Kebabs on the Culinary Walk by Tornos

January 28, 2020

Evening Culinary Walk

Filed under: Home Product Box,Walks — Tornos @ 9:03 am

Lucknow as a city has carved a niche by attracting gastronomes, for the want of discovering and re-discovering the Awadhi Cuisine. Till date Lucknowites spend the most of their earnings and time on their kitchens. Lucknow is one place that has a full colony of chefs called, ‘Bawarchi Tola’ and then there is a full street, where one can find the best from Lucknow’s very own traditional kitchens.

We take you for this evening walk and make you hop-in, hop-out of the traditional roadside eateries, making you try the best that is on the menu. This is a guided tour with our own set of cutlery and basic dining essentials. It allows you to experience the best of the best, at the unpretentious eateries, without having to worry about how to eat without a fork or to wipe your hands clean after you are done.

Cost :

INR 2000 per person (Shared Walk)

INR 8000 (Up to 4 persons – Exclusive Walk)

Starting Time : 

Winters (Nov-Feb) – 7 pm

Summers (Mar-Oct) – 7:30 pm

Expected Duration : 

2 hours

Remarks : 

You got to be a foodie to appreciate this walking tour. This tour is essentially for meat eaters. To enjoy this walk, let your lunch be light as it will involve a lot of eating.

Does not operate on Thursday, Sunday and a few Islamic festivals. Also 15 days after Eid this walk remains suspended. 

January 27, 2020

Heritage Walk

Filed under: Home Product Box,Walks — Tornos @ 9:03 am

Lucknow is not just any other city, but a chapter that unfolds itself each time one visits this epicenter of culture. At Tornos we have exclusively designed a Heritage Walk, discovering the lanes and the by-lanes of Chowk. On this walking tour we explore the unexplored and explain the inexplicable. Understand how vast a history, this city of superlatives holds. History in Lucknow, stretches beyond the concrete walls of its monuments, spreads into the lanes of Lucknow and has many more nuances that can only be understood and appreciated in the lanes and by-lanes of Chowk.

Tornos has been discovering and rediscovering this city since its own inception in 1994 and every time we design or redesign our products, we stumble upon a new piece of history that we wish to share with our guests. Heritage Walk is our endeavour of sharing our discoveries and knowledge that make Lucknow look so new and fresh every time. Our expert Walk Leaders take you into the bygone era of this city that is a world unto itself.

Cost :

INR 1400 per person (Shared Walk)

INR 8400 (Up to 6 persons – Exclusive Walk)

Starting Time : 

Winters (Nov-Feb) – 4:30 pm

Summers (Mar-Oct) – 5 pm

Expected Duration : 

1.5 – 2 hours

Remarks : 

This tour covers a heritage lane and explains the culture, people and lifestyle of Lucknow within just a span of 2 hrs. No heritage monuments are a part of this walk.

Does not operate on Thursdays, National Holidays and a few festivals such as Holi, Diwali, Eid & Mohorram.

January 26, 2020

Lucknow Mutiny Tour

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 9:07 am

Revisiting Lucknow of 1857-58

Lucknow on the west of river Gomti, 42 miles east of Cawnpore and 610 miles from Calcutta, was the capital of the province of Oudh. It was annexed, in 1856, and this very fact became the root cause of the mutiny here. If the British rule were flexible and if at all it respected the local sentiments, the course of history would have been quite different. Oudh had been the nursery of the company’s infantry. Its population was armed, militarised and it provided soldiers for more than just British interests. Nawab’s extensive court and his army had been disbanded. Some 200,000 men, all the supporting services, the armourers alone numbering 12000, as well as dispossession of many landowners & talukdars of their rights & powers, happened to be the worst mistake of the British. This threw still more armed men out of employment, but skilled to fight against the perpetrators of their misery the British. While the arrival of Sir Henry Lawrence as the Chief Commissioner of Oudh in time would have been a game changer and could have made the people of Oudh fall in line with the British, but this happened late and by this time the air in Oudh was all charged up to lay an all out siege in May 1857.

On this very exclusive curated tour – ‘Revisiting Lucknow of 1857-58’, we take you through the routes followed by Henry Havelock, James Outram and Colin Campbell. We visit the areas that were in focus during the siege of Lucknow. We try and understand, how this siege progressed to a conclusive end, but not without sacrifices from both the warring fronts.

Cost :

INR 8500 per person

Starting Time : 

Winters / Summers – 8 am – 9 am

Expected Duration : 

9 hours (Extensive tour)

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive special interest tour that operates every day, except Friday. Ideal time of starting would be 0800 hrs, though may be altered as per individual requirements, while expect to return to the hotel by 1700 / 1800 hrs.

Does not operate on Friday and national holidays.

January 25, 2020

‘Beyond Kebab’ Walk

Filed under: Home Product Box,Walks — Tornos @ 9:04 am

Lucknow is one city that is home to diversity, where not only religions meet and live together in utmost harmony, but also appreciate each other’s diverse cuisines, how else would one explain the existence of heritage halwais like Netram and Madhurima alongside Tundey Kebabi and Bismillah Biryani in Lucknow. This coexistence or rather the confluence of diverse cultures and traditions is actually called ‘Ganga-Jamuni Tehzib’.

Vegetarian cuisine in Lucknow is as rich as its non-vegetarian fare and held equally in high regard for its recipes and age-old traditions. Halwais in Lucknow have had their own loyal fan list and generations have been eating there for ages and vow that nothing has changed ever since.

On this two hours walking tour we take you to the traditional eateries where the oldest dates back to 1825, show you some traditional shops that specialise in sun-dried lentil-nuggets and accompaniments like papadums, pickles, preserves, chutneys for ages and still rule the dinner tables at Lucknow homes. Taste not only the tangy chaat and the coolest kulfi on this tour but also end it with a paan (betel-leaf preparation) that is nothing short of a dessert.

Cost :

INR 2000 per person (Shared Walk)

INR 8000 (Up to 4 persons – Exclusive Walk)

Starting Time :

Winters / Summers – 1 pm

Expected Duration :

2 hours

Remarks :

You got to be a foodie to appreciate this walking tour. This tour is essentially for vegetarians and takes you to the most authentic eateries that actually invented/mastered the dishes more that 150 years ago.

To enjoy this walk, let your breakfast be lite as it will involved a lot of eating.

Does not operate on Thursday, national holidays and a few festivals. Also 6 days after the festival of Holi and for 2 days after the festival of Diwali this walk remains suspended.

January 24, 2020

Victorian Walk

Filed under: Home Product Box,Walks — Tornos @ 9:05 am

Why are we calling it a ‘Victorian Walk’ ?

The Victorian era of British history was the period of Queen Victoria’s reign from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901. It was a long period of peace, prosperity, refined sensibilities and national self-confidence for Britain. This was a period of great uprising  of 1857 that changed the way Indians and Britons lived, worked and thought. On one hand it records devastation and on another it is the period of art, literature, culture and style. Hazratganj is a place that has witnessed all of this and yet survived the strong winds that impacted its fabric, changed cultures and lifestyle yet can tell a story that starts from the early years of Queen Victoria and travels through the Edwardian into the second World War and further up till date.

It is said that change is inevitable and welcome, if it were not change, we would have never undertaken this walk to understand the transformation of Hazratgunge into Hazratganj. This is one place that so very conveniently connects history to itself, amalgamates it into the aristocracy of the British in India during the Raj and again moves up to Americanization during the World War, back into an Anglo-Indian culture and then again into a British influenced Lucknow that was very Indian at heart, but with a distinct culture.

One finds striking names and places in this road, which have an exciting story to back them and weave history around it.

About Victorian Walk…

Our Victorian Walk at HAZRATGUNGE (Hazratganj) lets you into its rich history, legacy and of course the marketplace that has evolved with times to cater the cultured and the elite of Lucknow. We take you on this walking tour, that includes a seated session to enjoy a freshly brewed Darjeeling Tea and some tea-time essentials. On this tour you will discover and rediscover Hazratganj of yore and will be able to compare it with the transformed Ganj of today. Understand the checkered history of Hazratganj from the uprising days of 1857 till the second world war in 1939-45 and again till the Indian independence in 1947. Further on, you learn about how Hazratganj plays a pivotal role in people’s life and why the people of Lucknow take pride in being seen here.

You also steel an opportunity to walk in and out of the glitzy showrooms and emporia that entice you with their colour and style. Walkers on this tour will be guided through this street by an expert walk leader, who will give ample time to look around. The commentary on this walk is through an audio guide system, helping you to listen to your walk leader, even when you are not necessarily following him.

We are sure, this is an experience that takes you back in times and lets you travel back again.

Cost :

INR 3500 per person (Shared Walk)

INR 14000 (Up to 4 persons – Exclusive Walk)

Starting Time :

Winters / Summers – 4 pm

Expected Duration :

2 hours

Remarks :

Most enjoyable for British Travellers. Check schedule with us.

Does not operate on Sunday, national holidays and a few festivals such as Holi, & Diwali.

January 23, 2020

Wajid Ali Shah Walk

Filed under: Home Product Box,Walks — Tornos @ 9:06 am

Kaiserbagh Palace was once the most beautiful palaces anywhere, with well laid landscaped gardens, gilded domes and minarets that added to the overall beauty of this huge palace complex. It indeed did not have any parallel anywhere in the world.No doubt, the palace complex was envied by outsiders and made natives proud. Kaiserbagh Palace Complex was in fact the most well planned works of grandeur by Wajid-Ali-Shah, the last ruler of Awadh, who himself was a great connoisseur of art in all its forms and the same innate personality reflected in his palace.

Kaiserbagh later became a victim of British revenge, after the failed Indian Mutiny in 1858 when the British forces recaptured sieged Lucknow, Begum Hazrat Mahal and her son Birjis Qadr fled to Nepal and Wajid-Ali-Shah was deposed and left for Calcutta. As a consequence and revenge of the toughest time that the British forces had here, Kaiserbagh was unmindfully demolished. Today sadly, only a few structures remain to be seen and it is indeed very hard to imagine that once it was, the world’s most beautiful palace complex.

On this walking tour we explore the Kaiserbagh Palace Complex, reconstruct the area with the help of old pictures and maps and as a cherry on the cake, we treat you over a cup of tea at the Kotwara House, that is a small part of Kaiserbagh, now an abode of the film maker Muzaffar Ali. We peep inside an intact portion of this palace, where along with your tea, you also enjoy watching a clip from his classic film, ‘Umrao Jaan’, that in fact was inspired by the culture of Lucknow and was extensively shot in Kaiserbagh.

Cost :

INR 3800 per person (Min two guests required)

Starting Time : 

Winters / Summers – 3 pm

Expected Duration : 

2 hours

Remarks : 

This tour covers Kaiserbagh, the erstwhile palace complex of Wajid Ali Shah, reconstructing it virtually and understanding the personality of the ruler. This walking tour ends at The Kotwara House over a cup of tea and cookies. 

Does not operate on Sunday and a few festivals such as Holi, Eid & Mohorram.

January 22, 2020

Sightseeing Tour of Lucknow

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 9:07 am

– that we call ‘sightexperiencing

Lucknow is indeed a city of many splendours, that promises a rich dose of history, culture and cuisine. It is our endeavour to show you Lucknow like no one does and pack it all in a day. At Tornos we do not call it a Sightseeing tour, but rather term it as ‘sightexperiencing’ where our expert guides tell our guests more than just the history and take you back in time when actually the monument was built or used.

We pick you up in the morning at 0900/1000 hrs from your hotel (time can be tweaked, based on personal requirements) and take you on a city tour in an exclusive car with an English speaking guide. Go around the fabled monuments that include :-

  • La Martiniere
  • Dilkusha
  • Lucknow Residency
  • Sadat Ali & Begum Tombs
  • Asfi (Bara) Imambara
  • Rumi Darwaza
  • Clock Tower
  • Satkhanda
  • Husainabad (Chota) Imambara

 

Cost :

INR 3500 per person

Starting Time :

Winters / Summers – 9 am (flexible start time though)

Expected Duration :

5-6 hours (flexible duration)

Remarks :

Min 5 hour tour, but can be altered to specific requirements. Drop off at the hotel/airport/railway station after the tour is included. (Except for Hotel Ramada).

Please check monument inclusions, as that may change from time to time, depending on what is closed on the day when this tour is being availed.

On a few days may not operate as a full tour(covering all mentioned places) due to monument closures during a few festivals.

