: the spine of a kite.

KANG: Shoulders of a kite or the bamboo stick that runs across the kite.

KANKAWWA: Kite made from full sheet of a paper with shape like wings of a bird. This form of kite owes its origin to the Nawabs of Avadh.

PAUNTAVA: Kite made from 3/4 part of a sheet and is the most popular form of kite preferred by experts.

PAUNTAI: Kite made from paper left from a pauntava.

ADDHI: Two kites made from a single sheet.

SAVA KA TEEN: Three kites made from 3/4 parts of a sheet.

CHICHI: Small kite with a spine of about 6-8 inches.

KANNE: An arrangement of cords tied on the spine of the kite that are connected to the main cord.

SADDI: The cotton cord, usually white, used to fly a kite.

MANJHA: a sharp cord tied ahead of the saddi used to cut the kite of opponents.

CHARKI / PHIRKI: A spindle used to keep saddi or manjha.

Kite Flying



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