January 21, 2020

La Martiniere Decoded

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 10:47 am

– by permission

A castle that could never be used to live, is a French imprint in Lucknow and narrates a story of how a Frenchman, Claude Martin rose to become Maj General in the British East India Company and all about his marshal deeds and charity that converted it into one of the most prestigious schools of India. This magnificent architecture stands on the banks of river Gomti and has absolutely no equal in India. Believe it or not, this is a school that received many honours, including ‘The Battle Honours’ for the defence of Residency in 1857.

We would explore La Martiniere on this curated tour and we would get a chance to enjoy tea and snacks at the school canteen or a specially arranged session at the school. On this very exclusive tour – ‘La Martiniere Decoded’, we take you on a walk through the campus of La Martiniere, visit the hidden corners to understand not only its history, but also to understand the education and administrative systems followed by the school. Decode La Martiniere with us !

Cost :

INR 5500 per person

Starting Time : 

9:30 am – 12:15 pm (*1st time slot)

2:45 pm – 5:30 pm (*2nd time slot)

Expected Duration : 

2.45 hours (consider almost 3 hours)

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive and privileged visits and operates daily.

*Visit under this is available in two slots, but timings are flexible and may be altered after prior discussion. 

January 20, 2020

Kanpur Mutiny Tour

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 8:28 am

Revisiting Cawnpore of 1857

Believed to have been settled by an ancient Hindu king, referred as Kanpur, the area was of little significance till about 1765. By the treaty of Faizabad, in 1775, the East India Company engaged to supply a brigade for the defence of the frontier of Oudh, and Cawnpore was selected as the station for the forces, with a subsidy being paid by the protected country (Oude) for the maintenance of the troops. Subsequently, in 1801 Lord Wellesley commuted this payment for the surrender of the district to the company’s territory, thus it gained an important barrier against the threatened invasion of the south, from Kabul and Afghanistan. Cawnpore immediately rose into one of the most important of the company’s garrisons.

Cawnpore Cantonment, that was quite distinct from the native city, was spread over an extent of six miles, in a semicircular form, along the banks of river Ganges. Hundreds of colonial bungalows, residences of British officers, standing midst well laid gardens, interspersed with forest trees. The barracks of the troops, with a separate bazaar for each regiment were a treat to ones eyes. The breadth of Ganges at Cawnpore, in the dry season, is about five hundred yards, but when the rains filled it up, its bed stretched more than a mile.

On this very exclusive curated tour – ‘Revisiting Cawnpore of 1857’, we take you through the areas that were the focus of the siege. We try and understand, how this bloodiest siege progressed to a conclusive end, when General Havelock freed Cawnpore of the shadows of the rebels.

Cost :

INR 8500 per person

Starting Time : 

Winters / Summers – 8 am – 9 am

Expected Duration : 

8 hours (if from/to Lucknow)  |  4 hours (if from/to Kanpur)

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive special interest tour that operates every day.

Ideal time of starting would be 0800 hrs (if from Lucknow) while 1000 hrs (if from Kanpur), though may be altered as per individual requirements, while expect to return to the hotel by 1600 / 1700 hrs if Lucknow, or by 1400 / 1500 hrs if Kanpur.

January 19, 2020

Dine with the Maharaja in Lucknow

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 12:02 pm

– by appointment

What would be a better way than to interact with Raja Amresh Kumar Singh’s family at his city palace, Khajurgaon, to understand Lucknow’s Hindu Royalty that existed even before the Nawabs came in, co-existed during the Nawabs, later with the British and exists even today amidst the changed times.

Khajoorgaon is the oldest Taluqdar estate of the erstwhile Avadh province and the family is important, as the two generations of this family have been awarded K.C.I.E by Her Majesty Queen Victoria in 1887 and by His Majesty King George-V in 1911.

This city palace in Lucknow was constructed by His Royal Highness Rana Shankar Baksh Singh in 1896 and the main building is in use by the family as their home till date. Khajurgaon Palace reflects a very strong British influence along with elements of native Avadhi architecture. It has a darbar hall with beautiful hand painted murals, in natural colours all over. In fact, this palace is the only palace with murals and patterns adorning its main room, while most of its window grills and balconies have wrought iron gold painted face-plate of Her Majesty Queen Victoria, depicting a strong Victorian influence of the British Raj on this family.

Tornos has exclusive arrangements with the family that organises this at their home, The Khajoorgaon Palace. We would be delighted to take our guests here for a lecture, meeting with Raja Sahib and his family and they are always happy to host an authentic home-cooked Awadhi dinner, cooked by Khajoorgaon family in their home kitchen. Raja Sahib and his family look after the visiting guests themselves and supervise each detail. Top it up with a Kathak Interpretation.

Click here to see a few pictures

Cost :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Starting Time :

Winters / Summers – 7 pm (Dinner) – time flexible 

Expected Duration :

2 – 2.5 hours

Remarks :

This is an exclusive and privileged family dining experience at family home (city palace) that operates every day by appointment and pre-booking.

Live dance / music performance is at a supplement and not a part of general product 

This is a royal illustrious family thus maintaining decorum and basic etiquette is of utmost importance.   

Tea at La Martiniere

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 10:04 am

La Martiniere is no less than an artistically crafted wedding cake. This building built by a Frenchman is so breathtakingly beautiful that the mere sight skips a beat in your heart. In this 18th century monument you are served tea in a perfect British style as was done during the days of Raj in Lucknow.

The setting is so British and the ambiance breathtaking, to top it all you have an option to chat with the students who study at La Martiniere College, a legacy of Maj Gen Claude Martin, that according to his will is used as an educational institution.

At Tornos we have crafted this experience of enjoying your afternoon tea at La Martiniere. Guests get to interact with an old student and admire this great architecture of yore, that has absolutely no parallel in India. Better still, opt for a more elegant form, termed as the ‘Victorian Tea Party’, an opportunity for us to bring out our most elegant collection of china and silver and to engage in friendly conversation with the guests. When the weather is cool during winters, we have our tea out in the open under the warm sun. In summers, we shift it under a shady tree or better still inside the building. As the guests sip the delicate brew and enjoy light tea-time snacks, they are told more about the founder of this school, the system of British education that is followed here and the role of La Martiniere in the mutiny of 1857.

Cost & Details :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

 

Read more about the origin and evolution of Tea Parties.

These parties were a social must among the British in India and more so in Lucknow that was the seat of the British Resident with a fairly large British and the Anglo-Indian population.

‘Afternoon Tea’ did not exist before the 19th century. At that time lunch was eaten quite early in the day and dinner wasn’t served until 8 or 9 o’clock at night. But it wasn’t until Anna, the seventh Duchess of Bedford, asked for tea and light refreshments in her room one afternoon, around 1830, that the ritual began. The Duchess enjoyed her ‘taking of tea’ so much that she started inviting her friends to join her. Before long having elegant tea parties was very fashionable. Demand for tea wares grew and soon there were tea services in silver and fine bone china, trays, cake stands, servers, tea caddies, tea strainers, teapots, and tea tables.

As times and lifestyles changed the popularity of the formal afternoon tea waned, but has seen a revival in recent years as people once again enjoy its elegance. A “Devon Cream Tea” or simply “Cream Tea” has recently been adopted where scones, with clotted cream and jam, are made the main attraction served alongside a steaming pot of tea.

Although we tend to associate dainty cucumber sandwiches and scones with afternoon tea, there is no set menu and it really depends on the time of year, the setting, and personal tastes. Sandwiches and scones are standard fare but other choices can include muffins, crumpets, bread and butter, cakes, cookies (biscuits), gingerbread, pastries, fruit, and a selection of jam and jellies, preserves, lemon curd, and clotted cream.

Taking center stage, of course, is the tea. Served from a teapot, the brewing of the tea is very important. First, rinse your teapot with warm water. Next, bring a kettle of water to boil and pour it over the tea leaves, letting it steep for three to five minutes. If using loose tea the rule is one heaping teaspoon of tea for each cup of water, plus one teaspoon “for the pot”.

At one time it was customary to first pour a little milk into the teacup. It was thought that the fine porcelain cup may crack if the hot tea was poured directly into the empty cup. Sugar was then offered in cube form, with tongs, or else granulated.

Normally the host or hostess pours the tea and serves the food. Guests can either be seated around a table or else in armchairs with an end table nearby for them to place their cup and saucer, teaspoon, plate, napkin, knife and fork.

A Bit of History…

According to a legend, tea was first discovered by Chinese Emperor Shen Nong in 2737 BC when some tea leaves floated into a pot of boiling water. It wasn’t until the mid-1600s, however, that tea finally reached England. Due to its sale being controlled by trade monopolies, and that it had to be imported from China via boat traveling around the Cape of Africa and then north to England, it was a rather costly commodity.

The first known record of tea being imported into England was the charter granted by Elizabeth I to The East India Company. This document recorded ships reaching England in 1637, but dealings with Chinese merchants did not appear until 1644.

The first merchant to sell tea was Thomas Garway who offered it in both a dry and liquid form at his coffeehouse in Exchange Alley in London. The popularity of the coffee house grew quickly and there were more than 500 in London by 1700. By the middle of the 18th century, tea replaced ale and gin as the nation’s drink. As with most customs in England, when having tea became an accepted practice of the Royals, it then spread down to the working classes.

Types of Tea Parties…

As supper normally was served at 8:00 or 9:00 p.m., having tea that was served along with light sandwiches and broths in late afternoon, helped ward off hunger until then. Two types of teas developed, one called a High Tea and the other called a Low Tea. The one most commonly served by the wealthy was called a Low Tea and revolved more on its presentation and conversation. The working classes would celebrate a High Tea, which was more of a meal including meats and vegetables as well as tea, cookies and fruits.

Is that so…

By the middle of the 18th century, the tax on tea had risen so high that tea smuggling began. This also lead to the product’s adulteration as it was a most profitable commodity. It wasn’t until Prime Minister William Pitt had the Commutation Act passed which cut the tax on tea from 119% to 12.5% that tea smuggling ended. Adulteration of tea continued however, until the English Food and Drug Act of 1875 that imposed heavy fines or imprisonment.

January 17, 2020

‘Grasse of India’ – Kannauj (Perfume Making)

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 10:19 am

Kannauj is a small town between Lucknow and Agra, that has an older history of perfumeries than Grasse in France. Well connected with India’s best expressway, Lucknow-Agra, Kannuaj falls just about 2 hours away from Lucknow and about 2.5 hours from Agra and is a convenient stopover on this route.

Perfumes from Kannauj have a long history and have enjoyed royal patronage – they were worn by the Mughal Emperors for their high quality and unique scents. It is believed that Kannauj has been a perfumery town since more than 1000 years and the traditional perfume making skills of perfumers are passed on from one generation to another within the family. The traditional perfumes are called ‘Itar’ or ‘Attar’ and are usually made from flowers and herbs, but one of the unique varieties here is made from mud, where the scent of first monsoon rain on dry earth is captured to create a perfume. Very few would know, that some of the leading international brands of perfumes pick-up concentrates from here for further production, giving Kannauj perfumes an international reach.

Though a lot of world around Kannauj has changed, but the town of Kannauj still takes pride in producing perfumes in traditional ways and passing on the art within the family of perfumers. One can smell the fragrance even in the drains of Kannuaj, in which the residue from innumerable perfumeries flow.

We have curated a very exclusive experience around the perfume industry of Kannauj, as a great introduction and appreciation of the traditional art of perfume making, that has survived all the modern interventions in this field only to produce the best of fragrances.

Cost :

INR 15,000 per person (operates on minimum 2 guests)

Starting Time : 

8:30 – 9 am (Flexible)

Expected Duration : 

5-6 hours

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive tour.

Guests are picked up from their hotel in the city (Agra or Lucknow) and dropped in any hotel (Agra or Lucknow). The duration of this tour is about 5 hrs.

Best suited for guests travelling between Agra and Lucknow as an en route experience. Though may also be taken as an excursion from any of the two cities.

This tour is not conducted on Tuesday & Sunday and on any National Holiday.

This tour remains suspended for a fortnight after the Indian festivals of Diwali, Holi and Eid.

Programme…

  • Post breakfast pick up from any hotel in Lucknow/Agra and drive to Kannauj (2 / 2.5 hrs drive).
  • Reach Kannauj by 1100 hrs and start your tour by visiting the flower fields to understand the early morning plucking process (plucking of flowers takes place at sunrise, thus it is only possible to see this where an overnight stay is involved).
  • Break for lunch either at a local restaurant or enjoy a packed lunch within the perfumery
  • Later at the perfumery, understand the traditional art of developing the essential
  • After understanding the process, visit a perfume store to enjoy a tea session with a perfumer who will talk about different scents.
  • Tour will end at about 1600 to drive further to Lucknow/Agra (2 / 2.5 hours).

January 15, 2020

Ayodhya Tour (Excursion)

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 5:42 am

(same day return trip from Lucknow to Ayodhya, 11-12 hours, including driving time, visits and activities)

Post early breakfast (ideal time to leave: 0730 hrs or earlier, the better) we will leave Lucknow for Ayodhya (150 km / 2.5 hrs),

Upon arrival we will visit Ram Janam Bhoomi, Hanuman Gari and later visit Kanak Bhawan. We will enjoy our lunch at the temple complex of Kanak Bhawan.

Post lunch we will reach Kanchan Bhawan the starting point of our Mokshdayani Walk. Walking through the stretch by the side of Saryu river we will finally reach Nageshwarnath temple, from here we reach the river-ghat to board our boat.

Enjoy a short joy ride through the fast flowing river and later we reach the ghat to witness and indulge in the aarti ceremony. We will now board our car and return to Lucknow, to reach by late dinner time.

Highlights : In Ayodhya visit of Ram Janam Bhoomi, Mokshdayni Walk; A short motor boat ride on Saryu river and diya-offering (earthen lamps); Lunch at Kanak Bhawan Rasoi served in copper utensils.

Cost :

INR 10,000 per person (operates on minimum 2 guests)

Starting Time : 

7:30 – 8:30 am (Flexible)

Expected Duration : 

11-12 hours

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive tour.

*Pickup time from city hotels.  Timings are flexible and may be altered after prior discussion.

Expect to return by/for late dinner to Lucknow.

 

January 14, 2020

Lucknow Plan (LP) -Not EP, not CP, not MAP, not AP

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 8:31 am

Sights, Sounds, Smells and Sapidity  of Lucknow on this tour. We take you on the food trail from early hours of the morning till late in the night, include the fabulous monuments and also show you the intangible heritage of this fabled city, all in a day. This is a complete day package that includes all except your hotel stay to show you Lucknow as no one has ever seen.

What you eat ?

  • Mattha : Buttermilk flavoured with black salt and cumin.
  • Jalebi : A popular sweet made from a fermented batter of refined wheat flour, deep fried in pretzels and dunked in saffron-sugar syrup, usually had with plain yogurt, as a breakfast dish.
  • Khasta : Wheat dough stuffed with a fine paste of black lentil and deep fried in ghee, served with a spicy potato preparation.
  • Lassi : Thick whisked sweet yogurt topped with cream.
  • Poori : Flattened deep fried bread, flavoured with carom seeds, served with potato and chick pea preparation.
  • Thandai : A refreshing and a healthy milk based drink having a combination of almond paste and condiments.
  • Paani Batashey : A crispy round hollow semolina canopies filled with tangy and spicy water had as an evening snack.
  • All that is on our Culinary Walk

What you see ?

Botanical Garden Asfi Imambara Husainabad Imambara Residency
Dhobi Ghat La Martiniere Dilkusha Heritage Walk

 

Cost :

INR 8000 per person (min 2 guests)

Starting Time : 

5:30 am

Expected Duration : 

15-16 hours

Remarks : 

This is an exhaustive and a long tour. Guests must be foodies, loving food adventure to fully enjoy this tour.

Does not operate on Thursday & Sunday

January 13, 2020

Curated Dining at Chak House (Awadhi-Kashmiri Cuisine)

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 11:55 am

(Kashmiri-Awadhi Cuisine) Tornos’ Home dining experience – by appointment

The Kashmiri Mohalla was a colony created in the Nawabi era when the then Nawab, Asaf ud Daula shifted his capital from Faizabad to Lucknow, bringing hundreds of Kashmiri families to live in the city. This was the largest group of Kashmiris who ever travelled out of Kashmir to settle anywhere outside Kashmir.

Kashmiris in Lucknow, just like any other community, have had their own unique history, traditions and cooking styles which blended well with the Awadhi culture, giving rise to a very distinct culinary tradition in Lucknow, known as Kashmiri-Awadhi cuisine, which was nowhere to be found other than in Lucknow.

One such family was ‘Chak’ family which made Lucknow their home and then could never leave Lucknow. This highly educated and cultured family still keeps its culinary traditions alive with their loyalty to Kashmiri-Awadhi cuisine in their daily lives, and is happy to showcase their culinary skills to discerning guests. This remarkable cuisine otherwise is unavailable anywhere outside a few Kashmiri homes in Lucknow, one of course being the Chaks, who still cook with pride these inherited Kashmiri-Awadhi recipes.

A typical evening here starts with an introduction to his family and a casual conversation over evening drinks, followed by a live cooking demonstration in the family’s kitchen, thereafter a home cooked dinner constituting dishes from family’s well guarded dining heritage follows. Tornos in an exclusive arrangements with the Chak family organises this at their Lucknow home.

Cost :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Starting Time : 

Winters / Summers – 7 pm

Expected Duration : 

2.5 hours

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive and privileged home dining product that operates every day by appointment and pre-booking.

Under this product the main focus is on food and not on entertainment.

The menu is curated by the family itself for the day and the meal is based on fixed menu or could be pre-plated.

This family has a long and illustrious culinary tradition and is known to be loyal to it even today. It is just this passion for authentic family recipes and undiluted tradition of culinary expertise that is the highlight of the meals served here.

January 12, 2020

Coquina – Learn to Cook & Dine

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 7:57 am

An experiential dining – by appointment 

Coquina is an artisanal kitchen that experiments with food from local produce in small portions. It offers a combination of traditional and modern cooking by knowledgeable individuals, who are cooks by passion and not by profession. Our guests get a chance to learn about this Passion Cuisine, cook for themselves under expert supervision and learn the art of cooking a local meal. The concept is to learn from the local cuisine under a local expert guidance, while the booking at Coquina is for an exclusive private learning session only – It welcomes discerning travellers who intend to understand, learn and experiment with local cuisines for an experience. Many dishes that were once extinct or were just a home-kitchen names in Awadh homes or even were secret recipes from the royal kitchens of nobility in Awadh, are revived here to be once again spread all over, as a secret re-told by Coquina.

Coquina is a small immaculately furnished and a well equipped home kitchen (Booked privately by appointment, not an open commercial facility like a restaurant), that is happy to welcome a maximum of four guests at a time, but is rather happier with just even one or two for a private cooking session. Coquina welcomes only food loving discerning travellers who intend to understand and learn about Awadhi cuisine.

Our guests are discerning travellers, who look for experiential tours that give them a purpose to travel apart from leisure and pleasure. At Coquina they can learn to cook a few dishes from the array of complex Awadhi cuisine.and our dishes do not stop at the meaty dishes borrowed from the Nawabs, but also appreciate Awadhi influence in Kayasthas (white collared class from Hindu community), Anglo-Indian cuisine from Lucknow, Rastogis (business class, often associated with the selling of Chikan garments in Lucknow) and of course the staunch Brahamins from this Nawabi influenced city.

At Coquina we can give lessons to cook a special Awadhi cuisine in our private kitchen, let our guests cook under supervision, learn all about food history and enjoy a hearty meal.

Allow us to pamper you at The Coquina…

January 11, 2020

Grave Tending by Tornos

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 12:42 pm

Lucknow and Kanpur have played a very important role in the Indian Mutiny of 1857 and thereafter in the days of Raj till 1947. Many a British made this their home, and were laid to rest in the graveyards in these cities and places around these.

At times these graves are left un-cared for years and years together and often fall prey to nature’s decay.

We at Tornos understand the sentiments of the families of the buried and offer our services as Grave Tenders. Since 1997 we have had a specialised research team that locates these graves on request, with certain mandatory inputs (we have located about 113 graves) and now can adopt these on behalf of the families abroad.

Cost & Details :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Walter Burley Griffin’s Lucknow

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 12:17 pm

Walter Burley Griffin born on 24th November 1876 was an architect. He was responsible for designing Australia’s capital city Canberra. His specialty has been to develop L-shaped plan, carport and reinforced concrete.

In his early years Griffin was quite influenced by Prairie School based in Chicago. His partnership with his wife, Marion Mahony Griffin at work proved to be quite a success. They together worked to create about 350 designs in just 28 years. The couple was also designing furniture, interiors and other household items.

Griffins moved to Lucknow (India) after they got the contract of an agriculture exhibition design to be held here. Upon arrival they fell in love with Lucknow and made it their home. The landmark buildings that Griffin designed in Lucknow were, Pioneer Press Building, Interiors of Capitol Cinema House, a Zenana at the Jhangirabad, Tagore Library at the University of Lucknow and a few private houses as well.

Griffin died in early 1937, just 5 days after a gall bladder surgery that went wrong at King George’s Medical College in Lucknow. He was then buried in Lucknow while his wife, Marion Mahony Griffin returned to Chicago.

Tornos conducts a special tour woven around Walter Burley Griffin’s Lucknow with special visits to surviving buildings and location where he built. A visit to his restored grave is also a part of this tour. This tour may also be merged with other interests.

Read more about Walter Burley Griffin

Cost :

INR 8500 per person

Starting Time : 

Winters / Summers – 9 am (Flexible)

Expected Duration : 

4-5 hours 

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive special interest tour that operates every day.

Ideal time of starting would be 0900 hrs, though may be altered as per individual requirements, while expect to return to the hotel by 1300 / 1400 hrs.

Residency Reconstructed

Filed under: Home Product Box,Walks — Tornos @ 12:07 pm

(Walking Tour)

Lucknow Residency was an abode of the British Resident, appointed as an administrator of Oudh by The East India Company. The total area of 33 acres was no less than a self-sufficient residential colony of British officers, their families and native servants. A place that was a lively European settlement till the month of May-1857, fell in the hands of the spirited mutineers and within a period of eighty seven days the entire complex was reduced to ruins, not before taking away lives of more than 2000 British men, women and innocent children within the complex.

On this 3 hours walking tour, we reconstruct the ruins within the complex, with the help of some rare pictures, building plans and maps. Also understand the events of 1857-58, with a focused reference to the Residency complex, enjoy 20 minutes documentary and refreshments served here with compliments. A mutiny expert guide will lead this very curated and a well-researched tour, supported by texts, pictures and maps. The tour has an option of a complimentary afternoon tea at The Tornos Studio that stocks the largest and the best collection of books and literature based on Indian Mutiny.

Cost :

INR 3000 per person

Starting Time : 

10:30 am (*1st time slot)

2:30 pm (*2nd time slot)

Expected Duration : 

2.5 – 3 hours

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive Residency tour covering the campus in in great detail.

Does not operate on Friday and a few other holidays.

Threads of Lucknow (Embroidery Workshop)

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 12:07 pm

Click Here to see a few pictures

Lucknow has been a center of great embroideries, that have survived the strong winds of change to flourish even today. Chikan for example, is an art that provides livelihood to so many women in and around Lucknow, empowers them to be a part of the thriving local economy, supplements their household income and above all keeps the traditional craft alive. Men on another hand, contribute their finesse to other forms of embroidery, Zari and Aari in particular. These are mostly done at the small studios within the homes of designers, on big wooden frames with many men working together on a single piece to churn out an exquisite example of craft.

Another high-point is that this embroidery has bound the two diverse communities of Hindus and Muslims together in Lucknow, where both live in utmost peace and harmony. This is a result of a delicate economic relationship shared by them. Hindu trading community, referred to as Rastogis, sell the embroidered craft, while Muslims are involved as craftsmen.

How awesome it is to learn about this craft from the men and women at a designer’s studio on a half-day hands-on experiential sojourn. Each guest gets a personal embroidery kit to learn the craft, a talk is delivered by a designer and guests are taught this intricate embroidery.

Click Here to see a few pictures

Cost :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Starting Time :

11 am (Flexible)

Expected Duration :

4 – 4.5 hours (split in two halves, pre-lunch & post lunch)

Remarks :

This is a learning experience (hands-on) of hand embroidery for special interest groups.

The workshop is held at a designer’s home. 

Does not operate on a few festivals such as Holi, Diwali, Eid & Mohorram.

Aristocratic Home Dining in Lucknow

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 12:06 pm

(Itaunja House) – by appointment

The royal estate of the Itaunja (now a small town on the road to Sitapur) is about 40 km from Lucknow and the main palace of Itaunja is situated there. Lucknow being the capital of Oudh and later United Provinces was supposed to have representative homes of all royalty that came under it, so did Itaunja. Most of these royal estates had much larger homes initially, but after India became independent, most of these royalties either lost portions of their city palaces to government, leaving them with only small areas to live (though these are still too large as compared to modern homes) or sold off portions to augment their incomes. Similarly Itaunja House, the city palace of Itaunja Royalty retained the main portion of the palace, maintaining it as their inherited heritage home, which the family continues to use as their home.

A beautiful lobby leads guests to Itaunja House, where the architecture, high ceiling rooms,  black and white marble and coloured glass windows are enough to take guests back to glorious times when the family ruled an entire town of Itaunja. Raja Raghavendra Pratap Singh, Raja of Itaunja, is a sophisticated gentleman and passionate about restoring the palace both here and in his estate, Itaunja. His degree in design is evident in colours and décor that he has judiciously used while restoring his home and still maintaining its soul. “During the World War, this home was actually turned into an extension of King George’s Hospital due to paucity of beds there, given its proximity to the hospital” – this unknown fact and many other such interesting ones will be a part of conversation that Raj Sahib Itaunja will have with guests over drinks. Culinary tradition of Itaunja is yet another reason to be here, where the family has an array of closely guarded family recipes from which they curate the day’s dinner.

A typical evening here starts with an introduction to his family and a casual conversation over evening drinks followed by a home cooked dinner constituting dishes from family’s well guarded dining heritage. Tornos has exclusive arrangements with the family that organises this at their home, The Itaunja House. Top it up with a Kathak Interpretation,

Cost :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Starting Time : 

Winters / Summers – 7 pm

Expected Duration : 

2.5 hours

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive and privileged home dining product that operates every day by appointment and pre-booking.

The menu is curated by the family itself for the day and the meal is based on fixed menu or could be pre-plated.

This family has a long and illustrious culinary tradition and is known to be loyal to it even today. It is just this passion for authentic family recipes and undiluted tradition of culinary expertise that is the highlight of the meals served here.

Bells, Beats & Ballet – Kathak Workshop

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 11:40 am

Kathak is one of the eight classical dance forms of India. Its famous three ‘gharanas’ or the schools are Lucknow, Jaipur and Banaras, where Lucknow is considered to be the most superior of these all, due to its distinctive style that includes intricate hand, foot and eye movement and above all, intense facial expressions that make the story come alive. From love stories of Lord Krishna, to description of Lord Shiva’s personality, from entertainment evenings at the royal courts of Mughals and the Nawabs of Awadh or for that matter a devotee’s love for God as part of Sufi belief, Kathak is about visually narrating a story through a dance. Kathak dance form is in fact the most secular of all dance forms in India, living up to Hindu-Muslim unity, in line with secular principles of Awadh, particularly that of Lucknow, which is a part of its social fabric.

Under our product, ‘Bells, Beats and Ballet – (Kathak Workshop), we at Tornos bring to you 3 exciting options to choose from:-

  • (1 hour) ‘Watch them Learn & Perform’ at a Kathak School’
  • (2 hours) ‘Learning and Appreciation Session’
  • (2 days) ‘Intensive Understanding Programme’ of Kathak
Cost :

INR 2500 per person – (1 hour) ‘Watch them Learn & Perform’ at a Kathak School’

INR 3500 per person – (2 hours) ‘Learning and Appreciation Session’

INR 10,000 per person – (2 days) ‘Intensive Understanding Programme’ of Kathak

Starting Time : 

6 pm – (1 hour) ‘Watch them Learn & Perform’ at a Kathak School’

6 pm – (2 hours) ‘Learning and Appreciation Session’

10 am – (2 days / 12 hours) ‘Intensive Understanding Programme’ of Kathak

Expected Duration : 

1 or 2 hours as per programme chosen.

For 2 days Intensive Understanding Programme – 6 hours a day / 12 hours

Remarks : 

2 Days intensive understanding programme will require a notice well in advance to fix an exclusive session with the teacher. 

 

Un Morceau de France aux Indes (French Influence on Lucknow)

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 11:17 am

Day tour exploring the French influence on Lucknow

The Europeans who came to India for trade, established themselves at various places including Lucknow. Lucknow of course known as a city of Nawabs, had a huge European population, apart from British it was majorly that of French.

French inspired the cultural fabric of Lucknow and even got inspired themselves. Reciprocal influences can be seen in the areas of art, culture, heritage, lifestyle, architecture and even food. French influence can be seen in the architecture, such as that of its churches, palaces, residential quarters and administrative buildings. It is also evident in other forms, such as the extensive use of chiffon in Lucknow’s fashion, decor by way of bohemian mirrors, chandeliers decorating the ceilings and depiction of mermaids on historical monuments.

La Martiniere & Chateau de Lyon are two of the most prominent edifices of their times that still stand strong to prove French presence in Lucknow. It may sound a bit strange, but Awadh was perhaps one place where British and French lived in harmony and co-existed in the courts of Nawabs, as a strong support for their administration.

On this curated day tour, ‘Un morceau de France aux Indes’, we discover the French connection of Lucknow and unearth some unknown facts that relate well to the subject. An extensive research and planning has gone in to make this tour a fascinating experience that will awestruck even a well-read historian.

Cost :

INR 8500 per person 

Starting Time : 

9 am (Flexible)

Expected Duration : 

5-6 hours

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive tour and conducted in English only.

As a special interest tour this only concentrates on the subject of French Influence on Lucknow.

Some visits on this tour require prior permissions, thus it is advisable to book this well in advance. 

 

Weeping Lucknow – Muharram

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 10:49 am

Understanding the 68 days of mourning in Lucknow* 

Muharram is the first month of the Islamic calendar and the most important month for Muslims after Ramzan (Ramadan). Instead of joyous celebration, Shia Muslims mark the beginning of the New Year with sorrow by participating in mournful gatherings – mourning the martyrdom of Imam Hussain, the grandson of Prophet Muhammad, at the Battle of Karbala.

Other than Iran, India has the largest Shia population in the world, while Lucknow hosts the most in India, thus the observance of Muharram in Lucknow is the longest, most unique and beyond compare.

We take you on a curated tour of Lucknow’s Muhharam, where one experiences, how the city has maintained the legacy of this mourning custom from the Nawabi era till date and that too unchanged. Hindus too take part in these rituals with great reverence and devotion, making Muharram a unique feature in the socio-cultural fabric of Lucknow, presenting an unparalleled example of Hindu-Muslim unity in the city.

Cost :

INR 10,000 per person (minimum 02 guests) – per day/per event as per calendar* 

Starting Time : 

1:30 pm (starts from Lucknow)

Expected Duration : 

10-11 hours (minimum)

Remarks : 

This tour is date specific and this too may change by a day as per Islamic lunar calendar.

Ritualistically guests are required to wear simple black clothes in keeping with the tradition of mourning.

Some of the rituals might not be very pleasing to eyes and better avoided by faint-hearted guests and children.  

Most of the events are crowded and involve a walk due to traffic congestion and security restrictions. 

*Muharram Event Calendar

Highlight Day & Event 2020
1st Shahi Zari ka Juloos 18th / 19th Aug
From 2nd till 5th day there are no specific public programmes, except for daily congression. This period is not recommended for inclusion as it may not be as visually exciting.
6th Aag ka Matam 24th / 25th Aug
7th Janbe Qasim ka Mehndi ka Jullos 25th / 26th Aug
8th Alam-e-Fateh-e-Furat 26th / 27th Aug
9th Alam-e-Yadgar-e-Hussaini 27th / 28th Aug
10th Jullos-e-Ashura 28th / 29th Aug
From 11th till 49th day there are no specific public programmes, except for daily congression. This period is not recommended for inclusion as it may not be as visually exciting.
50th Chehlum 7th / 8th Oct

From 51st till 67th day there are no specific public programmes, except for daily congression. This period is not recommended for inclusion as it may not be as visually exciting.

68th Chup Taziya 25th / 26th Oct

Taste of Labour (Culinary Experience)

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 9:38 am

– by appointment

After a day’s hard work and toiling all day it is a humble cuisine that labourers cook for themselves every evening with limited means at their disposal but with great heart and full soul.

We at Tornos have learnt to appreciate this unique cuisine that we call, ‘Taste of Labour’, very basic but a hearty meal that tastes quite different due to labour being one of its ingredients. We will take you to a construction site to experience the dinner preparation just after the day’s labour. Learn step by step cooking, from lighting the fire to plating the meal. Each step is unbelievable, style of lighting fire, pounding of garlic with the back of a steel glass, or for that matter bread being rolled with a rolling pin all are so unique to labourers’ cuisine.

Believe us, there is absolutely no parallel in the style of cooking and the taste of food cooked by the labourers on the roadside at the construction sites or their makeshift abode on the streets.

Cost :

INR 4750 per person (minimum 2 guests)

Starting Time :

6:30 pm (operational from October-March only) 

Expected Duration :

2.5 hours

Remarks :

This is an experience with an exclusive arrangements at a building site where daily-wage labourers work. 

To appreciate the cooking methods, rustic taste one needs to be a food enthusiast leaving aside many inhibition.

Though basic hygiene standards are maintained yet there may be some visuals that may not stand in confirmation with international hygiene practices which will have to be overlooked in order to enjoy this experience in an unpretentious way. 

Ram Vivah in Ayodhya – When Ram weds Sita

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 9:11 am

(Excursion to Ayodhya on specific event dates*) 

Indian wedding is not just a ritual but actually a phase when a Hindu steps into, ‘Grahast Ashram’ – the worldly life of being married. This Hindu ritual draws inspiration from the wedding of Ram-Sita, a couple who is considered perfect in all senses and a wedlock that had absolutely no flaw at all.

Just a 2 hours drive from takes us to Ayodhya, an ancient religious city where Lord Rama was born. This city is deeply rooted to its traditions and customs, one of it being Ram Vivah or the Wedding of Lord Rama with Sita. This actually is ‘not to be missed’ event in Ayodhya and according to Hindu calendar falls on, ‘Aghan Vivah Panchami’, the day when Lord Rama married Sita the daughter of Janak along with his three brothers, Laxman, Bharat & Shatrudhan who married Urmila, Mandavi & Shrutikirti respectively.

We at Tornos organise this very curated tour of Ayodhya that not only includes the tour of temples, evening Aarti of river Saryu, but also takes you to show the different wedding processions that originate on this particular day from different Ashrams and move through the city to reach the wedding venue, where cultural performances are held and all the wedding rituals follow all night.

*Ram Vivah Tour Date (subject to change by one day plus/minus as per Hindu calendar)

2020 – Saturday, 19th December

2021 – Wednesday, 8th December

2022 – Monday, 28th November

2023 – Sunday, 17th December

2024 – Friday, 6th December

Cost :

INR 13500 per person (minimum 02 guests)

Starting Time : 

1:30 pm (starts from Lucknow)

Expected Duration : 

10-11 hours (minimum)

Remarks : 

This tour starts from Lucknow.

Return is open to guest at an optional time anytime after late dinner 2200 hrs, as few guests may not prefer seeing all overnight wedding rituals. 

As an option an overnight stay can also be provided in Ayodhya under this product with an additional cost. 

What all you should not expect on these tours ?

  • If you plan to stay in Ayodhya/Faizabad, do not expect a star category like hotel comforts, though we try and compensate many shortcomings by including a tea and coffee maker in room, supervised cleaning and steward in attendance. Of course it would be a neat and clean air-conditioned accommodation with modern facilities yet it might be a bit challenging for a few.
  • Meals served here are strictly vegetarian meals and at times may not include ginger and garlic, having warned about this we still highly rate the meals served, as it is an experience in itself. Some of our guests may find an Indian breakfast too heavy to be relished, thus we have an alternate arrangement in place to include packed croissants, soft bread, butter, preserves, muffins, juices etc. but again please do not expect this to be an elaborate spread.
  • Ayodhya is a wonderful religious town with a rich culture and provides a great experience but to enjoy it , you need to overlook many shortcomings at times in terms of infrastructure that often remains an issue in all ancient Indian towns, with limited space and resources. At all levels we try and do our best to provide you a great experience devoid of all shortcomings, yet urge you to be accommodating and understand that often things may not move the way you want them to.
  • While utmost care has been taken in terms of multiple reconnaissance tours and researches before the launch of all our tour programmes, but most of our programmes are unique and quite out of box, thus there might be certain inclusions or visits that practically do not fit in at the last moment for many unforeseen reasons and last moment developments. In such cases we reserve the right to change to an alternate programme that should be equally exciting and we would recommend you accept it with trust on us to enjoy the tour.

Aminabad Shophistory Walk

Filed under: Home Product Box,Walks — Tornos @ 7:53 am

Nawab Asif-ud-Daula, gave the area of Aminabad to Shah Alam-II in 1759, who constructed an Imambara, a Feelkhana (Elephant House) and a garden along with a number shops. After his death, his wife sold the entire property to Imdad Hussain Khan Amin-ud-Daula. Imdad Hussain added further constructions and the market came up then, known as Aminabad.

After the mutiny of 1857, the entire area came under the rule of the British. Later in 1905 Lt. Governor Sir J.D. Latouche, visited Aminabad and ordered its renovation. It was then that Loutouche Road leading to this market came into existence and till date is called so. The renovated Aminabad was inaugurated by Sir Loutouche himself in 1911.

In fact, Aminabad is a combination of various markets, cluster of houses, offices and is often compared to the bustling Chandani Chowk of Delhi.

We take you on an evening walking tour of this market and show you some of its bustling bazaars, that are so very exciting to understand and to shop at. Refugee Market is known to have given refuge to the business community from the partitioned Pakistan and is still known so. Or for that matter, Swadeshi Market that so very religiously stopped selling foreign goods, when Mahatma Gandhi gave a call to shun foreign goods. Also Garbar-Jhaala, known for its highest bargaining shops, where one can get the prices reduced by 200% at times, if only one has skills to bargain.

We at Tornos show you these markets, let you meet the local shoppers, and give you a dose of history, showing you the places that weave history into this market place, making Aminabad a place to walk, understand local shoppers’ lifestyle, and experience the hustle & bustle of a local market, not to mention some great shopping deals that you can strike as well.

Cost :

INR 4000 per person (Minimum 2 guests)

Starting Time :

3:30 pm

Expected Duration :

2 hours

Remarks :

This walking tour is available in two time slots, morning and afternoon.

This tour covers a a crowded old market, a bit chaotic but a great way to understand how this market place evolved into a bustling bazaar.

Does not operate on Thursday a few festivals such as Holi, Diwali, Eid & Mohorram.

Oriental Walk

Filed under: Home Product Box,Walks — Tornos @ 7:43 am

Not only that Lucknow is architecturally awesome but also well planned, quite like the way a capital should be. Most of the Nawabi heritage monuments of the early 18th and late 19th centuries happen to be in a systematic layout as if each Nawab knew what’s about to come up next. Specially the Asfi & the Husainabad complexes and its periphery so systematically line up the concrete heritage of the city as if it were all made for future generations of 21st century  to admire and appreciate the plan.

On this walking tour we not only explore the main landmarks of the Nawabi heritage, but also detail some nooks and corners in the periphery without which history of Lucknow is just incomplete. This three hours walking tour is one of the most revealing tour of discoveries in Lucknow.

Cost :

INR 2750 per person (Shared Walk)

INR 11000 (Up to 4 persons – Exclusive Walk)

Starting Time : 

9 am (*1st time slot)

3 pm (*2nd time slot)

Expected Duration : 

3 hours

Remarks : 

This walking tour is available in two time slots, morning and afternoon.

This tour covers a heritage monuments in the old city and many other places that otherwise are not a part of general sightseeing tour.

Does not operate on Friday and a few festivals such as Holi, Eid & Mohorram.

Golf in Lucknow

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 7:06 am

India was the first country outside of Great Britain to take up the game of golf. The Royal Calcutta Golf Club, established in 1829, happens to be the oldest golf club in India, and the first outside Great Britain. A little later La Martiniere Golf Club was established in Lucknow, much before golf came to Delhi.

At that time river Gomti was a vibrant clean flowing river noted for fish, fowl and pearls. In such idyllic surroundings the white sahibs, wielded Brassie (fairway woods) and Niblicks (wedges), while their `Madam Sahibs’, trotted up and down in riding breeches on what has since become, Kalidas Marg. The present club-house did not exist then. The first tee was laid out somewhere near the present Haider Canal (which is adjoining the present Lohia Path road to Gomti Nagar). The course was open to the members of the United Services Club and a select few `brown sahibs’ (Indian elites) and ‘Talukdars’ (Indian landlords).

Spreading over 70 acres, it offers 9 holes, par 71 challenging golf course, measuring 6391 yards. The course features lush green fairways, large old trees, and two water hazards. The best and the longest hole on the golf course is hole 07 that plays 584 yards from Men’s tee.

On this tour you not only play a game of golf, but also enjoy some bird watching, with vivid varieties of birds that flock the area. Also, watch the little ones go to school at La Martiniere and watch the boys assemble for their morning assembly, that indeed is a pleasant sight to behold.

Cost :

INR 7000 per person

Starting Time :

Winters (Nov-Feb) – 6 am

Summers (Mar-Oct) – 5 am

Expected Duration :

2 – 3 hours

Remarks :

This programme is only open to registered golfers and is not a general programme. 

This programme may be suspended due to rains.

We recommend golfers to carry their own kit, though kits in limited numbers are available with us as well and we can offer the same at no extra cost.

Does not operate on Saturday, Sunday & Monday. 

Know a bit about Golf….

While the modern game of golf originated in 15th century Scotland, the game’s ancient origins are unclear and much debated. Some historians trace the sport back to the Roman game of paganica, in which participants used a bent stick to hit a stuffed leather ball. One theory asserts that paganica spread throughout Europe as the Romans conquered most of the continent, during the first century BC, and eventually evolved into the modern game. The first written record of golf is James II’s banning of the game in 1457, as an unwelcome distraction to learning archery. To many golfers, the Old Course at St Andrews, a links course dating to before 1574, is considered to be a site of pilgrimage. Golf is documented as being played on Musselburgh Links, East Lothian, Scotland as early as 2 March 1672, which is certified as the oldest golf course in the world by Guinness World Records. The oldest surviving rules of golf were compiled in March 1744 for the Company of Gentlemen Golfers, later renamed The Honourable Company of Edinburgh Golfers, which was played at Leith, Scotland. The world’s oldest golf tournament in existence, and golf’s first major, is The Open Championship, which was first played on 17 October 1860 at Prestwick Golf Club, in Ayrshire, Scotland.

Dhobi Ghat

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 6:43 am

Washer men colouring the banks of river Gomti

We take you on a journey through the ghats of river Gomti and showcase the last phase of colourful chikan embroidered garments, when they are washed after being stitched and before reaching the emporia. As the hand embroidered garments get dirty when going under the hands of master crafts-women for days and months together, these garments are sent for a last wash, starch and ironing.

Every morning washer men get these garments from the manufacturers and bring them to the river for a wash. Each moment is breathtakingly beautiful, be it the rhythmic sound of beating clothes on the boulders, the water being sprinkled artistically in the air and the colourful stocks being hung to dry in the sun. The entire river bank is a spray of colours and activity par excellence. Complement this visit with a chilled Lassi or Thandai served in earthen cups called kulhar, talk to the washer men to know about their community or just roam around the ghats and appreciate the embroidery on hundreds of hanging garments. Sitting on a jute cot called ‘charpoy’ , enjoy the folk songs sung by the washer men called ‘Dhobiya’.

Cost :

INR 35000 (valid for 10 persons)

Starting Time :

11 am (pre-lunch) – time flexible 

Expected Duration :

1 – 1.5 hours

Remarks :

This programme is subject to availability of washer men on the river bank.

Often due to rains or extreme cold the programme is suspended 

Mokshdayni Ayodhya Walk

Filed under: Home Product Box,Walks — Tornos @ 5:58 am

Kanchan Bhawan is the starting point of our Mokshdayni Walk in Ayodhya. This walk is curated by Tornos and is quite an exclusive walking tour. It is based on the concept of life by the side of the River Saryu, this walking tour introduces us to the life of this ancient Hindu-city that is not only the birth place of Lord Rama, but has a vivid history and religious interpretations that make each home, ghat and each temple here unique with a story attached to it and a strong logic behind each one. Be it the Jhumki Ghat named after a saint, who is said to be a devout worshiper of Sita, or Sahast Dhara that till dates holds the distinction of taking away the life of a wrong doer who swears by the river Saryu in his own defence. We also visit Nageshwarnath Temple on this walking tour before ending this walk at the ghat for Saryu Aarti* .

Cost :

INR 4500 per person (operates on minimum 2 guests)

Starting Time : 

Winters (Nov-Feb) – 3 pm

Summers (Mar-Oct) – 4:15 pm

Expected Duration : 

2.5 hours

Remarks : 

This walking tour is a pre-breakfast / post lunch tour in Ayodhya and starts from Kanchan Bhawan (Rin Mochan Ghat) to end at Nageshwarnath Temple, followed by River *Saryu Aarti.

The total duration of this walking tour is 2.5 hours.

*Aarti is a part of this walking tour and is performed by our guests with special and privileged arrangements.

Thursday Sufi Sojourn

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 5:07 am

Waris Ali Shah or Sarkar Waris Pak was a sufi saint from Dewa, in Barabanki near Lucknow, who was the successor of the Qadriyya–Razzakiyya Silsila (sect). He was from the 26th generation of Hazrat Imam Hussain and was born in 1809.

Sarkar Waris Pak accepted millions of people belonging to all faith into his commune. During that period, Firangi Mahal was the most famous religious centre for Muslims, and they too respected Waris Pak. This endorsement by Firangi Mahal was enough to accord credibility to him. Waris Ali Shah died on 7th April 1905 and was buried at this spot in Dewa. This place is marked by a monument erected in his memory by his followers. The architecture represents communal harmony. It was constructed on a pattern, blending the Hindu and Iranian architecture.

We pick the guests from their city hotels at 1745 hrs, in an exclusive air-conditioned car/coach accompanied by a guide, who en route to Dewa Sharif will explain about this faith. In Dewa Sharif, you not only get to offer your respect to the grave inside in this shrine, by way of ‘chadar-poshi’ (respectful offering of grave covering cloth and flowers), but you also enjoy a seated sessions with the Qawals (devotional Sufi singers), while our expert guide translates the song that is sung in the honor of the sufi saint.

Cost :

INR 4000 per person (operates on minimum 2 guests) – shared

Starting Time : 

5:45 pm*

Expected Duration : 

3 hours

Remarks : 

This is a shared visit that operates only on Thursdays.

*Pickup time from city hotels (Hotel Ramada pickups and drops will be on a supplement)

Timings are flexible and may be altered after prior discussion.

About Sufism in India

Sufism has an illustrious history in India evolving for over 1,000 years. The presence of Sufism has been a leading entity increasing the reaches of Islam throughout the subcontinent. Following the entrance of Islam in the early 700s, Sufi mystic traditions became more visible during the 10th and 11th centuries of the Delhi Sultanate. A conglomeration of four chronologically separate dynasties, the early Delhi Sultanate consisted of rulers from Turkic and Afghan lands. This Persian influence flooded the subcontinent with Islam, Sufi thought, syncretic values, literature, education, and entertainment that has created an enduring impact on the presence of Islam in India today.

Various leaders of Sufi orders, tariqa, chartered the first organized activities to introduce localities to Islam through Sufism. Saint figures and mythical stories provided solace and inspiration to Hindu caste communities often in rural villages of India. The Sufism teachings of divine spirituality, cosmic harmony, love, and humanity resonated with the common people and still does so today. The following content will take a thematic approach to discuss a myriad of influences that helped spread Sufism and a mystical understanding of Islam, making India a contemporary epicenter for Sufi culture today.

Musical Influence

Music has always been present as a rich tradition among all Indian religions. As an influential medium to disperse ideas, music has appealed to people for generations. The audience in India was already familiar with hymns in local languages. Thus Sufi devotional singing was instantly successful among the populations. Music transmitted Sufi ideals seamlessly. In Sufism, the term music is called “sa’ma” or literary audition. This is where poetry would be sang to instrumental music; this ritual would often put Sufis into spiritual ecstasy. The common depiction of whirling dervishes dressed in white cloaks come to picture when paired with “sa’ma.” Many Sufi traditions encouraged poetry and music as part of education. Sufism spread widely with their teachings packaged in popular songs accessing mass demographics. Women were especially affected; often used to sing Sufi songs during the day and in female gatherings. Sufi gatherings today are known as qawali. One of the biggest contributors to the musical Sufi tradition was Amir Khusro (d. 1325). Known as a disciple of Nizamuddin Chishti, Amir was known as the most talented musical poet in the early Muslim period of India. He is considered the founder of Indo-Muslim devotional music traditions. Nicknamed “Parrot of India”, Amir Khusro furthered the Chishti affiliation through this rising Sufi pop culture within India.

January 10, 2020

Kite Flying

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 1:35 pm

Kankave Baazi

That is exactly what ‘kite’ means in Lucknow. A wondrous pastime and at times, full-time too. Not only kids, but also Bade Miyan (as an elderly person is respectfully referred in Lucknow) take to their rooftops, on the banks of river Gomti, on the embankment, on the pavement and at times in the middle of the roads, where traffic has to wait till the flyers finish with their, oh! so important task of flying kites, cutting another kite or grabbing the falling ones. All this and more is a usual scene in the old city area of Lucknow.

We take you on this exploration visit to a rooftop, where you learn the art of flying kites and winning the match. You learn the vernacular dictum of this game and indulge in a real match. Kite flying enthusiasts of the city gather at one place and mesmerize you, with old anecdotes connected to kite-flying and that of the Nawabs. We also treat you to traditional soft beverages (hot/cold) and your rendezvous with kites may leave you praying to God, that sun may never set and you be flying kites all day and all night.

Cost :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Starting Time : 

Winters / Summers – Anytime by appointment from 11 am to 3 pm

Expected Duration : 

2 hours (minimum)

Remarks : 

Kite flying depends largely on weather conditions. In case of rains it may have to be called off randomly. At times slow or very harsh winds too are not conducive fir this activity and in such conditions, flying kites may not be enjoyable, but there can be no refunds in that case as most of the programmes are pre-arranged on exclusive basis. 

A special kite making workshop can also be arranged for special interest FITs/Groups. This workshop will explain each aspect of kite making inside an actual workshop where kites are made. Check with us the cost of this programme separately.

Village Cuisine Experience

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 1:21 pm

unlearn urban, learn rural

India has primarily been a rural country. Though it has lately transformed into an urban base, yet the majority still lives in rural areas and leads a rural lifestyle. As they say, ‘old habits die hard’, an average urban Indian still at times vouches for the village cuisine of his region and loves to indulge in it at times, though now giving it a name of a ‘luxurious experience’ that is rare in daily life today.

As Indian villages today have the so called ‘luxury’ of eating the freshest of the fresh vegetables and meat, using the freshly ground spices, following the traditional cooking patterns et al, it sure contributes immensely to the dramatic change in cooking style and the taste of food. Some of it is due to the loyalty of villagers to the age-old cooking systems and patterns that are followed in Indian Village cooking, while other reason is the limited availability of resources and modern cooking techniques in the villages, such as a simple gas stove, which is still rare in villages and our villagers still stick to the traditional wood or cow-dung cake fire for cooking, unavailability of power to run refrigerators for storage, forces them (or gives them the luxury) to buy fresh, cook fresh and eat fresh at all times.

We take you to a countryside (45 min drive from Lucknow) into a traditional village, where you unlearn all that is urban and learn all that is rural – we learn this ethnic cuisine and enjoy a limited but a very unique cuisine that urban population today calls, ‘luxury’.

Cost :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Starting Time :

Winters / Summers – 11 am (lunch) – time flexible 

Expected Duration :

4 hours

Remarks :

This is an experience with an exclusive arrangements in the countryside village near the city. 

Quite an unpretentious cooking experience with minimum hygiene related interventions

Expect this to be a half day programme, returning to the city in the afternoon.

Kotwara Insight

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 1:05 pm

Visit Muzaffar & Meera Ali’s Lucknow Home

A visit to Kotwara House (by Appointment) is in itself a revealing experience of sorts. Kotwara House is Lucknow abode of the legendary film maker, fashion designer, painter, poet, architect or rather call them ‘A couple with many feathers in their cap of creativity’, Raja Muzaffar & Meera Ali. Belonging to the erstwhile royal family of Kotwara, he inherited the title of ‘Raja’ (title of King) from his father and today he lives to prove that ‘Royalty is not about thrones, but service to mankind’. He is decorated with ‘Padam Shri’, a high civilian honour by Government of India for his contributions in the field of culture, heritage conservation, art and society. When you think of Lucknow, you think of Umrao Jaan and more recently Jaanisar – high note films by Muzaffar Ali, about Lucknow’s enviable culture, innate mannerism, couture fashion (often recessionista), soothing music and vogue style, bundled together in great period films with an awesome story. Muzaffar & Meera’s ancestral Lucknow house, known as The Kotwara House is a part of the erstwhile palace complex of Kaiserbagh, built by the last king of Awadh, Wajid Ali Shah. The very aura of the place, interiors and artifacts that adorn it, makes it no less than a living museum of sorts. Each corner is thoughtfully decorated and curated by Meera and Muzaffar themselves. This house was actually restored to its present glory by Meera Ali herself, who happens to be an architect by education – she brought back its glory and all the attention that it used to enjoy during the British Raj. We will be privileged to have access to the living spaces of the house to understand how this creative couple lives, works and eats.

Kotwara house is now a living centre for craft with design and restoration inputs from Muzaffar Ali’s architect wife, Meera Ali. Meera & Muzaffar have revived the traditional craftsmanship of Lucknow, and have evolved a high-end couture brand, ‘KOTWARA’, with its flagship store at DLF Emporio, in New Delhi. They so very often hold exhibitions and shows world over to showcase their products. The authenticity of the palette and design is evident from the two films by Muzaffar Ali, ‘Umrao Jaan’ and ‘Jaanisaar’, that have become benchmarks of showcasing the period culture of Awadh.

We have an opportunity to enjoy a great afternoon, seeing their workshop of Chikan, Zari and Mukaesh for their label, ‘Kotwara’. Admire each piece being readied, with an opportunity to interact with highly skilled artisans at work. We also get to see the collected artifacts, some great works of calligraphy and paintings. Also enjoy short dance clips from Muzaffar’s landmark films including Umrao Jaan over a cup of hot tea/coffee served here. If we are lucky we get to meet Muzaffar and Meera Ali at their home, else sit on the couch, where he sits and his creative juices flow.

Cost :

On request

Starting Time : 

Winters / Summers – Anytime by appointment from 11 am to 5 pm

Expected Duration : 

1.5 hours

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive and privileged access a private home by appointment.

Curated Dining at Sheesh Mahal

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 12:49 pm

Tornos’ Home dining experience – by appointment

Sheesh Mahal is the first Palace Complex of Nawab Asif-Ud-Daula, now hard to believe due to mindless demolition and construction. Yet it is home to the decedents of the erstwhile royal family that has lived here in difficult contrasting conditions, after the failed Indian Mutiny in 1858.

It is said that the royalty and the royal lifestyle never fades, no matter what the financial condition of a royal be. The generations old recipes are still a part of the daily meal at the Sheesh Mahal and the family takes utmost pride in following the same un-distorted recipes for their daily meals. The only impact of modern times is on service style that is not so grand now and the number of dishes served being fewer they were when Asif-Ud-Daula dined here.

The family’s connection due to inter-royalty weddings with the royal families of Nizam of Hyderabad and Nawab of Rampur, have immensely impacted the recipes of the family, bringing in a lot many dishes to their cuisine, yet maintaining the authenticity and purity of their very own Awadhi cuisine. A typical fare at Sheeh Mahal includes Kebab, Korma, Pulao, Rumali and Phirni. Food at Sheesh Mahal is prepared by their ancestral family cooks and the ladies of the house and each meal here is a celebration of household family recipes that have been passed on from mother-in-laws and mothers of the present generation that resides here.

Cost :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Starting Time : 

Winters / Summers – 7 pm

Expected Duration : 

2 hours

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive and privileged home dining product that operates every day by appointment and pre-booking.

Under this product the main focus is on food and not on any kind of family interaction or entertainment. The menu is curated by the family itself for the day and the meal is based on fixed menu or could be pre-plated.

This royal family has a long and illustrious culinary tradition and is known to be loyal to it even today. It is just this passion for authentic family recipes and undiluted tradition of culinary expertise that is the highlight of the meals served here.

Lecture Insight

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 12:40 pm

A lecture is an oral presentation, intended to present information or teach people about a particular subject. Lectures are used to convey critical information, history, background and theories. Lectures delivered by talented speakers can be highly stimulating for special interest tourist groups.

Lucknow by and large as a destination has never been on a constant or a singular historical analysis platform. It has a history written with a single perspective to suit a particular class. But to reach a logical conclusion or to understand history or for that matter any topic of interest, be it the Awadhi Cuisine, Architecture, Uprising of 1857, Life during the Nawabi Period et al, we have to understand it in the light of facts and circumstances and not just read and learn. History is often written by the winners, never by the losers, thus history tends to be twisted, to suit the whims and fancies of the writer, who has been the winner of the battle, so why not listen to the looser as well and understand all point of views, before forming an opinion.

At Tornos we have a panel of experts drawn from different quarters, who are specialists in their own fields by virtue of their interest, reading, profession or experience. These lecturers come in as a Guest Speakers for special interest tourists, to talk to tourist groups or FITs on the subject for about two hours. This interactive lecture can be arranged over a casual afternoon tea or an evening cocktail, to enhance the academic value of the tour.

Cost :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Starting Time :

At any time. Preferably as a pre-dinner activity or over tea/drinks.

Also may be taken independently at any location (preferably a city hotel – banquet)

Expected Duration :

30 min (may be a part of larger programme)

Remarks :

This is an intellectually enriching session and often helps special interest groups understand and relate better with the subject/theme.

Kathak Interpretation

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 12:21 pm

Kathak is one of the eight forms of Indian classical dances. This dance traces its origins to the nomadic bards of ancient north India, known as ‘Kathakars’ or the storytellers. Its form today contains traces of temple and ritual dances. From 16th century onward, it also absorbed certain features of Persian dance while in the courts of Nawabs of Awadh. Today, Kathak has emerged as a distinct dance form. Being the only classical dance of India having links with Muslim culture, it represents a unique synthesis of Hindu and Muslim genius in art. Further, Kathak is the only form of classical dance wedded to Hindustani or the North Indian music, both of them have had a parallel growth, each feeding and sustaining the other.

Classical dance forms in India have to be backed by a fair understanding of the many nuances, and more so when a dance form is based on a story, that is narrated visually by the dancer through the dance. This Kathak Interpretation session allows you, to admire this complex classical dance form, appreciate the steps of dance, hand movements, facial expressions, the story-line and the music. The forms include, temple dances, court dances and Sufi interventions that complete the understanding of this dance form.

Cost :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Starting Time :

Pre-dinner activity – This may be combined with Dine with the Maharaja

Also may be taken independently at any location (city hotel – banquets)

Expected Duration :

1 hour (as a part of larger programme)

Remarks :

This is a live dance / music performance but may not be just seen as an entertainment. It is backed by researched knowledge that is shared with guests.

Guests need to be maintaining decorum and basic etiquette during the performance as it is not only entertainment but the product is based on knowledge and art-appreciation.  

Vive La Martiniere !

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 10:37 am

– by permission

La Martiniere is one of those few educational institutions in India, that still is wrapped in traditions of the British-Indian Educational Institutions. Of course most of it has changed to respect and acknowledge free India, but there still are many traditions, that are a part of the old customs kept alive, to inculcate discipline among children, make them feel proud of their alma mater and try not to erase history all together. How else would one explain that the school has its own pipe band, has military training as a part of its curriculum, stables to train students in horse-riding, school hoists its own flag atop its building, has its own buglers et al. Morning chapel service, choirs singing the hymens and the morning assembly are traditions that are sights to behold. Then some special occasions such as the Constantia Day (1st October), Republic Day (26th January), Independence Day (15th August), Teachers’ Day (5th September), Founder’s Day (13th September), Hodson’s Run (Nov), Hashman’s Inter-Platoon and Inter-Wing Drill (Dec) and many more are treat to ones eyes (indicative 6 months calendar schedule posted on below on this webpage, though subject to change without notice).

We at Tornos have exclusive access to all these and more. Guests watch the proceedings, meet the students and the masters and of course have an opportunity to understand the traditions with closest proximity. It definitely is an absolute privilege for guests to be able to enter some of those areas, that otherwise are restricted for general tourists, to attend these events that are strictly by invitation and to experience the joys of being in La Martiniere. Why not club these with the visit to the college and make this visit even more meaningful and awesome.

Cost :

On request

Starting Time : 

Winters / Summers – *As per college

Expected Duration : 

2 – 3 hours

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive and privileged visits and operates as per school calendar with prior appointment and pre-booking.

*Attending the morning Chapel Service and Assembly will require guests to reach the school at about 0730 hrs (summers) and 0830 hrs (winters).

*Certain special days would have other timings to start, while these would be announced a few days in advance, usually all of them would be in the morning. The duration of this experience is about 2 hrs including a guided tour of the estate and the school.

Tea with Nawab

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 10:04 am

– by appointment

After seeing the fabulous monuments of the city, built by the Nawabs of Awadh in Lucknow, how awesome it would be, to meet a descendant of the Nawab over an afternoon tea. Talk to him about all that he has seen changing over the years in Lucknow, know a bit about his family and experience the innate etiquettes, the mannerism and the art of speech that is mastered by him. There is more to the city of Lucknow than just its fabulous and grand monuments, there is culture and host of cultured people and their lifestyle, which is not bound by the financial well being, rather is a treasured inheritance of a few families, Nawab’s being one of those.

We take you for this one to one session, after the city tour of Lucknow, where you interact with Nawab Sahib on diverse topics of history, craft and cuisine over a cup of tea that he is always delighted to serve you when at his home in his decked up small family museum that houses inherited antiques.

Cost :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Starting Time : 

Winters / Summers – Anytime by appointment from 11 am to 5 pm

Expected Duration : 

1 hours

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive and privileged meeting over tea that operates every day by appointment and pre-booking.

Curated Dining at Kotwara House

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 9:35 am

Tornos’ Home dining experience – by appointment

Kotwara is not just another estate of an erstwhile royal family, but a fine example of how there are still some royalties that are tied deeply to their roots. Raja Muzaffar Ali and his wife Rani Meera Ali do not need any introduction due to their intense involvement in preservation of art and craft of Awadh.  History of Kotwara dates back to year 1009, thus making it one of the oldest estates in Awadh. While the estate is located in the region of Terai – the forest range of Dudhwa, the city home of the royal family in Lucknow exists since the days of Raj and is located within the palace complex of Kaiserbagh.

Be it the period film of Muzaffar Ali, ‘Umrao Jaan’, where Muzaffar as a film maker portrays a culture that disappeared quietly without leaving any strand behind or his wife Meera’s work of art through traditional embroidery and her efforts to unearth some very unique, almost extinct recipes, not only from Kotwara but also from numerous other royalties of India.

Meera’s efforts and remarkable research on food and tastes is evident from her recent book, ‘Dining with the Nawabs’ and it is indeed so exciting to dine at Kotwara House in Lucknow on an exclusive pre-set menu. The menu for our guests is specially curated by Muzaffar & Meera Ali, while the food is cooked by their family cooks in small quantity, just for the diners of the day. If Muzaffar & Meera are in residence, they are happy to dine with our guests, else they remotely supervise this dining experience, opening their family home to us and their personal family cooks, whose ancestors have served the royal family of Kotwara, prepare a great meal based on the exclusive menu of the day.

Cost :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Starting Time : 

Winters / Summers – 7 pm

Expected Duration : 

2.5 hours

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive and privileged home dining product that operates every day by appointment and pre-booking.

Under this product the main focus is on food and not on any kind of family interaction or entertainment. The menu is curated by the family itself for the day and the meal is based on fixed menu or could be pre-plated.

This royal family has a long and illustrious culinary tradition and is known to be loyal to it even today. It is just this passion for authentic family recipes and undiluted tradition of culinary expertise that is the highlight of the meals served here.

Tea At Tornos Studio

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 8:47 am

(by appointment)

Check Upcoming Events at The Tornos Studio

At the Tornos Studio we have the largest collection of books and literature based on Lucknow, specially on the uprising of 1857-58. Guests are welcome to read these books here or to watch a film/documentary from our vast collection, over their afternoon tea.

Tea at The Tornos Studio is a replicated British custom, quite popular in Lucknow with a huge Ango-India community that still lives here. At The Tornos Studio we bring out our most elegant collection of china and silver and engage in a friendly conversation with the guests. A typical tea menu at The Tornos Studio includes some home baked essentials, such as scones, fairy-cakes, assorted pastries, cookies and of course the traditional cucumber sandwiches. We often include some Indian tea-time snacks as well at this afternoon tea. All this served on some very elegant cake-stands and serving bowls bought from The House of Fraser and Harrods in London. We also use some great China and silver from The Buckingham Palace’s souvenir shop in London. A lot of serving essentials are acquired from some royal house-holds or at auctions in India and abroad too. All this and more, makes the afternoon tea at The Tornos Studio an elegant way to spend a relaxed afternoon.

Check Upcoming Events at The Tornos Studio

Cost :

Free – No obligation

Starting Time :

Winters / Summers – 11 am – 6 pm (Any time by appointment only. No walk-ins)

Expected Duration :

As long as you wish to read (flexible duration)

Remarks :

Min 2 hour tours spent here is good unless you are researching some subject and wish to be here longer consulting books.

Closed on Sunday and the festival of Holi.


What is an Afternoon Tea ?

Afternoon Tea were a social must among the British in India and more so in Lucknow, which was the seat of the British Resident, had a fairly large British & Anglo-Indian population and was quite influenced by the custom of meeting at Afternoon Tea parties

Afternoon Tea is quite an open concept with no fixed rules or dishes to be served. The menu changes with place and has native shades with many local dishes being a part of this. Although we tend to associate a few things as a must to be served, such as the dainty cucumber sandwiches, fairy cakes, pastries and scones, there is no set menu and it really depends on the time of year, the setting, and above all personal tastes. Taking center stage, of course, is the tea, served from a silver or a china teapot and the utmost importance is given to the quality and brewing of tea. We at The Tornos Studio serve all the essentials with great emphasis on tea, crockery and the cutlery, that in itself is an attraction.

More about it…

‘Afternoon Tea’ did not exist before the 19th century. At that time lunch was eaten quite early in the day and dinner wasn’t served until 8 or 9 o’clock at night. But it wasn’t until Anna, the seventh Duchess of Bedford, asked for tea and light refreshments in her room one afternoon, around 1830, that the ritual began. The Duchess enjoyed her ‘taking of tea’ so much that she started inviting her friends to join her. Before long having elegant tea parties was very fashionable. Demand for tea wares grew and soon there were tea services in silver and fine bone china, trays, cake stands, servers, tea caddies, tea strainers, teapots, and tea tables.

As times and lifestyles changed the popularity of the formal afternoon tea waned, but has seen a revival in recent years as people once again enjoy its elegance. A “Devon Cream Tea” or simply “Cream Tea” has recently been adopted where scones, with clotted cream and jam, are made the main attraction served alongside a steaming pot of tea.

Although we tend to associate dainty cucumber sandwiches and scones with afternoon tea, there is no set menu and it really depends on the time of year, the setting, and personal tastes. Sandwiches and scones are standard fare but other choices can include muffins, crumpets, bread and butter, cakes, cookies (biscuits), gingerbread, pastries, fruit, and a selection of jam and jellies, preserves, lemon curd, and clotted cream.

Taking center stage, of course, is the tea. Served from a teapot, the brewing of the tea is very important. First, rinse your teapot with warm water. Next, bring a kettle of water to boil and pour it over the tea leaves, letting it steep for three to five minutes. If using loose tea the rule is one heaping teaspoon of tea for each cup of water, plus one teaspoon “for the pot”.

At one time it was customary to first pour a little milk into the teacup. It was thought that the fine porcelain cup may crack if the hot tea was poured directly into the empty cup. Sugar was then offered in cube form, with tongs, or else granulated.

Normally the host or hostess pours the tea and serves the food. Guests can either be seated around a table or else in armchairs with an end table nearby for them to place their cup and saucer, teaspoon, plate, napkin, knife and fork.

A Bit of History…

According to a legend, tea was first discovered by Chinese Emperor Shen Nong in 2737 BC when some tea leaves floated into a pot of boiling water. It wasn’t until the mid-1600s, however, that tea finally reached England. Due to its sale being controlled by trade monopolies, and that it had to be imported from China via boat traveling around the Cape of Africa and then north to England, it was a rather costly commodity.

The first known record of tea being imported into England was the charter granted by Elizabeth I to The East India Company. This document recorded ships reaching England in 1637, but dealings with Chinese merchants did not appear until 1644.

The first merchant to sell tea was Thomas Garway who offered it in both a dry and liquid form at his coffeehouse in Exchange Alley in London. The popularity of the coffee house grew quickly and there were more than 500 in London by 1700. By the middle of the 18th century, tea replaced ale and gin as the nation’s drink. As with most customs in England, when having tea became an accepted practice of the Royals, it then spread down to the working classes.

Types of Tea Parties…

As supper normally was served at 8:00 or 9:00 p.m., having tea that was served along with light sandwiches and broths in late afternoon, helped ward off hunger until then. Two types of teas developed, one called a High Tea and the other called a Low Tea. The one most commonly served by the wealthy was called a Low Tea and revolved more on its presentation and conversation. The working classes would celebrate a High Tea, which was more of a meal including meats and vegetables as well as tea, cookies and fruits.

Is that so…

By the middle of the 18th century, the tax on tea had risen so high that tea smuggling began. This also lead to the product’s adulteration as it was a most profitable commodity. It wasn’t until Prime Minister William Pitt had the Commutation Act passed which cut the tax on tea from 119% to 12.5% that tea smuggling ended. Adulteration of tea continued however, until the English Food and Drug Act of 1875 that imposed heavy fines or imprisonment.

January 11, 2019

Meal Planning (We Curate Your Menu)

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 1:14 pm

– by Prateek Hira

In this product we plan what you eat and where you eat. A course meal is served to you on a pre-set menu under an expert guidance of Prateek Hira (Avadhi Cuisine Expert, by virtue of his education, knowledge and experience).

Meal planning is an art, specially when you are planning a meal from the a-la-carte menu of a specialty cuisine, which may not contain your native food. Though a lot of description goes in about the preparation and a sort of showcased recipe too is a part of the menu book of all good restaurants, but seldom do they rate their own stuff, putting you always at a risk of ordering some lunatic stuff and ending your meal with a negative impression.

Restaurants, world over are business houses that often tend to sell over-priced or over-stocked stuff from their selection list and at times we feel that it is improper to talk about the prices, when a captain or steward is suggesting us a dish, thereby risking our pockets unknowingly or just draining our credit cards. Often the restaurant staff shows that it has all the knowledge of a Specialty Chef, though they might be just the most uninformed and the most ignorant pack in the restaurant. They are great people, when it comes to sales, sweet talking and of course have great serving skills, but seldom do they have knowledge about the specialty cuisine that we are searching for our exclusive meal.

When one speaks of Awadhi Cuisine, it is so very complicated and the appreciation is in the preparation and its combination. There are dishes that are cooked overnight or marinated for hours together or for that matter cooked in sealed pots to retain its juices and aroma. To appreciate such a cuisine you ought to have an expert plan your meal and servings. This is the only way to get the utmost satisfaction and appreciate such a complex cuisine.

Prateek Hira is known for his researches in Awadhi Cuisine and has studied and experienced this subject well. He regularly visits eateries and homes to compare the real cuisine with the one that is served at fine dine restaurants. His interest makes him a master of this subject, backed by his specialized education and extensive travels. ‘A foodie by interest and a chef by education’, would be just the right phrase for him. Prateek will be more than happy and willing to personally plan your Awadhi Meal in course servings within your assigned budgets and he will organise to donate the left-over to the poor and needy immediately after this meal (Lunch / Dinner).

Participating Restaurants :

  • Oudhyana (Hotel Taj Mahal)
  • Falaknuma (Hotel Clarks Awadh)
  • Sepia (Hotel Renaissance)
  • Dastarkhwan (Standalone)
  • Royal Café (Standalone)

More details on request : info@tornosindia.com

Cost :

No cost / No Obligation for guests traveling with Tornos.

Starting Time : 

Lunch / Dinner (Subject to availability) 

Expected Duration : 

1 hour (minimum)

Remarks : 

This is a non-obligatory service by Tornos to popularise Awadhi Cuisine among the visiting guests.

Prateek (subject to his availability) will be happy to curate the meal for the diners.

An exclusive lecture may be arranged by Prateek Hira on the subject of cuisine at any location or participating restaurants where meal is served.

Chhat (छत) – The Terrace (Culinary Workshop)

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 12:55 pm

An open air popup private kitchen on the terrace – by appointment

‘Chhat’ is a vernacular for an open terrace or a roof top. The name ‘Chhat’ became popular among all of us at Tornos as a hang-out area, when we often assembled here for a casual chat or organised some small internal get-together to cut the venue cost.

This place is a popup kitchen (on a home rooftop) that comes alive to hold private cooking sessions in an unpretentious casual home-like setting or to enjoy home-cooked potluck dinner (non-commercial. It is not a restaurant or a paid eatery).  It can accommodate a maximum of 25 guests at a time for live-cooking interactive sessions, based a bit on the concept of, ‘Guestaurant’ (A guestaurant is a unique concept also at times referred to as, ‘Anti-Restaurant’ or a ‘Supper Club’ that is more personal in nature and not a a commercial restaurant and revolves around the main theme of exclusive cooking aimed at not making commercial profits, but to share the passion of food and knowledge of cuisine with like-minded patrons). 

The Chhat as we refer to it (or a home terrace) could be an ideal place to enjoy an interactive cooking session in a home setting.

Cost :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Starting Time : 

7 pm (operational from October-March only) 

Expected Duration : 

2.5 hours

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive programme offered to groups of more than 7 guests by appointment and pre-booking. For lesser numbers check with us for other options on info@tornosindia.com

The menu is curated by the food curator for the day and based on the menu a culinary session takes place at the terrace. 

January 19, 2018

Vintage Drive

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 9:48 am

What better way to reach Lucknow’s very own Oxford Street in a vintage car that will transport you to the year of its existence. On this tour we pick you up in one of the mid-1900s car and an expert drives you through the city to reach you for the Victorian Walk, where your Walk Leader takes over to conduct this walk and bring you back to the car park to be driven back to your hotel.

Enjoy this vintage drive, clubbed with the Victorian Walk or just as a stand-alone short drive through the city to experience the feeling of the bygone era in all its splendour and full of romanticism.

Cost & Details :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Eid Tour

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 9:33 am

(Festive Tour Series by Tornos)

About the festival 

Eid-ul-Fitr is an Islamic festival that celebrates the first day of the month of Shawwal (Islamic Calendar) marking the end of month long fasting of Ramzan (Ramadan) and feasting from the break of fast. 

Ramzam is the holiest month in the Islamic calendar  which is a lunar calendar and the month begins with the sighting of the new moon. The holy book of Islam, Quran was introduced by Prophet Mohammad in this month thus its importance is manifold for followers of Islam.Muslims during this month fast during the day without consuming food and water and break the fast at sunset each day. 

Tour Calendar (As these tours are based on moon-sighting, the dates may differ by a one day, plus-minus

  • Sunday, May 24, 2020
  • Thursday, May 13, 2021
  • Tuesday, May 03, 2022
  • Saturday, April 22, 2023
  • Wednesday, April 10, 2024

More details on request : info@tornosindia.com

Cost :

No cost / No Obligation for guests traveling with Tornos.

Starting Time : 

Refreshments / Tea / Lunch / Dinner (Subject to schedule & availability announced a few days in advance) 

Expected Duration : 

3 – 4 hour (minimum)

Remarks : 

This is a non-obligatory service by Tornos for its guests and to connect with local families and communities during festive occasions.

An exclusive lecture may be arranged by an expert on the subject of festivals at any location. 

January 14, 2018

Flea Market Walk

Filed under: Home Product Box,Walks — Tornos @ 5:17 am

The term, flea market, might have originated from a theory, where people sold old stuff, often infested with blood sucking pesky little parasites or may be the markets that fly off after a day of sale at one location to another, but what ever the theory of origin be, these markets often are very exciting to be in and at times to close a great deal too. A test ground for your bargaining skills, a great place to buy some stuff and then be told, you struck a great deal or at times be told, that you have been cheated to buy it quite expensive, and of course to find some great fake brands too. Imagine a pair of Nike at rupees 200 or a Gucci bag for 100 and did we tell you about a Ray Ban for 25?

Lucknow too has its own set of flea markets (respectably referred as weekly markets) that operate on the footpaths and half streets as well, in the open, when the main marketplaces have their weekly off.

We at Tornos have very carefully identified a few great local flea markets in Lucknow, that are a real fun to be in and spend a few hours discovering or shopping for some great bargains. Tornos operates four such walks, where we take you to these markets, brush-up your bargaining skills and an avid bargainer accompanies you during this tour to get you the best deal, if you stick your eyes upon something in the market.

Flea Markets (weekly market) Time & Day of Operation
Nakhas 1530 – 1630 hrs Sunday
Mahanagar 1530 – 1630 hrs Wednesday
Aminabad 1530 – 1630 hrs Thursday
Havelock Road 1530 – 1630 hrs Saturday
   

 

Cost :

INR 4000 per person (min 2 guests)

Starting Time : 

3 pm (as on schedule/in mentioned markets)

Expected Duration : 

1.5 hours

Remarks : 

This walking tour is available only on the days as mentioned in the schedule and in that particular area where the weekly markets pop-up.

Does not operate on any other day than the ones mentioned in the schedule. Also remains suspended during a few festivals such as Holi, Eid & Diwali.

Sunday Junk Market Walk

Filed under: Home Product Box,Walks — Tornos @ 5:10 am

(Sunday Only)

It is 7 am on Sunday, when most of Lucknow is sleeping and has planned to get up late and lazily in a true Lakhnawi style, but there are a few who are walking on this unique stretch of the road that is now beginning to crowd with antique and scrap dealers, coming in with their collection, some real, some fake, some old, some broken and yet at times worth millions of pounds, but surely unknown to the scrap dealer himself – all this has to sell today. The collectors or the big dealers throng this weekly market, as early as possible, to get the best pieces before any one else could lay his hands on them.

We take you through this market and if luck favours you, you might find your much desired piece that might cost you a 1000 Pounds elsewhere. You walk down the road to explore each shop, just in case something catches your eyes. We help you to bargain and at times close a deal for you.

Cost :

INR 3000 per person (min 2 guests)

Starting Time : 

6:30 am (Sunday Only)

Expected Duration : 

1.5-2 hours

Remarks : 

This walking tour is available only on Sunday early morning as a pre-breakfast option.

This tour covers an old city junk market famous for antiques and junk. It is important to reach early as most of antiques later in the day are sold off to visiting collectors.

Does not operate on any other day but Sunday. Also remains suspended during a few festivals such as Holi, Eid & Mohorram.

January 11, 2018

Learn Calligraphy

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 9:58 am

Calligraphy is a visual art related to writing. It is the design and execution of lettering, with a broad tip instrument, brush, or any other writing instrument. Contemporary calligraphic practice can be defined as, “the art of giving form to signs in an expressive, harmonious, and skillful manner”. Modern calligraphy ranges from functional inscriptions and designs to fine-art pieces where the letters may or may not be readable. During the Mughals in India, calligraphy got prominence and one can see on almost all the Mughal era monuments, calligraphic inscriptions in some form or another.

On this experience, in association with ‘Ilm-o-Hunar’, an organisation that promotes calligraphy in modern times and is intensely involved in spreading this dying art among the masses, we take you through a five hours step-by-step session in Urdu or Arabic, using modern day instruments such as sketch pens, fountain pens, pencils etc. These can be done on paper, ceramic plates, on walls, metals, stones et al. A session typically will not only provide a hands-on experience to participating guests, but might also encourage guests to take up this art on a thorough 15 days detailed course (this course is not a part of our day experience).

Cost :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Starting Time :

11 am (Flexible)

Expected Duration :

6 hours (split in two halves, pre-lunch & post lunch)

Remarks :

This is a learning experience (hands-on) of calligraphy for special interest guests.

The workshop is held at a traditional calligraphers home in an unpretentious setting.

Does not operate on Friday and a few festivals such as Holi, Eid & Mohorram.

January 19, 2017

Casserole Evening – Potluck

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 12:40 pm

Broadly, there are three categories of cooks in Lucknow. The bawarchis cook food in large quantities. The rakabdars cook in small gourmet quantities. The nanfus make a variety of rotis, chapatis, naans, sheermals, kulchas and taftans (breads). Normally, one cook does not prepare the entire meal. There are specialists for different dishes and also a variety of helpers, degshos wash the utensils, the masalchis grind the masala and the mehris carry the khwan (tray) to be spread on the dastarkhwan. The wealthy always had their kitchens supervised by an officer called, ‘daroga-e-bawarchi khana’ or mohtamim. It was this officer’s seal on the khwan that guaranteed quality.

Cuisine is indeed a vast subject and it is absolutely a wrong notion that the cook who is a good cook can do all the dishes well. He could cook well, but then surely not all of them from him would be the best. One who makes the best Shaami Kabab may not make the best Murg Musallam. Specially in Awadh, where perfection in cooking is a serious business and where cooks too have been classified according to their expertise, it is all the more difficult to say that a meal any where was the best, a dish or two could be, but surely other dishes could be better elsewhere. Casserole Evening is just that, we get the best by the best, so what you get is just the best. Casserole Evening is a concept that revolves around the best dish from a home, in a casserole that is brought to the venue, usually a local home, to be shared with the guests over dinner. A casserole of Shaami Kebabs comes in from Rashida aapa, Lucknowi Keema-Matar from Begum Parveen Sahiba, Gosht Daalcha is cooked by Begum Almas Abdullaha, Raan Mussalam is done by Saleeman Bi, Phirni by Nooreen, Bun-Kababs by Nadeem Bhai and so on.

On a pre-announced date (please check below upcoming event dates), the venue pops up as a large dining space, casseroles arrive, diners reach too and the dinner is served. Guests enjoy a full course meal, interact with the people who prepared it, understand the recipes and of course enjoy one of the best home-cooked dinner in Lucknow at our Casserole Evening.

Cost & Details :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Be the guest with the best

As a visitor to the city, we do not expect you to be able to contribute a dish. We absolutely understand that you are a guest in our city and it is possible that you can’t come prepared with a casserole of your own. We can give you a kitchen to do just that, let us know what ingredients (of course there is a natural limitation of ingredients here, so you may have to innovate and make use of the ones available) you would like to have, so that we can arrange these and offer our kitchen to you earlier that day. Even if you’re not comfortable in the kitchen and you still want to be invited to the potluck festivities at the Casserole Evening, do get in touch with us we might just ask you to bring in some ready to eat accompanying food, such as some pickle or chutney.

General Rules for Guests

  • Try and bring everything you need to serve your dish. We have already given you our kitchen and the dining space. While after our guests have left we toil to clean when all the guests have departed, so help out by bringing some things from home. And people don’t have 20 trivets—bring your own, or bring dish towels to place under your hot dish.
  • Try and get some rare and innovative dish, rather than just bringing in a boring stuff that all the guests have eaten before and might tend to compare with the earlier ones. Talk to us before you have decided on what you can bring, so as to avoid a repetition. You need to understand that it is not a cooking competition, so let your dish be unique and stand out from the rest on the table.
  • Avoid the triple-S: stinky, spicy, and strange. Things that are super garlicky, overly spicy, or have “weird” ingredients make people hesitant to go for your dish.
  • Casserole Evening is not always a cooking session, unless announced in advance. Please bring in prepared dishes, so that you just need to warm them up or garnish them here or may be just serve as they are. If you intend to bring your dish in a container other than the casserole or a serving plate, ensure that you have that too with you. This is important to reduce the burden on the host of providing multiple dishes to our guests. If you absolutely have to make a dish live please let us know that in advance, so that special provisions are made for this at the designated venue.

This experience is based on pre-announced schedules, updated on this page of our website from time to time. Or this may be exclusively arranged for visiting groups (min 6 guests).

Mango Sojourn

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 12:30 pm

Just 40 km from Lucknow is Malihabad – the mango belt of Lucknow. Unique variety of mangoes are produced here called ‘Dushehri’. These mangoes are exported all over the world and are famous for their sweet taste, that can never be found in any other climatic conditions other than Lucknow’s bordering countryside, Malihabad.

We take you to experience this unique mango lifestyle of countryside, where mangoes are a way of life, the belt smells of mangoes and we sit down under the trees on a jute cot to savour the fresh fruits from the tree, cooled in a water bucket.

Cost & Details :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

 

January 11, 2017

Luckluscious – Learn a dish

Filed under: Home Product Box,Wow — Tornos @ 8:58 am

At times we shy away from cooking straight out of the recipe books and more so when the cuisine is as complex as Awadh’s. At times this is because of not having a proper hands-on experience, that goes a long way to create confidence, or not being comfortable with interpreting complex recipes, or for that matter not being sure while playing with unknown or unheard spices. We surely want to come up with an awesome dish when entertaining family and friends at home or when throwing a party, but then, we also want to be sure of what we churn out, should be liked and appreciated.

How about learning a dish from Lucknow, in Lucknow by a Lucknowite ? be it making a kabab or korma. Just one dish mastered to perfection. We give you a chance to do this at any local kitchen. You get to know the cooking process from the scratch, cook with your host and experience the joy of cooking.

The idea centers around cooking and understanding the nuances of a dish in Awadhi cooking (the concentration is not on the meal, as the session limits to a single dish, of course guests get to taste what they make, but surely that is not a complete meal).

An individual or a family takes care of the guest, on this two to three hours session, in a private kitchen and concentrates on a single dish cooking rather than teaching a full meal. Dishes cooked are quite simple with an intention to help guests replicate these back home.

Cost :

On request – info@tornosindia.com

Starting Time : 

Flexible (Ideally an early evening experience)

Expected Duration : 

2 – 3 hours

Remarks : 

This is an exclusive and a privileged home/studio cooking experience that focuses on mastering one dish (single dish).

Meal is not a part of this. The idea is only to master a dish that will be taught under this experience.  Though tasting is possible only in small quantities as cooked and as a part of cooking process – this may not qualify as eating a meal. 

Experiences

error: Content is protected !!